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Thread: Asking for a Raise...

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    International Counter bellisimo's Avatar
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    Default Asking for a Raise...

    Anyone have much experience when it comes to asking for a raise?

    I've never done it and usually just waited for the management to give the raise...but lately i've been feelin' like as if I've been doing a lot of things at the company and think its time for a raise....I was promoted back in July but my salary had not changed...i thought maybe if i prove that i can get the job done, then they won't have any reason to not increase my salary...

    however i feel weird asking for a raise...

    would it create a weird atmosphere between management and myself if they decide not to due to whatever reason?

    would they feel that i am no longer motivated to be working at the company?

    would they look for a cheaper alternative?

  2. #2
    Edge of Reason GO!!!!!'s Avatar
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    Default Re: Asking for a Raise...

    I've never asked for a raise myself but I know people who have in previous offices..

    I guess I'm kind of surprised they diden't give you a pay rise with your promotion..

    I guess a couple of pointers could be

    What are other people getting paid in different companys that do the same work with the same quals

    Are your collegues as harder worker as you ?

    I don't think it can harm you as such, if you present a solid factfull case advising managment of why you deserve an increase, the key is, provide some good support, documents, clients, projects..

    easy for me to say but you should try if your not happy, make an appointment, present your case and ask if they think it over...

    Just a starter...


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    Default Re: Asking for a Raise...

    Butter your boss up as much as possible.

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    Default Re: Asking for a Raise...

    I would never ask for a raise...that's really dumb.




    I WOULD DEMAND ONE!


    But seriously, if you can avoid directly asking, that would probably be best. I don't know how close you are to your boss, but I would try an indirect approach first.

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    Cheeseburger in Paradise Los Angeles's Avatar
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    Default Re: Asking for a Raise...

    When I was living in Bloomington, I worked for two years at a crappy hotel. I took on far more responsibility than I needed to, I did everything I could to improve the place. and it was for $4.50 an hour.

    Finally, after two years, I asked for a raise and the boss was very happy to give me one. He raised my rate to $5/hour. My face looked like this:

    He was VERY quick to tell me that I was getting MORE than a 10% raise and I should be happy because that's more than anyone EVER gets.

    I looked for another job and found a job landscaping for $10. That's well over a 100% raise. I couldn't believe I wasted a whole 2 years of my working life at that other place. Now that's a HARD lesson that I learned very well.

    NEVER stop looking for a better paying job. NEVER stop looking to improve your situation. ALWAYS keep your options open.

    Do well at one job and use your experience to work for a competitor for 50% better pay. Tell the old boss to match the offer. They never do. But keep their number. They might hire you back for ANOTHER 50% more in a year or two.

    KEEP THIS IN MIND - I have NEVER asked for a raise since that crappy hotel job - The key to making more money is job-hopping. That's the best way to increase your pay at the fastest rate possible.

    Next thing you know, in order to get a better job, you'll need to be certified or a different degree. Hello education, hello even MORE pay.
    “Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.” - Winston Churchill

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    Huge Member heywoode's Avatar
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    Default Re: Asking for a Raise...

    I'm not one to job hop to increase pay, because sooner or later, short stints at multiple companies will be a very telling sign on your resume. As long as when you move on, you're moving up, you can defend it, but many moves will simply seem like you have no loyalty except to money and you will be seen as a flight risk. Just my opinion.

    I have worked as GIS Manager for 5 years now. I have been with my employer for just over 10 years. When I got the GIS Manager position, the previous person was making 42K. I was making 28K. They offered me the job at 33K. It was a pretty big step up, and I'd never been a department head before, so I took it. Negotiated to 34K, but that was all.

    I got minimal raises over the next few years, and am currently making 36.5K. I just got a fairly big certification that is equivalent to a four year degree in the GIS field. GIS is a new enough technology that there wasn't a degree program beyond Geography when I was in college. The GISP (GIS Professional) certification is the equivalent of a bachelor's degree, and usually demands a fairly good jump in pay.

