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Thread: Winning basketball: Top 10 Underrated basketball traits/fundamentals

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    Default Winning basketball: Top 10 Underrated basketball traits/fundamentals

    Way back in August of 2006, I started one of my favorite ever threads of my own creation on here about "overrated" things in basketball. Someone smarter than I am can link it if you wish, but here is a list of what my personal list was at the time:

    1. "Off floor chemistry"
    2. "Experience"
    3. The offseason coaching phrase "playing uptempo"
    4. "Time outs"
    5. "Halftime motivational pep talks"
    6. "Revenge" as a motivator.
    7. A players "confidence"
    8. Individual blocked shots.
    9. Made 3 point shots early in the game.
    10. The starting lineup.

    I might change or add to that original list today, but that is not what this thread is going to be about. Instead, I want to write about things/fundamentals/traits that I consider to be UNDERRATED in individual players and in an overall team and organizational perspective. Just like the many opinions that eminated from that thread, I hope this one creates alot of great discussions among us all. Here is my list as of today, with explanations of my reasoning for all:

    1. BEING A GREAT TEAMMATE

    All the Ron Artest drama being brought back into the limelight after his trade to Houston has this famous coaching saying coming to my mind again: "Great players don't make great teams, great TEAMMATES do".

    What makes a great teammate? Someone who leads by example, is professional, and who cares more about the team and his teammates than himself. Someone who cares for the group as a whole and the entire organization and its fanbase. Someone who defends his teammates in public and handles problems behind closed doors. Someone who takes pride in winning the right way, and who treats the game itself with dignity, honor, and respect. Someone who does his job consistently, who works hard and comes to play every night, and is reliable, steady, and can be counted upon.

    In other words, everything Ron Artest is not.

    I guess Houston becomes more INTERESTING with acquiring Ron-Ron, and they are unquestionably more talented. But Houston, nor anyone else, can form a championship nucleus when relying on a player so troubled, tone deaf, selfish, and untrustworthy as Ron Artest.

    It is almost a sign of everything wrong with the world if a player who is a great teammate by all accounts (Shane Battier) loses playing time to the mercurial temperamental Artest. Of course, being the true pro that Battier is, he will no doubt continue to be the consummate role player for the Rockets, because he understands the right way to be on a winning team.

    Want a prediction from me? Artest and the Rockets are winners early in the season, getting lots of attention and accolades. Artest in a contract year gets off to a great start on and off the floor......then the selfishness, attention starvation, and greed will set in, and whining about his contract or looking forward to free agency will set in, and the Rockets will be torn apart. "The disease of me" is the condition Pat Riley so eloquently wrote about all those years ago, and Ron Artest carries and spreads that virus every where he goes.

    2. CREATING A WINNING ATMOSPHERE

    Ive come to believe that there are many many ways to coach basketball from a strategic standpoint successfully. We all have our favorite drills, favorite schemes, favorite plays, and overall philosophy on how best to do things. But by far the most important thing an organization can do is to create a successful "atmosphere for achievement", where doing the right thing and achieving goals is encouraged and expected without distraction or problems getting in the way.

    Great managers/coaches/business leaders do this instinctually. They weed out barriers their employees/players encounter, and make winning and success almost a natural occurance. This is done by having a singular purpose and belief system that filters down all through the organization.....the being able to get everyone to buy in to what you are trying to achieve and in the path to get there. It's imperative that your leaders set goals, set the agenda, and then give the players the tools and structure to get the job done.

    This is sometimes done on the coaching level, sometimes the "culture change" must occur in an organizationa/school/franchise/city collective mindset. I had lunch with a long time college and professional football coach once who told me that, in regards to college football, that winning wasnt just up to the individual coaching staff or players, but that first an individual school and campus must DECIDE to be winners, and to make it a priority to do so. I believe that to be true.

    Creating a positive winning atmosphere.....so crucial. This goes from the concept of how to fill the arena, to the music played, to the press coverage, to every single thing that occurs involving the team.

