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Thread: Good JA Adande article: Small market, Part 1

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    Default Good JA Adande article: Small market, Part 1

    http://sports.espn.go.com/nba/column...Markets-110407
    ESPN.com
    JA Adande

    There's a short, nice video if you follow the link.

    Maybe the NBA should be thought of as the Starship Enterprise, with the storylines always revolving around the same few people despite a crew of hundreds on board. Kirk, Spock, McCoy, Scotty, LeBron, Kobe, Carmelo, Dwight. Of the more than 400 NBA transactions since July 1, seven changed the way we think about the league: the signings of LeBron James and Chris Bosh and retention of Dwyane Wade in Miami, the acquisitions of Amare Stoudemire and Carmelo Anthony in New York and the departures of Carlos Boozer and Deron Williams from Utah.

    The common theme was that the stars, the guys you see on the bridge of the Enterprise, went from smaller markets to larger markets. In a sport that can be dominated by a select few players -- 10 of the past 12 champions have featured Kobe Bryant, Tim Duncan or Shaquille O'Neal -- any hope for competitive balance resides in the ability of all teams' being able to land and retain those stars.

    "Many of us are dealing with the same issues, in that now it looks like free agents are saying, 'I want to play in a few markets,'" Milwaukee Bucks general manager John Hammond said. "If I were saying, 'There's 30 NBA teams, and we're the only team facing that obstacle'? Then woe is us. We have no chance to survive. I think we're the majority; we're not the minority."

    In this case, though, there might not be strength in numbers. The NBA is in danger of becoming a caste system -- or a "Star Trek" cast system -- where the bulk of teams can sell their fans tickets but not hope. It will shape the upcoming collective bargaining negotiations, in which teams in smaller cities will attempt to get on even financial footing with their larger counterparts. Some, including NBA commissioner David Stern, note that seven of the past eight teams standing in the 2010 playoffs were those that spent above the luxury-tax threshold.

    But do you know who won't be paying a luxury tax this season? The San Antonio Spurs, who have the best record in the league. Same with the Chicago Bulls and Miami Heat, two of the top three teams in the Eastern Conference. It's not just about money. Lifestyle plays a role as well. Keep in mind, James and Bosh did not get the maximum amount of money by going to Miami. Nothing in the upcoming CBA can move a landlocked Midwestern city to a warmer climate by the ocean. That doesn't exactly create equal opportunities around the league.

    "Fair chance?" said Marcus Barrett, a Charlotte Bobcats fan. "Nah, I wouldn't say a fair chance. Because all the superstars don't want to come here."

    I spent time talking with players, executives and fans from small markets and visiting New Orleans, Charlotte and Milwaukee, trying to see whether there was any belief the teams there could be competitive and discovering how they could make it happen.

    The answers didn't get any more brutally honest than Corey Maggette's.

    "I don't think so," said Maggette, who has played in Orlando, Los Angeles, Oakland and currently Milwaukee. "They can't compete with these [large] markets, you know?

    "It's just like saying, 'Milwaukee or Los Angeles? Where do you want to go? Where do you want to live?' It's tough, man."

    Sacramento is likely to see its entire team travel down Interstate 5 to Anaheim in the coming months. The Hornets needed the NBA to take over the team to keep it solvent. And the next Hall of Fame-bound free agent who jumps to Indiana or Cleveland will be the first.

    Less than a week before he was traded by the Jazz to the Nets, Deron Williams lamented that in Utah, "It's hard to get free agents. It is. You look at [the Jazz] the last couple years, besides Booz [Carlos Boozer], we haven't had any really big free agents. Most people either got traded or drafted. We had some great second-round picks that have blossomed for us, Paul Millsap, Jeremy Evans, some of those. It's hard. I mean, I've tried. I recruit the heck out of people."

    So did Jazz general manager Kevin O'Connor.

    "Do you make a call to those people?" O'Connor said. "Sure. If they say no, you move on. Those are excuses. You can win. If your ownership's committed, you can win."