    Working for a county government, one could imagine how tight the funding is, and substantial raises are pretty unheard of. Not only do you have limited revenue to work with, but that revenue is usually shrinking and the cost of goods and services is rising. Add to that the fact that those who control the purse strings aren't usually forthcoming with cutting other areas to accomodate salary increases. Just a fact of life in government.

    I never asked for a raise beyond what was offered as part of the budget process because I knew how the game worked, and I didn't have any specific reasoning, other than I wanted to make more money.

    After getting certified as a GISP, and noting the salary guidelines that accompany such certification, I decided to jump into finding all the ammunition possible, and my goal was to have such an airtight case, they would have no choice but to agree.

    I researched like positions in counties with comparable populations, in all counties, and across the country and the region. I compared salaries and job descriptions across the private sector as well. I took into account job experience, skillsets, and job responsibilities. I had three different websites that did comparisons and advised certain salaries. I compared those numbers to the numbers that I came up with from comparing the same position as mine in other counties. The numbers were close enough to make my case for me.

    I knew that even if I made the most compelling case, the easy out for them would be to say, "We agree with you, but we don't have the money." I decided to find another way to fund my entire salary, outside the county general fund that was hurting. Not only was I not further hurting the general fund with a raise, I would be SAVING the general fund the amount of my current salary, and giving them the ability to reward me with a salary I deserved, and could prove it.

    I presented my entire budget to my three bosses, and then just told them, matter-of-factly, that I had requested a substantial pay increase and was prepared to defend my reasoning for doing so. They wanted to discuss it, so I laid out all the figures for them in a professional presentation and answered every question they had. For the record, I added 2K to the number that I wanted, so that I could come down and still be happy with my new salary.

    After reviewing my research, asking me questions, and being intrigued by the idea of changing HOW they paid my salary, they excused me from the room and talked about it for about 10 minutes. They called me back in and offered me a grand MORE than I asked for. Not only did I not have to come down the extra 2K I put in for, I got an extra grand.

    My salary for 2009 will be 26% higher than what I make right now.

    Three more stinking pays until I finally make what I'm worth.

    After all that, my advice is to do the research yourself, be brutally honest with yourself while you do, and if the numbers support you, go in with guns blazing. Be professional, not aggressive. Be insistent without being offensive. There is a way to demand a raise without being demanding.

    Got me what I wanted. Good luck!



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    Cheeseburger in Paradise Los Angeles's Avatar
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    Default Re: Asking for a Raise...

    I understand the "flight risk" argument. In a world where the employer holds the power, and there is a good deal of competition in terms of other people who can do the job, well everyone wants to make sure that the relationship will last a long time.

    But in my line of work, flight risk is something that very much works in my favor.

    3 a.m. phone calls. over 72 hours without sleep. Willing to drop my life, get on a plane in less than 6 hours and be gone for a month. Willing to take *literal* abuse from demanding clients. (I've been screamed at and sent home from jobs so many times it would make your head spin. I've had clients throw things. I've had team members with 10 and 20 years experience break down in tears.)

    And I do it all with minimal complaint and the do some of the highest quality work in my industry.

    Flight risk? You're damn right I'm a flight risk. If I'm not happy, I'm gone. And there's only one thing that makes me happy at my job. High-paying billable hours.
    “Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.” - Winston Churchill

    “If you can't be a good example, then you'll just have to serve as a horrible warning.” - Catherine Aird

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    Default Re: Asking for a Raise...

    Quote Originally Posted by heywoode View Post
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    I'm not one to job hop to increase pay, because sooner or later, short stints at multiple companies will be a very telling sign on your resume. As long as when you move on, you're moving up, you can defend it, but many moves will simply seem like you have no loyalty except to money and you will be seen as a flight risk. Just my opinion.

    I have worked as GIS Manager for 5 years now. I have been with my employer for just over 10 years. When I got the GIS Manager position, the previous person was making 42K. I was making 28K. They offered me the job at 33K. It was a pretty big step up, and I'd never been a department head before, so I took it. Negotiated to 34K, but that was all.

