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Thread: Except for NBA, not much diversity in Sports TV audience

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    Administrator Unclebuck's Avatar
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    Default Except for NBA, not much diversity in Sports TV audience

    Sports Media Watch has been running a 4 part series on just who watches what sport. There was a thread about age, income level ane gender. Here is an article about diversity. The headline is NBA viewing audience is the youngest and most diverse. (to see some of the graphs and such, click on the link.

    58% of NBA viewers are minority viewers.

    I find this interesting and without getting into it in a sports forum, I think this helps explain why for some segments of society the NBA just isn't on their radar. By that I mean it is not that they watched and didn't like, but that it is not on their possible menu of things to watch - especially on a national level. (I wonder how much of the audience compared to other sports comes from urban areas - NBA has to lead in that category also)

    http://www.sportsmediawatch.com/2014...s-tv-audience/

    The NBA is a veritable melting pot compared to the other leagues when it comes to minority viewership. Of the events analyzed in the ‘demo reel’ series, the NBA Finals easily had the highest percentage of African American, Hispanic and Asian viewers.

    African Americans made up between 32% and 38% of the audience for the NBA Finals, with viewership ranging from 5.1 to 8.4 million. Only the WNBA Finals had a higher percentage of African American viewership, ranging from 34% to 42% of the audience, and no other event attracted more than 3.5 million (NCAA Tournament title game).


    Between 15% and 17% of the NBA Finals audience came from the Hispanic demographic, easily outpacing the World Series (8-10%). Hispanic viewership ranged from 2.1 million to 4.1 million; no other event examined earned more than 1.8 million (World Series Game 6).
    Finally, Asian viewers made up a more modest 7-8% of the NBA Finals audience, but that was still ahead the other events analyzed. Only the U.S. Open singles finals had a comparable percentage of Asian viewers (6-7%). Between 1.0 and 1.9 million Asian viewers watched each game of the NBA Finals; the only other event to top one million viewers in the demo was the NCAA Tournament title game.

    Overall, between 55% and 61% of the audience for the NBA Finals was from the African American, Hispanic or Asian demographic. The series averaged nearly 10.2 million viewers across the three demographics, compared to an average of 12.1 million for the other six events combined.


    Other than the NBA Finals, the event with the largest minority audience was the NCAA Tournament Final Four, which averaged 4.2 million viewers across the three demographics. The Final Four had a healthy percentage of African American viewers (14-15%), but lagged behind among Hispanic (4-5%) and Asian (4%) viewers. The Bowl Championship Series also had solid African American representation (8-12%), but less impressive numbers among Hispanics (2-6%) and Asians (2-3%).

    Of note, the Louisville/Michigan NCAA title game attracted more viewers in the African American, Hispanic and Asian demographics than the Alabama/Notre Dame BCS title game — even though the BCS game had nearly three million more viewers overall.

    In an encouraging result for tennis, the U.S. Open singles finals had a strong percentage of African American viewers. For the women’s final, which featured Serena Williams, African Americans made up 28% of the audience. The demo made up 13% of the audience for the Rafael Nadal/Novak Djokovic men’s final, also a good percentage. The Hispanic and Asian demographics each made up just 6-7% of the audience, but that at least compares favorably to the Final Four and BCS.

    The World Series was one of only two events in which the Hispanic demographic made up a larger percentage of the audience than African Americans, but the numbers were not exactly large — between 8% and 10%. African Americans made up just 6-7% of the audience for each World Series game, and Asians just 3%. Overall, the three demos made up just 16-20% of the audience for each game.

    The Stanley Cup Final was an especially weak performer among minority viewers. African Americans made up between 1% and 5% of the audience for each game, Hispanics made up between 2% and 6%, and Asian viewers made up between 3% and 4%. Overall, the demographics made up just 6-13% of the audience for each game, making the Stanley Cup Final easily the least diverse sporting event examined.

    Full data on race is available on the following page. Previous ‘demo reel’ posts are available here: age/income and gender.

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    Administrator Unclebuck's Avatar
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    Default Re: Except for NBA, not much diversity in Sports TV audience

    Here is link to a chart of a complete breakdown for each game.

    http://www.sportsmediawatch.com/2014...tv-audience/2/

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    Administrator Unclebuck's Avatar
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    Default Re: Except for NBA, not much diversity in Sports TV audience

    Here is a re-cap an overview of all this and why it matter. it is rather striking the difference between college basketball and the NBA.

    http://www.sportsmediawatch.com/2014...-demographics/

    Demo Reel: Final Thoughts on Sports TV Demographics

    few thoughts on sports TV viewership after the “Demo Reel” series.

    The NBA is in Great Shape

    • The NBA Finals was the youngest-skewing event of those examined and the most diverse. No other event had a larger percentage of Hispanics, Asians, kids 2-17, or adults 18-34, and only the WNBA Finals attracted a comparable percentage of African Americans. On average, more than a quarter of the audience for the series was made up of minority viewers under the age of 35. Overall, the NBA Finals was the second-most viewed event of those examined, trailing only the Final Four — which had an older, less diverse audience (more on that next). The only downside? The NBA Finals had the second-smallest median income of any event examined, ahead of only the WNBA Finals.


    The NBA/College Hoops Divide

    • It is striking to see just how different the audiences are for the NBA Finals and Final Four, two events that on the surface are fairly similar. The median age for the Final Four was nearly a decade older than that of the NBA Finals, and the audience for the games was dramatically less diverse — just 23% of the Final Four audience was African American, Hispanic or Asian, compared to 58% of the NBA Finals audience. The Final Four also attracted a more affluent audience than the NBA Finals. Despite the obvious divide between the two events, they averaged similar numbers in 2013 — 18.3* million for the Final Four and 17.7 million for the NBA.