    3. THE ABILITY FOR A PLAYER TO COMMUNICATE VERBALLY WITH HIS TEAMMATES.

    This is one of the very best things that I like about Roy Hibbert being a Pacer, because when I watched him on film I thought defensively he talked to his teammates very well during play.

    Communicating with one another on the floor is very difficult for many individual players and teams to do well, because it does not come naturally at all. Being a good communicator is a SKILL that must be practiced, just like dribbling, shooting, or ballhandling. A clever coach always works some form of communication into every drill or meeting he has, to practice this skill and to make his players speak to one another on the floor.

    I always tell players and/or their parents that all day in school, teachers are trying to get their sons to be quiet and listen. But in my classroom (the gym floor) I want them to both be great at listening AND talking, sometimes at the same time.

    But, it isnt enough to just be communicating with one another, you have to be communicating EFFECTIVELY!

    From my vantagepoint watching the Pacers mostly on television but occasionally at the arena, I don't think they do communicate all that well with each other. I see some talking, but I also see resistance and confusion, especially defensively. Some basic communication skill practice might help our team more than we know.....things like the basic teaching principle of the "sandwich" method of influencing people: Encourage, correct/make your point, end on a positive.

    I'll be watching T.J. Ford in particularly in October, to see how he communicates with his new teammates. I havent seen TJ enough to know yet if this is correct, but I have always had the impression that he was a quiet, non verbal type player. The Pacers lack a perimeter player with charisma and a talkative nature otherwise, so TJ will need to bring that communication leadership to the table.

    The best teams always lead the league in chatter on the floor, as communicating positive things while the game is in progress is always a sign of a team that is in sync and "together", and this skill is one reason why I enjoyed the Celtics play so much this past season.

    4. CONCENTRATION

    A very underrated skill in an individual player and an overall team. Like communication, this must be practiced and learned and maintained. What good does a player do for your team if he plays well for 90% of the time, but drifts off and loses focus for the other 10%? Your team must learn to play the entire game, they must not let fatigue or other distractions get to them, and they must do this all the time. Concentration is a form of discipline, and it wanders in all of us from time to time. But teams must learn that concentration is a talent that can help them defeat more naturally talented opponents, and how crucial it is to not give away games or plays or end of quarter situations etc. You can't win with people who do the right thing most of the time, you need guys who concentrate and care enough to do it every time, or at least as close to that as humanly possible.

    5. BEING RELENTLESS

    This probably goes hand in hand with the others. Most individuals and teams will crack under heavy pressure or stress or for some other reason. One of the very best compliments one of my teams can get from opposing coaches is being relentless in our effort, or desire, or execution, or whatever. I also love hearing a player of mine or my entire team being referred to as "cold blooded". Maybe that isnt a great term to be known as a human being, but for a TEAM trying to achieve something, that is an awesome personality to have on your side.

    6. SCREEN ANGLES

    Getting into the bread and butter startegy sessions with younger coaches is always a fun thing for me to do. I've found that almost no one coaching at younger levels puts enough emphasis on this small yet critical aspect of successful offense. The angle that you set a screen at on a defender (does your screeners back face the ball or away from the ball?) often determines whether a cutter will get open or not. Lots of coaches teach the "setting" of the screen (stance, opening up to the ball, etc etc) but leave out where the screener should be facing and his feet positioning to be the utmost effective.

    The Pacers really struggled from a screen angle standpoint under Rick Carlisle, particularly in his last season. When we had great talent individually it wasnt as much of an issue, but as his talent pool dried up, his lack of attention to these tiny details finally did creep up. Many of his set offensive plays created bad screen angles for cutters to come off of, which (if any one reading this wants to search for) was criticized on ESPN.com by Dr Jack Ramsey during that period.