    I got minimal raises over the next few years, and am currently making 36.5K. I just got a fairly big certification that is equivalent to a four year degree in the GIS field. GIS is a new enough technology that there wasn't a degree program beyond Geography when I was in college. The GISP (GIS Professional) certification is the equivalent of a bachelor's degree, and usually demands a fairly good jump in pay.

    Working for a county government, one could imagine how tight the funding is, and substantial raises are pretty unheard of. Not only do you have limited revenue to work with, but that revenue is usually shrinking and the cost of goods and services is rising. Add to that the fact that those who control the purse strings aren't usually forthcoming with cutting other areas to accomodate salary increases. Just a fact of life in government.

    I never asked for a raise beyond what was offered as part of the budget process because I knew how the game worked, and I didn't have any specific reasoning, other than I wanted to make more money.

    After getting certified as a GISP, and noting the salary guidelines that accompany such certification, I decided to jump into finding all the ammunition possible, and my goal was to have such an airtight case, they would have no choice but to agree.

    I researched like positions in counties with comparable populations, in all counties, and across the country and the region. I compared salaries and job descriptions across the private sector as well. I took into account job experience, skillsets, and job responsibilities. I had three different websites that did comparisons and advised certain salaries. I compared those numbers to the numbers that I came up with from comparing the same position as mine in other counties. The numbers were close enough to make my case for me.

    I knew that even if I made the most compelling case, the easy out for them would be to say, "We agree with you, but we don't have the money." I decided to find another way to fund my entire salary, outside the county general fund that was hurting. Not only was I not further hurting the general fund with a raise, I would be SAVING the general fund the amount of my current salary, and giving them the ability to reward me with a salary I deserved, and could prove it.

    I presented my entire budget to my three bosses, and then just told them, matter-of-factly, that I had requested a substantial pay increase and was prepared to defend my reasoning for doing so. They wanted to discuss it, so I laid out all the figures for them in a professional presentation and answered every question they had. For the record, I added 2K to the number that I wanted, so that I could come down and still be happy with my new salary.

    After reviewing my research, asking me questions, and being intrigued by the idea of changing HOW they paid my salary, they excused me from the room and talked about it for about 10 minutes. They called me back in and offered me a grand MORE than I asked for. Not only did I not have to come down the extra 2K I put in for, I got an extra grand.

    My salary for 2009 will be 26% higher than what I make right now.

    Three more stinking pays until I finally make what I'm worth.

    After all that, my advice is to do the research yourself, be brutally honest with yourself while you do, and if the numbers support you, go in with guns blazing. Be professional, not aggressive. Be insistent without being offensive. There is a way to demand a raise without being demanding.

    Got me what I wanted. Good luck!
    GIS is awesome and a great skill to have. I learned basic GIS in college and it is offered as a minor at my alma mater (George Washington University) and every student who takes any geography class at least learns a little bit of it. It is actually pretty fun!

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    Huge Member heywoode's Avatar
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    Default Re: Asking for a Raise...

    Quote Originally Posted by dcpacersfan View Post
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    GIS is awesome and a great skill to have. I learned basic GIS in college and it is offered as a minor at my alma mater (George Washington University) and every student who takes any geography class at least learns a little bit of it. It is actually pretty fun!
    It is very rewarding for me. I hope at some point in their lives, everyone has a job that they love, they are proud of, and that they know contributes to so many different levels of society.

    I say often that I was born to do this job. I mean it. I will never work in another industry for the rest of my life.

    If you can minor in GIS, dc, I would do it. If you think it is fun to learn in college, you should try it in the real world where the work you do makes a WORLD of difference. I can't describe the feeling I feel when people tell me they couldn't survive without GIS and what I do every day. Sure makes it easy to get out of bed in the morning!

    LA, that is awesome! I would say that my argument about flight risk does not apply to you. I'm sure there are some niches out there that fall in the same category as you. That is excellent that you are the kind of person who can deal with the negatives in your job and use it to your advantage. Good man!



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    Default Re: Asking for a Raise...

    Heywoode I would love to have your job. I love geography.

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    Fear my small avatar Gyron's Avatar
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    Default Re: Asking for a Raise...