    O'Connor traded Williams because he wasn't sure that Williams would stay in Utah once he had the option to become a free agent in 2012. Coming on the heels of Jerry Sloan's resignation, it felt like an especially crushing blow to the hopes of small markets. Many look up to Utah's ability to field playoff teams year after year. They were the model of stability, with Sloan occupying the head coach's seat since 1988 and Larry Miller repeatedly writing big checks since becoming the full-fledged owner since 1986. Miller died in 2009. Even longtime play-by-play announcer Hot Rod Hundley has retired.

    The Spurs are considered the model small-market franchise, winning four championships between 1999 and 2007, the result of stability plus ingenuity. (They were among the first and most successful at finding and incorporating foreign-born players.) Yet some will tell you they modeled themselves after the Jazz. And if the Jazz model can't be sustained, then what?

    The hope turns to the Oklahoma City Thunder, with their San Antonio-trained general manager, Sam Presti, currently among the four best teams in the Western Conference.

    The Thunder have some of the same revenue limitations. They decided they could afford to be patient. That meant no drastic moves even when the team got off to a 3-29 start two seasons ago.

    "Every team handles their business differently," Presti said. "For us, we've chosen to focus on trying to build a team that is sustainable and, in doing that, certainly have had to make some decisions that were very tough decisions. Understanding that at the time they were difficult for people to understand and to accept but also recognizing that for us to continue trying to build in a proactive fashion, they were necessary.

    "One of the hardest principles to assimilate into your process is that of restraint. And understanding that any time you're team-building and your goal is to build something sustainable that has a foundation and a strong base, there is a level of patience and an approach you have to take where sometimes you have to wait for things to develop as opposed to looking for quick fixes or things that might make you feel better."


    That's actually where small markets have an advantage. With everything going on in Los Angeles and with the championship-or-bust expectations placed on the Lakers and Celtics franchises, those teams have to do everything they can, spend whatever it takes to win now, or they'll be irrelevant. When you're the only major pro team in the entire state, in the Thunder's case, where else will the fans turn while they're waiting?

    And it's not about getting the fans to buy in so much as it is instilling belief in the best players. Oklahoma City has done that with Kevin Durant, who took a step in the opposite direction of the spotlight-seeking stars this past summer and committed to a five-year extension with the Thunder.

    When asked recently about the challenge of attracting other stars to join him in Oklahoma City, Durant said, "That's come to my mind. I guess that's the way we did it with the draft. They have to come if they're drafted. But if we continue to just play hard and be a team that comes out and is known for playing hard and playing together. Hopefully, guys that love to play basketball will love to be a part of it.

    "Big market, small market, that's something I try not to get into. Everybody else outside the game is going to ask me about it. But I'm here, I like it here, I love my teammates and coaches and the city. I don't have to worry about anything else."

    How many other players take that approach?

    It almost seems that small markets don't just need to hit the winning lotto numbers, they need to have the bonus number as well. They need to stumble upon a player with Durant's talent and his mindset.

    As Maggette said, "The players have got to be really sold on coming to a small market. The only way that's going to happen is if you turn out to be a LeBron James or a Blake Griffin and you're from Milwaukee and you really want to stay in Milwaukee."

    And we've already seen how that went with James in his native northeast Ohio.

    Eventually, free will and independent thought triumph. The quest is to look for rules and regulations that at least give the smaller markets a fighting chance.

    The fans don't understand the minutiae of collective bargaining agreements. The people I talked to were knowledgeable, up-to-date on what's going on in the league, well-versed in the history of their teams and the sport -- and they don't know how the league actually functions. They just know how they want it to be.

    "Even out the salaries," said Doug Dorrow, a fan in Milwaukee. "I know there's a salary cap [now], but a lot of people manipulate it ... however that works is way beyond me."

    From city to city, variations on the same theme kept popping up, similar to what Hornets fan David Boyd said:

    "I like the way the NFL is set up where every team has a chance to win the Super Bowl."