    I think the poor screen angle teaching is very widespread by the way, and it is all over the NBA, college, high school, and youth coaching communities. I'm looking forward to the Olympic games next week to see some of the European teams try and combat our superior talent and athleticism with superior strategic moves.....and one of those moves will be to costantly make themselves harder to guard by being better screeners than our defenders are used to playing against.

    7. INDIVIDUAL PERIMETER DEFENSE

    Forgetting team defense for a moment (which I consider to be a bit overrated), a singular dominant individual defender along the perimeter affects the game so many ways it is unbelievable!

    Think about how many hidden ways a great point guard defender can help you. You can pressure the ball up court, causing extra fatigue for your opponent, limiting communication between the ballhandler and his coach, making teams run simply and less complex plays against you. You cause them to waste time getting into their sets, which eventually may lead to them having to make one less pass per possession. On a more mental level, it sets your identity as a team as one being tough minded, "relentless" (as I said before, an awesome thing to be known as), and unyielding.

    A great wing defender can deny a teams first pass, which almost all team offense originates from. A great wing defender can stop or slow down the opponents best player, freeing your other 4 guys to not to have to do that task collectively. A great wing defender wins you close games in the closing seconds more than a great scorer will, because great defenders don't have off nights. On a mental level, an awesome shutdown wingman can frustrate the opponents top gun, causing the other players on the floor to lose their rhythm and spirit, and to try and fill roles they are incapable of filling.....which often leads to dissension in the ranks, creating chaos and making the atmosphere of winning difficult to maintain for the opponent.

    8. PLAYING EVERY NIGHT

    It is one thing to be hurt, unable to play until you heal. That is part of sports, and it is something every team deals with. But you cannot be successful relying on guys who play, then sit, then play for a few games, then sit a couple, etc etc.

    No team can be win that way. You can have guys miss time, but it is impossible for your coaching staff and team to develop any thoughts of cohesion when your entire strategy and rotations change from game to game because who is available is always in doubt.

    This is where talent loses against reliability in my view. 80 games of a "B" level player is more conducive to winning than an on/off again performance of an "A" player. Someone once said that 50% of success in life is showing up.......your guys have to show up consistently and actually PLAY if you are going to go anywhere.

    Guys with nagging injuries constantly being nursed? It is very difficult to win with players like that, no matter how good they may be when they play for you.

    9. FREE THROW ATTEMPTS DIFFERENTIAL

    While occasionally at younger levels it is actually a positive coaching trait to have your team foul the opponent more than they foul you (it shows a tendency to be aggressive defensively usually), at the pro level, one of the easiest ways to win games is to get to the foul line more than your opponents. I think you can achieve this from either direction.....either concentrate on getting to the line alot YOURSELF, or to prevent your opponent from going.

    Our Pacers lost this category alot last season, which negated some of the other things they did well. In particularly, a point of emphasis for us this season needs to be to not get so many defensive three second calls, which cost us quite a few points last year........and had other disadvantages too, such as the stoppage of play allowing our opponents coach to call a better play, to be able to sub against us, to rest slightly, etc etc.

    10. HARD FOULS

    I am not advocating anything dirty or even close to it, but the Pacers could relaly use a dose of toughness and physicality inside. We lack an enforcer, a bruiser, who can set bonecrushing screens and can take a hard foul when necessary. We could use a LaSalle Thompson, Dale Davis, Rick Mahorn, Charles Oakley type guy to play occasionally in situations where needed.

    Teams have no one to fear physically on the Pacers roster.....that needs to change somehow, and we shouldn't be shy about admitting it or doing something about it.



    I'd love to hear all of your thoughts of this list, and to see what additions you all would make to it.

    As always, the above was just my opinion.

    Tbird

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    100 Miles from the B count55's Avatar
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    Default Re: Winning basketball: Top 10 Underrated basketball traits/fundamentals

    As always, a great read. I'd love to hear how to evaluate the screen angles. I'll be honest...I've watched basketball my whole life, but I haven't been "schooled" in it. A lot of what I understand, I understand instinctively. I could use some more tools on how to watch the game with a more critical eye.