    The NHL is Advertiser Friendly



    • The NHL may not have the numbers of the other leagues, but it skewed younger than every event but the NBA and had the most affluent audience of the events examined. Advertisers thirst for young audiences with disposable income, and the NHL would be in great shape if it could attract more viewers. One problem — 2013 was an unusually good year for the league, and the numbers may drop back to Earth this season. Another problem — the Stanley Cup Final had the least diversity of any event examined.

    Tennis, or at Least the U.S. Open, is More Diverse Than Thought


    • Despite the perception of tennis as not being particularly diverse, only the NBA and WNBA Finals had a larger percentage of minority viewers than the U.S. Open singles finals among the events examined. More than a third of the audience for the singles finals was African American, Hispanic or Asian. For the Serena Williams/Victoria Azarenka women’s final, a full 41% of the audience was made up of minority viewers. For the Rafael Nadal/Novak Djokovic men’s final, the percentage was a smaller — but still impressive — 27%.

    Maybe the World Series Really Has Lost a Generation


    • It is almost cliche to suggest that Major League Baseball has lost younger viewers, but the numbers for the 2013 World Series were still notable — nearly half the audience was over the age of 55, and the series’ median age hovered in the mid-50s. Combine that with a fairly non-diverse audience, and the Fall Classic does not appear to be in great shape.

    Sports TV is Not a Man’s World


    • Yes, men watch sporting events in greater numbers than do women, but female viewers consistently made up more than a third of the audience for the events examined. Considering the virtual absence of women in substantive roles on sports telecasts — only a select few have moved beyond the sidelines — it would seem that the networks are out of touch with their viewers.

    * 18.3M viewers for the Final Four is approximate, not official. CBS/Turner Sports does not release averages for the three-game Final Four.

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    Default Re: Except for NBA, not much diversity in Sports TV audience

    I'm not sure including 2-year olds in their numbers is right, but interesting nonetheless.

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    Default Re: Except for NBA, not much diversity in Sports TV audience

    Quote Originally Posted by Unclebuck View Post
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    The NBA/College Hoops Divide

    • It is striking to see just how different the audiences are for the NBA Finals and Final Four, two events that on the surface are fairly similar. The median age for the Final Four was nearly a decade older than that of the NBA Finals, and the audience for the games was dramatically less diverse — just 23% of the Final Four audience was African American, Hispanic or Asian, compared to 58% of the NBA Finals audience. The Final Four also attracted a more affluent audience than the NBA Finals. Despite the obvious divide between the two events, they averaged similar numbers in 2013 — 18.3* million for the Final Four and 17.7 million for the NBA.
    Interesting. This explains a lot. Back when the Pacers were having attendance problems, this idea was talked about a lot as a factor in Indiana (where high school and college hoops are super popular).

    The audiences do seem to be pretty different. Anecdotally I've run into this as well, my dad is a big Duke fan and watches college ball all the time but almost never watches the NBA. OTOH I rarely watch college ball except for the NCAA tournament.

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    Default Re: Except for NBA, not much diversity in Sports TV audience

    Quote Originally Posted by rabid View Post
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    Interesting. This explains a lot. Back when the Pacers were having attendance problems, this idea was talked about a lot as a factor in Indiana (where high school and college hoops are super popular).

    The audiences do seem to be pretty different. Anecdotally I've run into this as well, my dad is a big Duke fan and watches college ball all the time but almost never watches the NBA. OTOH I rarely watch college ball except for the NCAA tournament.
    I love basketball in general, the NBA is hands down the best form of the game IMO. The difference talent is just insane. With that said I prefer watching college basketball this year and am slowly morphing into a college first watcher, and leaning to getting into the college game instead of the NBA(in terms of my career). I still watch every Pacer game and normally try to watch an NBA game each day(even though I haven't really been able to this year). I have kind of flipped my watching style (I watch 2-3 college games a day and if I am lucky I watch some NBA). I use to wait and watch all of my college tape during the dry period in the summer. I hate running into people who say they love college because it is "purer" basketball that is just horse **** even worse is the people who say the players play for the "spirit" of the game in college.

    I still think HS hoops is the best in Indiana I love watching the top teams play, but I find it an inefficient use of my time. I could watch many games on TV instead of just watching one HS game live.


    With that said I know plenty of people like your Dad who say they love college, but hate the NBA. I just don't get how that can be possible I just shake my head.

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    Default Re: Except for NBA, not much diversity in Sports TV audience

    Quote Originally Posted by pacer4ever View Post
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    With that said I know plenty of people like your Dad who say they love college, but hate the NBA. I just don't get how that can be possible I just shake my head.
    It's always baffled me too. I honestly don't get it, the only thing I can think of is that they've never even tried watching the NBA. If you're a basketball fan I don't understand how you'd write off the best level of it in the world. I love college ball but the product is so inferior it's nuts, over half the time it's just flat out bad basketball. I mean, I guess I could think of some reasons, but this isn't the place to discuss it I guess.

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    Default Re: Except for NBA, not much diversity in Sports TV audience

    What always strikes me about anti-NBA people is the way their complaints are phrased very similarly, wherever you read them or hear them (they don't call traveling, there's no defense, the players are lazy). It reminds me so much of when LeBron did the Decision and the complaint was "It's not that he left Cleveland, it's how he did it." The same complaint, phrased the exact same way, over and over again. What that meant, to me at least, was that people had bought into a narrative but hadn't put any real thought into it. Which is why it's been possible for LeBron to totally flip his reputation by winning a couple titles. The narrative was structurally weak and folded when a better one came along.

    So what I think that means is that the NBA might be hurt by an outdated narrative now, the problems aren't structural like baseball (it's boring for younger viewers) and football (concussions).

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