    Stern has hinted at the same belief, rhetorically asking reporters in December, "What do you think makes [the NFL] so competitive?"

    The answer is revenue sharing and a hard salary cap. The NBA can never be like the NFL, though, because the entire NFL television package is handled on a national network level, while the bulk of NBA games are televised by local stations. That's where the disparity kicks in. The annual local TV rights for some small-market teams don't even match the contract of the highest-paid player on their team. The Lakers, meanwhile, are about to create their own channel that will bring in a reported $150 million a year or more -- as much as $200, according to an SI.com report.

    Then there's the inability to attract major corporate sponsors who crave the prestige and visibility that come from partnerships. The Knicks' parent company, Madison Square Garden, signed a 10-year deal with JPMorgan Chase worth a reported $30 million a year. No chance the Memphis Grizzlies are getting a deal like that.

    Small-market teams can't afford to take a chance. Well, they can take chances; they just can't afford to be wrong. They can't compensate for an error by simply signing another player at that position. They also can't spend big dollars for small parts. The Lakers have Steve Blake at $4 million per year. He's not an essential part of their plan to repeat as champions, but they thought he could help. Because they're over the dollar-for-dollar luxury-tax threshold, his real cost to them is $8 million.

    The solution fairness is not as simple as adjusting for the income disparity by restricting the amount teams can spend via a hard salary cap. I asked a general manager who has worked in both large and small markets about the different strategies that come with each place.

    "If you have free-agent money, players will go where they have the best salary available to them," the general manager said. "If it's even, then the location comes into play also. Most players want to go to a winning environment.

    "In a smaller market, you may have to overpay to get someone to come."

    So if small markets want to get top-tier free agents, the next salary-cap structure needs to allow them a way to spend more on a player than their competitors do. How would they have the means to do this? That will have to come from better revenue sharing. But don't just write every one of the have-nots an equal check. Make them spend more to get more. In other words, the higher a team's payroll, the larger the cut of the revenue-sharing pie it receives. The union would be more likely to sign on to this arrangement because it would be a means to drive up salaries. And you might avoid some of the internal sniping in baseball, in which the big boys such as the Yankees and Red Sox accuse some teams of doing nothing but pocketing their checks and never spending to improve their teams.

    The next step is retention and or/compensation. One possibility is a version of the NFL's franchise-player designation, in which a team retains rights to a free agent for a year as long as it pays him an average of the highest-paid players at his position or 120 percent of the previous year's salary, whichever is greater. Since positions aren't as strictly defined in the NBA, the NBA would have to go with the maximum raise. In fairness to the player, it should be a larger raise than he could receive on the open market.

    Next, automatic compensation for losing a free agent, such as the Major League Baseball system that forces teams to send their best available draft pick to their free agent signee's former team.

    There are no changes to the league's setup that will turn bad decision-makers into good ones. And nothing will guarantee good results. Even under the current system, since 2003, the two teams playing in the league's smallest TV markets, the Memphis Grizzlies and New Orleans Hornets, have made more combined playoff appearances (six) than the two teams playing in the largest, the New York metropolitan area's Knicks and Nets (four).

    "It's not necessarily the market or the amount of revenue that a team has that proves to translate into championships," Hornets president Hugh Weber said. "You have to build a championship style and organization, with the culture and the mission and resources to back it up."

    You can have resources or you can be resourceful ... and still be at the mercy of where a man chooses to live.
    I like the 120% raise/franchise tag idea (not new, though I hadn't realized the 120% part before). I also like the MLB idea of sending your best draft pick to the team whose player you've signed away, but I'd like to know more about it.

    That can't possibly apply to just any player who changes teams, so what determines if the player is good enough to warrant this kind of compensation? A committee?