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    Default Re: Winning basketball: Top 10 Underrated basketball traits/fundamentals

    So tell me TBird....how do you REALLY feel about Artest?
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    Default Re: Winning basketball: Top 10 Underrated basketball traits/fundamentals

    those are actually overrated compared to 2 I can think of:

    1. TALENT

    2. JOCK STRAPS

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    Default Re: Winning basketball: Top 10 Underrated basketball traits/fundamentals

    Quote Originally Posted by count55 View Post
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    As always, a great read. I'd love to hear how to evaluate the screen angles. I'll be honest...I've watched basketball my whole life, but I haven't been "schooled" in it. A lot of what I understand, I understand instinctively. I could use some more tools on how to watch the game with a more critical eye.

    Thanks for reading and participating, as always.

    I probably could have done a better job explaining what I mean in the original post, so let me answer your question now.

    Here are some general rules about screen angles/feet position when screening away from the ball:

    1. When setting a "downscreen", which is moving from the top of the court toward the baseline generally speaking, you want your screener's back to be to directly to the ball. You want your screener's "inside" foot (the foot closer to the lane line) to be the lead foot, driving your feet right between the feet of the defender you are screening, in order to "pin him hard". Driving your feet this way and setting the screen at this angle causes the defender to have move more to avoid the screener, creating more space for your cutter.....when the angle is wrong (as many coaches teach poorly), the defender has space to "slide thru" between the passer and the cutter. This in turn usually makes the cutter "fade" toward the baseline, making the pass longer and slower, and giving the defender more time to recover to a potential catch and shoot.

    One of my major pet peeves is Jeff Foster's inability to grasp this concept. Jeff does the exact opposite of everything I just described when setting baseline screens for people.....often to try and make up for that weakness he moves.......which only leads to either he or the cutter being called for an offensive foul.

    2. When setting a "crossscreen", which is moving from one side of the lane to the other, the same rules apply. The proper angle for the screener is for his back to be directly facing the passer.

    3. When setting a "backscreen" (a screen coming outward from the baseline to the perimeter) the proper angle is to have your screener's back facing the rim in a direct line.

    The very best team in the league at screening is by far the Utah Jazz, and it is probably why I enjoy watching them play offense so much from a teachnical standpoint. Their screeners get great angles, really play physically, then do the league's best job at "pivoting" off of a very physical screen, opening up to the ball and recieving a pass, taking advantage of a switching or confused defense.

    With a little bit better defense, Utah is good enough to win it all I think, starting this year.

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    Wasting Light Hicks's Avatar
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    Default Re: Winning basketball: Top 10 Underrated basketball traits/fundamentals

    For down screens, cross screens, and back screens, how do you teach players to properly pivot after correctly setting the pick?

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    Default Re: Winning basketball: Top 10 Underrated basketball traits/fundamentals

    When is the precise moment a moving screen should be called? When are you allowed to move?

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    Default Re: Winning basketball: Top 10 Underrated basketball traits/fundamentals

    Quote Originally Posted by Hicks View Post
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    For down screens, cross screens, and back screens, how do you teach players to properly pivot after correctly setting the pick?

    Great question. I wish I had some video to show you, but instead Ill just try and type it out....hopefully it will make sense to you.

    After setting a proper screen at the proper angle, the screener generally would want to make himself available for a pass. To do that most effectively, the screener needs to be able to turn in such a way that will prevent the defender guarding him from intercepting the pass.

    To do this, the screener can't just turn around in a normal way. Instead, he needs to "reverse pivot" (take his leg BEHIND his body and turn that way) to prevent the defender from being in front of him.....so he can recieve a pass with room to manuever.

    The same thing happens on an ideally executed ballscreen/roll situation. The screener in that case doesnt just turn and run to the basket, he is supposed to "reverse pivot" to pin his man behind him in a trailing position, then head to the rim.

