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Thread: NBA steroid problem?

  1. #1
    It is ka Thankee sai Major Cold's Avatar
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    Default NBA steroid problem?

    http://sports.yahoo.com/nba/blog/bal...urn=nba-wp3662

    yahoo sports!

    Kelly Dwyer

    Derrick Rose and the NBA’s apparent ‘huge’ steroid problem

    By Kelly Dwyer

    Derrick Rose(notes) says that performance enhancing drugs are a huge problem in the NBA, in a snippet that made the pages of ESPN the Magazine a few weeks ago, and the reaction to his comment seems to have hit a fever pitch.
    And while we don't question Rose's knowledge of the inner-workings of this league, and what he's seen versus what we've observed and learned from afar, this does appear to be much ado about nothing. I'm hardly the NBA's favorite scribe these days, but it should be pointed out that this league has had strict testing for both drugs and supplements for decades, with ever-evolving guidelines, and that those who have been caught in the crosshairs with these sorts of things have been quickly sent to the sidelines. The league tests, and the few who use get caught.
    In one of those quickie Q and A's ESPN Mag likes to run every-however-often-they-publish, Rose was asked to rate the NBA's problem with PEDs on a scale from one to ten. He classified it as a "seven," and then dropped this:
    "It's huge and I think we need a level playing field, where nobody has that advantage over the next person."
    What matters here is context, and you understanding that I'm not trying to argue away on behalf of Rose and/or the NBA.
    Is "it" huge, or would the idea of PEDs being legally dumped into the NBA's bloodstream be huge? Was this question offered to Derrick as an idea, or as his take on what he knows about the league? Does he really think that the NBA doesn't have a level playing field because of these drugs and/or supplements? Or was he responding to a hypothetical that would come as a result of this uneven scope?
    So far, only middling types like Don MacLean, O.J. Mayo(notes), and Rashard Lewis(notes) have been suspended because of testing positive for this stuff. Others have been banished due to other chemical additives (be they recreational or otherwise), and if you want to get into some argument that allows for the idea that the NBA would knowingly gloss over some superstar who had tested positive so as not to keep him away from the national television cameras, then you're going to have to go to some message board for that.
    Because it takes two to tango, and several to test and then react, and if that were actually the case with [name your All-Star], then some doctor or lab assistant would have a million-dollar exclusive on their hands. Unless you think the NBA, which regulates and labels headbands, would pay off a doctor or lab assistant. And then … wait, why am I even listening to you?
    Rose denied through a team spokesman on Sunday that he even made the comments, and that'll be more than enough to fuel the fire, because nothing satiates a conspiracy theorist more than an outright denial spun through the professional hands of a team or league employee.
    Common sense, here, everyone. I'm on nobody's payroll save for Yahoo!'s, and I'm not out to save "my boy." Give it a moment's thought before prattling on.
    UPDATE:
    Steve Aschburner, as he usually does, clarifies my thoughts in a more articulate fashion, while adding a nugget taken from the Chicago Tribune:
    And the possibility loomed large that what Rose was asked, or thought he was asked, different significantly than what showed up on the final magazine page. That was the view of a Bull spokesman, who denied the quote on Rose's behalf that he was alleging a current, ongoing problem in the NBA.
    The Chicago Tribune also reported:
    One person close to Rose said the question was posed to him as "How big of a problem would it be if steroid use were rampant in the NBA?"
    Fitting answers to questions reconfigured and slanted later happens sometimes in print journalism. It's a shoddy practice, mostly undone these days by video or audio recordings of most interviews. But without pictures or sound of this Q&A exchange between Rose and the reporter, it's hard to know if what was asked —- and what was answered -— were precisely as portrayed in the one-page, graphics-heavy feature.
    Your read, so to speak, as to what happens from here.

  2. #2
    Release Psycho T pwee31's Avatar
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    Default Re: NBA steroid problem?

    Rose is denying he's said this by the way.

    Wouldn't be shocked if that was the case

  3. #3
    Go Colts! Shade's Avatar
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    Default Re: NBA steroid problem?

    Gotta love irresponsible journalism.

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    Member ilive4sports's Avatar
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    Default Re: NBA steroid problem?

    I think a lot of players use some form of PED's, but more for recovery than anything. The NBA has a grueling schedule. The level that these guys play at for so long is ridiculous.

  6. #5
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    Default Re: NBA steroid problem?

    Performance enhancing drugs are called that for a reason. It's not a coincidence Rashard Lewis level of play dwindled after he tested for it.

    Most baseball players lose it once they're off it, guessing football would be the same if you look at Shawne Merriman. I personally think Bob Sanders was on them, but that's just my opinion.

    It gives you an advantage, you still need the skill, but if it gives you an extra gear, or extra boost, it's not really fair, but I understand why athletes do it, to get paid, and achieve that level of fame, even if only for a few years

  7. #6

    Default Re: NBA steroid problem?

    Someone must have given D Rose a call late at night....

  8. #7

    Default Re: NBA steroid problem?

    Quote Originally Posted by pwee31 View Post
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    It's not a coincidence Rashard Lewis level of play dwindled after he tested for it.
    Maybe this was a joke I took seriously, but I thought it was mentioned somewhere that Lewis just took too much Viagra, which led to his high testosterone levels?