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    Default Re: Good JA Adande article: Small market, Part 1

    I kind of liked the "pay to participate" revenue sharing, meaning you not only want to stay under a cap but you want to stay as close to it as you can to get the revenue sharing. I think that will definitely help a harder cap fly with the players' union.
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    Default Re: Good JA Adande article: Small market, Part 1

    Next, automatic compensation for losing a free agent, such as the Major League Baseball system that forces teams to send their best available draft pick to their free agent signee's former team.
    He oversimplified this obviously( I can't keep up with all the compensation rules in baseball), but I like the idea. You wanna sign a type A free agent? You lose your 1st rd pick. Give some teams incentive to keep a player throughout his contract. Rather than forcing that team to make a trade before the player may or may not leave out of fear of ending up with nothing. Now they can evaluate whether or not its a better move to trade their player away or taking a pick. Not to mention that the player might actually choose to re-sign.

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    Default Re: Good JA Adande article: Small market, Part 1

    The solution fairness is not as simple as adjusting for the income disparity by restricting the amount teams can spend via a hard salary cap. I asked a general manager who has worked in both large and small markets about the different strategies that come with each place.

    "If you have free-agent money, players will go where they have the best salary available to them," the general manager said. "If it's even, then the location comes into play also. Most players want to go to a winning environment.

    "In a smaller market, you may have to overpay to get someone to come."

    So if small markets want to get top-tier free agents, the next salary-cap structure needs to allow them a way to spend more on a player than their competitors do. How would they have the means to do this? That will have to come from better revenue sharing. But don't just write every one of the have-nots an equal check. Make them spend more to get more. In other words, the higher a team's payroll, the larger the cut of the revenue-sharing pie it receives. The union would be more likely to sign on to this arrangement because it would be a means to drive up salaries. And you might avoid some of the internal sniping in baseball, in which the big boys such as the Yankees and Red Sox accuse some teams of doing nothing but pocketing their checks and never spending to improve their teams.
    I 100% agree that small markets need to overpay to attract free agents. I've never understood the argument that reducing maximum salary will level the playing field for small markets. It doesn't, because if the money is equally small, the player will simply choose the better location. No, the key, as the article says, is better revenue sharing.

    I'm not sure I agree with the proposal that spending more automatically gets you a larger share of revenue back. This might just encourage bad teams to go on spending sprees knowing they'll get their money back through shared revenue. And I can't imagine the richer teams being happy about subsidizing their competitors' upgrades. Maybe just requiring a minimum level of spend to qualify for shared revenue payments? Just to discourage the Sterlings of the world.

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    Default Re: Good JA Adande article: Small market, Part 1

    Quote Originally Posted by BillS View Post
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    I kind of liked the "pay to participate" revenue sharing, meaning you not only want to stay under a cap but you want to stay as close to it as you can to get the revenue sharing. I think that will definitely help a harder cap fly with the players' union.
    Yeah, I forgot to say that myself.

    Though I don't think it would be paired with a hard cap. I think it would work better with a cap more like what is already in place. It is, after all, rewarding spending. Hard to spend too much if there's a hard cap.

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    Default Re: Good JA Adande article: Small market, Part 1

    I'd almost bet money that was Donnie Walsh being quoted, by the way (GM who has been in small and big market). Fits, and I can easily imagine those words coming out of his mouth. It also fits in that it would be Bird's mentor saying it, and it's something Bird seems to strongly believe as well.

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    Default Re: Good JA Adande article: Small market, Part 1

    Quote Originally Posted by Hicks View Post
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    Yeah, I forgot to say that myself.

    Though I don't think it would be paired with a hard cap. I think it would work better with a cap more like what is already in place. It is, after all, rewarding spending. Hard to spend too much if there's a hard cap.
    I don't think the idea is simply to reward spending, I think the idea is to "punish" just pocketing the revenue sharing as profits. After all, if there's no cap and you share revenue with the teams that spend the most with no ceiling, the rich teams might as well just keep the money they'd put into the sharing pool.