    Proper footwork puts the defender in a bad position to guard you initially, and gives you the advantage.

    By the way, Jermaine O'Neal had particularly bad footwork in this situation. His athleticism sometimes let him overcome it, but he used to just "skinny turn" toward the basketball instead of reverse pivoting, enabling the man guarding him to recover better, and make it more difficult for JO to score. Jeff Foster has some of the same problems still today, which infuriates me too, except he isnt a scorer anyway so him not turning correctly to recieve a pass isnt as big a deal as it was when JO butchered it.

    Many youth players after they screen want to immediately turn their heads like JO did, and just turn around with no power, force, or strong base because they are anxious to see what is happening......their uncomfortableness (is that a word?) with playing the game while not seeing the basketball with their own eyes creates this issue.

    Carlos Boozer, both at Duke and especially now with Utah, is extremely good at this skill.Deron Williams often has the ball in the air toward Boozer after Carlos sets a screen before he even turns, knowing he will turn the proper way, recieve his pass and score in the paint against a slow reacting defense.

    It is all about the proper fundamentals and reading the situation. JO's offensive game had so much wasted potential........no one will ever know whether it was his own obstinance, lack of college coaching, lack of fundamentals as a youth, or Portland and Indiana's own lack of teaching skills and player development that hurt him in this fundamental skill set.

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    It is ka Thankee sai Major Cold's Avatar
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    Default Re: Winning basketball: Top 10 Underrated basketball traits/fundamentals

    How can our players use screens better?

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    Default Re: Winning basketball: Top 10 Underrated basketball traits/fundamentals

    While seeing it in front of me is still preferred, I think I can "see" what you are saying in my mind. Thanks.

    Oh, and instead of, "uncomfortableness," may I suggest discomfort?

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    Default Re: Winning basketball: Top 10 Underrated basketball traits/fundamentals

    Quote Originally Posted by Hicks View Post
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    While seeing it in front of me is still preferred, I think I can "see" what you are saying in my mind. Thanks.

    Oh, and instead of, "uncomfortableness," may I suggest discomfort?

    I'm like Jay Bilas on draft night.....I make up my own words sometimes.

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    Default Re: Winning basketball: Top 10 Underrated basketball traits/fundamentals

    Bilas' draft night performances are truly scrumtralescent.

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    Default Re: Winning basketball: Top 10 Underrated basketball traits/fundamentals

    good gods, number 1 has to be boxing out. After watching JO all these years... I sure hope Hibbert knows what he is doing. That is the NUMBER 1 fundamental that kids are taught in every good basketball camp in indiana, but yet it is such a weakness in so many player's over all game.

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    Default Re: Winning basketball: Top 10 Underrated basketball traits/fundamentals

    Boxing out is overrated in my opinion.

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    Default Re: Winning basketball: Top 10 Underrated basketball traits/fundamentals

    Agree with BR, consistent boxing out is key to defensive success and too often not given any shrift.
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    Default Re: Winning basketball: Top 10 Underrated basketball traits/fundamentals

    Up until fairly recently I'd never heard anything but good comments about boxing out. I'm still surprised there's a following that's against it. To me you should box out until the ball has hit the floor, then go get it. Of course if it falls right to you just grab it, but otherwise I'd rather pin the other team between me and the ball before I just run after it as opposed to making it a free for all.

    Actually, tbird, I view it like you were saying about setting bad screens on a pick & roll: If you do it right, you "pin" your defender behind you as you roll to the basket, but if you don't, they can slide quickly to keep up with you. To me it's the same with boxing out vs. not boxing out in terms of keeping your man in a place you want him to be before you run after something, vs. just letting him race you.

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    Default Re: Winning basketball: Top 10 Underrated basketball traits/fundamentals

    It is all about pinning your man and getting position. It should be a learnable thing. But it is rarely practiced.