    That is one damn impressive way to get a raise Heywoode. Excellent approach.

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    Default Re: Asking for a Raise...

    I have been at two different jobs and asked for raises. My current job I asked for a raise when the national minimum wage increased to be compensated on the same scale and they couldnt argue so I got the raise.

    The other job I started a $12 an hour, worked for a few months and told them I wanted $15. Took a day for the boss to talk to the higher ups but it was approved, then I was moved to a different department and i told them that I would want a raise to $18 for doing the extra work and they put me on a one month probation and when I finished the month I went back in and asked for the $18 and it was approved.

    The job I am at now I should be making more and I know I should, but it is a hassle to ask for more, plus I just like being forgotten about at my company so that they dont ask me to do more. And I will be leaving this job in the new year and they know it so I think that if I ask for a raise now they will either 1) say no 2) say no and look for someone else to work my shift. I should be making at least $2/hour more than what I am. In fact this rant is making me want to do something about it.

    I will check the managers schedules and email one of them about it. Done and done.

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    Default Re: Asking for a Raise...

    A RAISE....a RAISE??? We're talking about a raise?

    Most peole I talk with want me to cut my rate from 7% to 6%(just for them wink wink).....a reduction of 14.3 %. That 7% hasn't gone up in 12,000 years and yet my gas charge sure the #+$$ does, as does advertising, etc.

    And a bank just arbitrarily cut my deal from 6 to 5% and told us there was no negotiation on that. It's a short sale home so there is no one to argue against the bank...and the bank doesn't give a dern. (Yeah, I just love bailing them out)
    If you get to thinkin’ you’re a person of some influence, try orderin’ somebody else’s dog around..

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    Huge Member heywoode's Avatar
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    Default Re: Asking for a Raise...

    If anyone wants to see examples of excellent GIS websites, go here: http://beacon.schneidercorp.com/

    My site is Huntington County, IN.

    Wayne County, IN has their oblique aerial photography linked through Microsoft Virtual Earth's web interface and into their beacon site. Microsoft hasn't added Huntington County's obliques that we just flew this spring, but it is coming....slowly.


    Quote Originally Posted by intridcold View Post
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    Heywoode I would love to have your job. I love geography.
    The field is wide open, dude! Get some training and some experience doing some intern work, and I guarantee you can find a GIS Analyst position in almost any city with a population over 250,000 in America. Pay is reasonable too...


    Quote Originally Posted by Gyron View Post
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    That is one damn impressive way to get a raise Heywoode. Excellent approach.
    Thank you. Thank you very much.


    Quote Originally Posted by indygeezer View Post
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    A RAISE....a RAISE??? We're talking about a raise?

    Most peole I talk with want me to cut my rate from 7% to 6%(just for them wink wink).....a reduction of 14.3 %. That 7% hasn't gone up in 12,000 years and yet my gas charge sure the #+$$ does, as does advertising, etc.

    And a bank just arbitrarily cut my deal from 6 to 5% and told us there was no negotiation on that. It's a short sale home so there is no one to argue against the bank...and the bank doesn't give a dern. (Yeah, I just love bailing them out)
    Well, the actual PERCENTAGE hasn't increased, but home prices have....considerably...Although they are coming back down now...

    Sorry...
    Last edited by heywoode; 11-14-2008 at 01:27 PM.



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    Default Re: Asking for a Raise...

    I've learned that the only way to really get "a raise" beyond the 3-5% is to change companies.

    I've changed companies three times since 2004 and now make almost 50% more than I was making in 2004. Of course I was out of work for about 9 months. But in the end it worked out. Finally feel I'm making what I am worth

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    Default Re: Asking for a Raise...

    well instead of asking for a raise i decided to take a different route and talked about a bonus structure for me where not only will i be "motivated" but also reap the rewards for doing my work "properly"...so management said they'll discuss the fine details out...

    I've also tripled my salary by changing jobs previously...but right now I'm happy with the company, the people I work with...and my salary is relatively OK compared to the other jobs in the country...however there is no reason for me to not want more...so I asked

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