    You're essentially encouraging teams to spend everything they are allowed to spend, not to encourage overspending (which would be counterproductive, really).
    BillS

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    Default Re: Good JA Adande article: Small market, Part 1

    I was thinking about this small market/big market issue earlier this season. The question is, can a team like the Pacers use an NFL team in a small market (Colts) as an example when comparing the ability to make additional off the court money for themselves? I mean, if I'm Larry Bird, the first thing I'm pointing out to potential FA targets is how much money and endorsements Peyton Manning has been able to make being in a small market. Are the NFL and NBA so different that the comparison can't even be made? My opinion is that even with the differences in the two leagues it is a fair comparison. Am I way off base here?

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    Default Re: Good JA Adande article: Small market, Part 1

    Quote Originally Posted by ChadR11 View Post
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    My opinion is that even with the differences in the two leagues it is a fair comparison. Am I way off base here?
    I don't think you're way off base, but Peyton Manning is also a once in a lifetime athlete/celebrity. His marketable qualities are so unique that I can't see it happening again, be it in a small or big market.

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    Default Re: Good JA Adande article: Small market, Part 1

    This Big Market vs Small Market controversy is a complete media construction. This is not a problem in the NBA. It's not within the top ten problems in the NBA. It is what the league wants people to focus on because it will force more concessions from the players union.

    NBA Players want to play for the Lakers and Heat because they're well run, championship winning franchises. If you put a well-run title contending team in Bozeman, Montana you'll get quality free agents.

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    Default Re: Good JA Adande article: Small market, Part 1

    Quote Originally Posted by King Tuts Tomb View Post
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    T If you put a well-run title contending team in Bozeman, Montana you'll get quality free agents.
    You've got to be kidding me.

    When it comes to big markets, you don't have to be incredibly well-run, you just have to have the will and desire to spend a lot of money. That's the difference between the Lakers and the Clippers. The Clippers could be nearly as good as the Lakers, but they refuse to spend the money. Their owner would rather have them be incredibly profitable on their balance sheet, which they are, as opposed being successful on the court, which they aren't and likely never will be, regardless of what certain Clippers fans say on this board.

    If you're a small market team, you have about a 15% chance of being successful in the NBA. How do I get that number? Because there are around three to four successful small market teams every year. And of those teams, one, San Antonio, is really the only contender. Utah (maybe not anymore) and Oklahoma City are good, but I would be shocked to see them even in the Western Conference Finals, much less the NBA Finals.

    You can follow the Utah model and be so-called "contender", although there was never a year where I thought Utah would win the championship, but it is really rare because there are only so many NBA coaches of the Pop or Sloan variety in the league and so many good GMs. To be a big market contender all you have to do is be able to spend spend spend.

    The point I'm trying to get at is there is no way I can conceive that Miami is a "better run" franchise than Milwaukee. Miami attracts free agents by virtue of its location. Pat Riley is there because it is Miami, Florida and not Miami, Ohio. They have a crappy coach and a crappy bench and their team is constructed in an ad-hoc way. They play in an ugly, unremarkable building.

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    Default Re: Good JA Adande article: Small market, Part 1

    Quote Originally Posted by King Tuts Tomb View Post
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    I don't think you're way off base, but Peyton Manning is also a once in a lifetime athlete/celebrity. His marketable qualities are so unique that I can't see it happening again, be it in a small or big market.
    Don't hold your breath. Athletes are becoming more and more charismatic. Sports media in high school and college sports is larger than ever. It seems every superstar is expected to preform on the field and in front of a camera. Needless to say, "there will be another." Whether he is in a football uniform or a basketball uniform - another perennial MVP and mega-marketable personality will arrive to a small market, perhaps ours, within the decade.

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    Default Re: Good JA Adande article: Small market, Part 1

    Quote Originally Posted by King Tuts Tomb View Post
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    This Big Market vs Small Market controversy is a complete media construction. This is not a problem in the NBA. It's not within the top ten problems in the NBA. It is what the league wants people to focus on because it will force more concessions from the players union.