    I played a year at college (nothing spectacular think worse than juco). The only reason why I played was screening, rebounding, and defense. If I was not so fundamentally sound I would have been watching from the stands. I say fundamentally sound, but it was more like more fundamental that others.

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    Default Re: Winning basketball: Top 10 Underrated basketball traits/fundamentals

    #1 - FUNDAMENTALS

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    Default Re: Winning basketball: Top 10 Underrated basketball traits/fundamentals

    Quote Originally Posted by intridcold View Post
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    How can our players use screens better?

    Another great question.

    In general, it is hard to tell if the Pacers have really good cutters on the roster or not, because our screen SETTERS have had such flaws in the past few seasons.
    I believe Nesterovic and especially Hibbert will be above average screeners for us, and Hibbert may be the best screener we've had since Dale Davis.

    I believe the biggest recipients of better screens being set by our bigs will be Mike Dunleavy and Brandon Rush. I suspect Granger might be a good cutter and reader of screens, but I need to see more of him playing with good screeners to be able to tell.

    To cut off screens better, our cutters need to fake better before coming off the screen, in order to set up the defender to be screened at a better angle. "If your man is playing you high take him higher, if your man is playing you low take him lower" is the general rule of thumb.

    By faking before you cut, it also by nature makes yourself WAIT on the screen to get there, which is a problem I see Granger having sometimes.....he takes off before the screen arrives, anxious and impatient. Stephen Jackson had this issue really bad too.

    But I'd say by far the biggest problem lots of our players have (and most players in reality) is that they STARE AT THE BALL TOO MUCH. Again, this is an anxiousness problem.....you should be looking at your man, reading him and listening to your screeners verbal communication so you know what type of cut to use and where to go on the floor before looking up to see where the ballhandler is.

    This is a key critical thing to understand you guys. Great cutters watch their defender, "read" him and the situation correctly and make the proper cut, in order to create the maximum space away from him.

    Average players/cutters decide where to cut and watch the ball to see if they are going to get the ball or not....the proper thing is to make the appropriate basketball move/decision/cut, THEN look up to see the ball.

    This really isnt that hard for players to do.....it just sounds harder when you type it out like this.

    So, in summary, to be a better cutter you need to :

    1. "fake your cut"
    2. "Cut lower to be faster"
    3. " watch your defender, not the ball"
    4. "keep moving, be relentless and persistent"

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    Default Re: Winning basketball: Top 10 Underrated basketball traits/fundamentals

    Forgetting team defense for a moment (which I consider to be a bit overrated)
    I disagree with this and I think your own "Being a good teammate" and "communication" disagree with it too. The whole point of those aspects on the defensive end are to create good team defense.

    My #1 view of successful ball is spacing. How you create it, how you eliminate it, and how you shut it down before it can even start.

    The main reason I like Rush is that he and Chalmers were both very good at leaning into each other's space in order to minimize the advantages a team was getting with screens and ball movement.

    I hate when "lockdown" defenders just stick with their guy no matter what when a solid angle and a bit of drift can close off a space and still protect their part of the floor.

    It's not just shortening rotation space, it's more the ease of passing lanes. Make a guy have to bounce it so it gets there slower and gives the post defender a chance to establish strong position (or lets a help defender get there), force a higher skip pass so a guy has to go up to get it and can't go right into his dribble, etc.

    Too often guys will let the play run smoothly if their man isn't directly involved and that makes it harder on their teammates.

    Plus JOB continues this view with his deflections emphasis and Brandon is outstanding in that area. Like McKey what you often see is that he'll cut down the momentary advantage, force the ball somewhere else and not get credit for being the guy shutting down the weaker opportunity the offense is forced to go to.

    A lot of blocked shots come from a guy trying to force the action in a situation that the defense can see happening, and that often means that something better has already been denied.

    Don't even get me started on denying post feed passes.