    I always thought that story was hilarious and didn't doubt it for some reason.

  9. #8
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    Default Re: NBA steroid problem?

    Quote Originally Posted by Major Cold View Post
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    If Rose said this, then, he is an idiot and the Bulls need to hire him some kind of (or a new) P.R. manager. Rose has also had loose lips since the NBA-Players union negotiations began. The league doesn't need this kind of blow or that type of investigation at this juncture.

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    Default Re: NBA steroid problem?

    Quote Originally Posted by DemonHunter1105 View Post
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    Maybe this was a joke I took seriously, but I thought it was mentioned somewhere that Lewis just took too much Viagra, which led to his high testosterone levels?

    I always thought that story was hilarious and didn't doubt it for some reason.
    I never heard that. It is a performance enhancing drug I suppose

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by DemonHunter1105 View Post
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    Maybe this was a joke I took seriously, but I thought it was mentioned somewhere that Lewis just took too much Viagra, which led to his high testosterone levels?

    I always thought that story was hilarious and didn't doubt it for some reason.
    As a physician, I can tell you that Viagra does not elevate your testosterone levels. It works by dilating blood vessels, allowing more blood flow to certain areas. So that report is bogus. Funny, but bogus.

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  13. #11

    Default Re: NBA steroid problem?

    Professor S is right.

    Viagra (and Cialis) increase blood flow and do nothing to hormones. In fact, Viagra was originally in clinical trials as a drug to lower blood pressure. It didn't come close to having the desired blood pressure lowering affects, since it seemed to operate mostly in dilating peripheral arteries (closer to your skin).

    But male test patients reported an interesting side effect...
    Last edited by Slick Pinkham; 05-23-2011 at 08:46 AM.

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    Member ksuttonjr76's Avatar
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    Default Re: NBA steroid problem?

    I guess it depends on what you consider to be "Performance Enhancing Drugs". Personally, if you can buy it in a GNC store, then it's fair game. As a side note, I believe basketball is a rare sport where I believe bulk is actually to your disadvantage. I know that I used to buy a lot of over-the-counter "drugs" to help me with lifting weights and muscle recovery when I used to play basketball 3-4 days a week and 2-3 hours per session at Purdue University.

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    Default Re: NBA steroid problem?

    Quote Originally Posted by DemonHunter1105 View Post
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    Maybe this was a joke I took seriously, but I thought it was mentioned somewhere that Lewis just took too much Viagra, which led to his high testosterone levels?

    I always thought that story was hilarious and didn't doubt it for some reason.
    Not Viagra. It was Extenze. And this is not joke. While the active ingredients in Extenze have been scientifically proven to be basically worthless in making anything but credit card bills larger, there is an ingredient in the formula, dehydropiandrosterone, that is on the NBA's list of banned substances. Lewis was looking for a performance enhancer. But it wouldn't have been much help on the court. Just after Lewis's failed test, the NBA Player's Association sent a letter to each member saying exactly what happened to Rashard, how much it was going to cost him (a ****load), and a list of other over the counter supplements which contained DHEA so as to avoid another potentially embarrassing and financially irresponsible incident. Evidently, OJ Mayo didn't read that memo as he was suspeneded for DHEA as well. No word from the NBPA on whether or not his suspension was related to Extenze also.
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    Default Re: NBA steroid problem?

    Quote Originally Posted by BRushWithDeath View Post
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    Not Viagra. It was Extenze. And this is not joke. While the active ingredients in Extenze have been scientifically proven to be basically worthless in making anything but credit card bills larger, there is an ingredient in the formula, dehydropiandrosterone, that is on the NBA's list of banned substances. Lewis was looking for a performance enhancer. But it wouldn't have been much help on the court. Just after Lewis's failed test, the NBA Player's Association sent a letter to each member saying exactly what happened to Rashard, how much it was going to cost him (a ****load), and a list of other over the counter supplements which contained DHEA so as to avoid another potentially embarrassing and financially irresponsible incident. Evidently, OJ Mayo didn't read that memo as he was suspeneded for DHEA as well. No word from the NBPA on whether or not his suspension was related to Extenze also.
    Good to know. That certainly seems plausible. DHEA was the substance that Mark McGwire initially admitted to using during the '98 season when he broke the home run record; at the time it was not banned by MLB.

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    Default Re: NBA steroid problem?

    Quote Originally Posted by pwee31 View Post
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    Performance enhancing drugs are called that for a reason. It's not a coincidence Rashard Lewis level of play dwindled after he tested for it.

    Most baseball players lose it once they're off it, guessing football would be the same if you look at Shawne Merriman. I personally think Bob Sanders was on them, but that's just my opinion.

    It gives you an advantage, you still need the skill, but if it gives you an extra gear, or extra boost, it's not really fair, but I understand why athletes do it, to get paid, and achieve that level of fame, even if only for a few years
    I agree about Bob Sanders, no way he can get that big without some kind of boost by drugs. Now his biceps are so large they keep ripping.
    Lance + Starting SG = Awesome

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