    NBA Players want to play for the Lakers and Heat because they're well run, championship winning franchises. If you put a well-run title contending team in Bozeman, Montana you'll get quality free agents.
    And how did Bozeman get to be a contending team without any free agents? Did they suck and then get lucky that their lottery pick was high when a top talent came along? Did they then get lucky that said talent decided he didn't want to bail to after his rookie contract because he was playing in Bozeman?

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    Default Re: Good JA Adande article: Small market, Part 1

    Quote Originally Posted by Hicks View Post
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    And how did Bozeman get to be a contending team without any free agents? Did they suck and then get lucky that their lottery pick was high when a top talent came along? Did they then get lucky that said talent decided he didn't want to bail to after his rookie contract because he was playing in Bozeman?
    The same way as Oklahoma City, which is closer to Bozeman than LA. Top talents don't leave after their rookie contracts. The current CBA guarantees that players will be on their teams through at least one extension, about 7 years. That's long enough to build a championship contender.

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    Default Re: Good JA Adande article: Small market, Part 1

    Quote Originally Posted by King Tuts Tomb View Post
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    The same way as Oklahoma City, which is closer to Bozeman than LA. Top talents don't leave after their rookie contracts. The current CBA guarantees that players will be on their teams through at least one extension, about 7 years. That's long enough to build a championship contender.
    That would be...

    Quote Originally Posted by Hicks View Post
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    Did they suck and then get lucky that their lottery pick was high when a top talent came along? Did they then get lucky that said talent decided he didn't want to bail to after his rookie contract?
    BillS

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    Default Re: Good JA Adande article: Small market, Part 1

    Quote Originally Posted by idioteque View Post
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    You've got to be kidding me.

    When it comes to big markets, you don't have to be incredibly well-run, you just have to have the will and desire to spend a lot of money. That's the difference between the Lakers and the Clippers. The Clippers could be nearly as good as the Lakers, but they refuse to spend the money. Their owner would rather have them be incredibly profitable on their balance sheet, which they are, as opposed being successful on the court, which they aren't and likely never will be, regardless of what certain Clippers fans say on this board.
    The Knicks have spent more money than anyone in the last decade, in the biggest media market in the world. According to the logic of this board they should have won 10 championships.

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    Default Re: Good JA Adande article: Small market, Part 1

    I'm curious, what are these small market teams that are suffering from being in small markets? Looking at the standings the bad teams are at the bottom because they're poorly run, not because they're suffering from losing players to big market teams.
    Last edited by King Tuts Tomb; 04-09-2011 at 05:09 PM.

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    Default Re: Good JA Adande article: Small market, Part 1

    I hate when David Aldridge (who I actually think very highly of) uses the Thunder as a model franchise for small markets.

    Sure we could all be succesfull if we were able to draft the leading scorer in the NBA and then turn around and draft one of the top p.g. in the NBA while still having several other good draft picks from sucking for a good while.

    Would David's view of OKC be the same had Portland decided to draft Durrant instead of Oden?

    They just traded for Perkins, which I believe was smart, but he is going to want to get paid so let's see what he goes for.

    It's never just about getting a high draft pick (see Wizards) it's about getting franchise changing players with the high draft pick.


    Basketball isn't played with computers, spreadsheets, and simulations. ChicagoJ 4/21/13

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    Default Re: Good JA Adande article: Small market, Part 1

    Quote Originally Posted by King Tuts Tomb View Post
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    I'm curious, what are these small market teams that are suffering from being in small markets? Looking at the standings the bad teams are at the bottom because they're poorly run, not because they're suffering from losing players to big market teams.
    You mean other than Cleveland?


    Basketball isn't played with computers, spreadsheets, and simulations. ChicagoJ 4/21/13

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    Default Re: Good JA Adande article: Small market, Part 1

    Nothing intelligent to add here, just my opinion on this whole debate:

    I personally don't want to be on level with the Lakers or the Knicks. I like the small market disadvantage - it's part of what attracted me to this team in the first place as an 8 year old kid sitting in the nosebleeds at MSG. Sure, the big markets have a competitive edge, but it's not impossible to overcome, as we've seen in the past with the Spurs and the Pistons. It just makes the journey to the championship that much more rewarding. I'd much rather embrace it than complain about it. I'd rather be the team that builds from the ground-up with scrappy, high-character, quality players rather than throwing millions around for free agents every year like the Dallas Mavericks do.