    Screens - Hibbert may be slow but he is a strong screener. If they can make things work with his slower game he can hurt teams. I do like his fundamentals.

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    Default Re: Winning basketball: Top 10 Underrated basketball traits/fundamentals

    Quote Originally Posted by Naptown_Seth View Post
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    I hate when "lockdown" defenders just stick with their guy no matter what when a solid angle and a bit of drift can close off a space and still protect their part of the floor.
    Yes - we had a certain former DPOY that wasn't very good at "help"/ "team" defense. At times, he'd still be locking his guy down 25 feet from the basket instead of helping and then he'd want everybody to pat him on the back for his individual effort (often while pointing out the defensive lapses of his teammates, just to take the situation from bad to worse.)
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    Default Re: Winning basketball: Top 10 Underrated basketball traits/fundamentals

    Quote Originally Posted by Burtrem Redneck View Post
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    good gods, number 1 has to be boxing out. After watching JO all these years... I sure hope Hibbert knows what he is doing. That is the NUMBER 1 fundamental that kids are taught in every good basketball camp in indiana, but yet it is such a weakness in so many player's over all game.
    Like I've said many times before, one of the greatest coaches ever, John Wooden, didn't believe in boxing out. He wanted all 5 guys to go to the ball, instead of waiting back for it.

    I think we all would agree that Foster is an excellent rebounder, and he doesn't box out hardly at all, if ever. He gets away with it by with pure instincts. Some players just understand how/where the ball is going to come off and get in position. You really have to want the ball to get by doing that as well.


    IMHO, there isn't a set way to rebound. Each player should be coached on their ability. Foster's production would go down if he boxed out, but JO's would go up.

  23. #23
    Wasting Light Hicks's Avatar
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    Default Re: Winning basketball: Top 10 Underrated basketball traits/fundamentals

    I think it's okay to disagree with anyone, including John Wooden. Let's not make Legends out to be infallible. And really, I'm not trying to say he's wrong, just that I disagree and think there's another way. One I happen to think is better.

  24. #24
    Jimmy did what Jimmy did Bball's Avatar
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    Default Re: Winning basketball: Top 10 Underrated basketball traits/fundamentals

    I still say John Wooden wanted his players to find a man, seal him, and THEN go get the ball. That's still blocking out.

    -Bball
    O'Brien has been fired! Yay! What took so long?

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    "A player who makes a team great is more valuable than a great player. Losing yourself in the group, for the good of the group, thatís teamwork."

    -John Wooden

  25. #25
    It Might Be a Soft J JayRedd's Avatar
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    Default Re: Winning basketball: Top 10 Underrated basketball traits/fundamentals

    Indeed, Bball.

    But the more athleticism there is involved, the more you have to be an "active rebounder" instead of waiting for it to come towards you. Boxing out is absolutely paramount to rebounding at lower levels up to and including the NCAA. And, yes, it is very necessary in the NBA as well.

    But, it's much more likely that a 6'3" high school PF will be able to block out the 6'2" PF that he's fighting with and secure the ball as it comes down from the height of, say, 12 feet after clanging of the iron than it is for Jeff Foster to expect to end up with the same ball if Amare Stoudamire is anywhere nearby. Sure, it's nice to pin Amare back a little bit and improve your position (and worsen his) before leaping, but if you don't break that seal quickly and attack the ball as it comes off the rim, a guy like Amare will just jump up and pluck it out the sky.

    Essentially, when guys nearby can literally touch a spot 18 inches above the rim, you can't spend much time waiting around for the ball to hopefully come your way if you expect to be a good rebounder. At the NBA level of physical heights and vertical leaps, about half the rebounds are decided in the air above the rim. Not so much in any other league. That's the difference between boxing out being an actual end-all-be-all of rebounding at lower levels and a fundamental that former high school glory days reminiscers tend to overrate in the NBA.
    Last edited by JayRedd; 08-04-2008 at 04:53 PM.
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