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Thread: Partially on-topic: An article about making the leap

  1. #1
    White and Nerdy Anthem's Avatar
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    Default Partially on-topic: An article about making the leap

    Technically it's off-topic, so admins can move if they so choose. But the core concept of the article is the exact topic we talk about in every draft thread ever, so I thought I'd try posting it here. Plus it's a really enjoyable read.

    http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2...urrentPage=all

    But for Shonka this didn’t help matters. It had always been hard to predict how a college quarterback would fare in the pros. The professional game was, simply, faster and more complicated. With the advent of the spread, though, the correspondence between the two levels of play had broken down almost entirely. N.F.L. teams don’t run the spread. They can’t. The defenders in the pros are so much faster than their college counterparts that they would shoot through those big gaps in the offensive line and flatten the quarterback. In the N.F.L., the offensive line is bunched closely together. Daniel wouldn’t have five receivers. Most of the time, he’d have just three or four. He wouldn’t have the luxury of standing seven yards behind the center, planting his feet, and knowing instantly where to throw. He’d have to crouch right behind the center, take the snap directly, and run backward before planting his feet to throw. The onrushing defenders wouldn’t be seven yards away. They would be all around him, from the start. The defense would no longer have to show its hand, because the field would not be so spread out. It could now disguise its intentions. Daniel wouldn’t be able to read the defense before the snap was taken. He’d have to read it in the seconds after the play began.

    “In the spread, you see a lot of guys wide open,” Shonka said. “But when a guy like Chase goes to the N.F.L. he’s never going to see his receivers that open—only in some rare case, like someone slips or there’s a bust in the coverage. When that ball’s leaving your hands in the pros, if you don’t use your eyes to move the defender a little bit, they’ll break on the ball and intercept it. The athletic ability that they’re playing against in the league is unbelievable.”
    When reading this article, I couldn't help but think of Sarunas. Brilliant in one setting, but completely unable to make the leap. And there's plenty of other guys that it applies to.

    So read it. What do you think?
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  2. #2

    Default Re: Partially on-topic: An article about making the leap

    Good read.

    In almost every field, sports, economics, personal relations, etc., people talk as if (and often believe) they know more than they really do. Some make the mistake of thinking that something that "makes sense" must therefore be true. Others put too much faith in analogies or the word of experts. Some think that if they guessed it, and it later turns out to be true, that they actually knew it before it happened. At worst, they believe something is certain just because they heard themselves say it.

    Sports drafts are among the most uncertain and unpredictable things going. Players drafted in the same spot from one year to the next will not be equally talented. The talent of players drafted in a particular year won't decrease predictably.

    Some guys like to point out how often a championship team has a top 3 or 5 draft pick on it, as if that were proof that top draft picks ensure championships. But many more teams with top 5 picks fail to win championships than win them. So it tuns out teams with top picks still have the odds against them.

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  3. #3
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    Default Re: Partially on-topic: An article about making the leap

    Quote Originally Posted by Anthem View Post
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote


    When reading this article, I couldn't help but think of Sarunas. Brilliant in one setting, but completely unable to make the leap. And there's plenty of other guys that it applies to.

    So read it. What do you think?
    you got me I skipped over it haha.

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