    Roy wants to win. Danny wants to win. Darren wants to win. So does Tyler, Josh, Jeff. And they all want to do it here, as Pacers. And that's what I'm looking forward to as a fan. Next week, we play the big market Chicago Bulls - the team everyone's talking about, with the media-annointed MVP Derrick Rose and his free agent sidekick Carlos Boozer. I personally can't wait.

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    Default Re: Good JA Adande article: Small market, Part 1

    Quote Originally Posted by Peck View Post
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    I hate when David Aldridge (who I actually think very highly of) uses the Thunder as a model franchise for small markets.

    Sure we could all be succesfull if we were able to draft the leading scorer in the NBA and then turn around and draft one of the top p.g. in the NBA while still having several other good draft picks from sucking for a good while.

    Would David's view of OKC be the same had Portland decided to draft Durrant instead of Oden?

    They just traded for Perkins, which I believe was smart, but he is going to want to get paid so let's see what he goes for.

    It's never just about getting a high draft pick (see Wizards) it's about getting franchise changing players with the high draft pick.
    "News comes from The Oklahoman that the Thunder have signed Perkins to an extension. The deal is reportedly a four-year extension for $34 million. The Celtics, under salary cap restrictions, were only able to offer a four-year, $21.5 million deal. The Thunder could offer more because they were under the NBA cap."
    http://www.bostonherald.com/blogs/sp...-with-thunder/

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  28. #22
    Administrator Peck's Avatar
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    Default Re: Good JA Adande article: Small market, Part 1

    Quote Originally Posted by LA_Confidential View Post
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    "News comes from The Oklahoman that the Thunder have signed Perkins to an extension. The deal is reportedly a four-year extension for $34 million. The Celtics, under salary cap restrictions, were only able to offer a four-year, $21.5 million deal. The Thunder could offer more because they were under the NBA cap."
    http://www.bostonherald.com/blogs/sp...-with-thunder/
    D'oh that totally slipped my mind & I even knew that. Old age is a B!tch


    Basketball isn't played with computers, spreadsheets, and simulations. ChicagoJ 4/21/13

  29. #23

    Default Re: Good JA Adande article: Small market, Part 1

    Quote Originally Posted by Peck View Post
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    You mean other than Cleveland?
    LeBron left Cleveland because it was poorly run, not because it was a small market. They wasted draft picks, wasted money and surrounded him with average players. If LeBron was drafted by Miami and that team was as poorly run as the Cavs do you think he would have stayed there?

  30. #24
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    Default Re: Good JA Adande article: Small market, Part 1

    Quote Originally Posted by King Tuts Tomb View Post
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    LeBron left Cleveland because it was poorly run, not because it was a small market. They wasted draft picks, wasted money and surrounded him with average players. If LeBron was drafted by Miami and that team was as poorly run as the Cavs do you think he would have stayed there?
    Yes.


    Basketball isn't played with computers, spreadsheets, and simulations. ChicagoJ 4/21/13

  31. #25

    Default Re: Good JA Adande article: Small market, Part 1

    Quote Originally Posted by Peck View Post
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    Yes.
    Fair enough. To me it's a pretty obvious no but you're entitled to your opinion.

    Small market teams like the Spurs, Blazers and Pacers are continually good because they don't waste money or draft picks. Big market teams like the Clippers, Wizards and Warriors are continually bad because they waste money and draft picks.

    Being in a small market puts a team at a slight disadvantage. That disadvantage can be easily overcome by a smart front office. It turns into a major disadvantage when you add dumb owners like Dan Gilbert and Glen Taylor.

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