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Thread: McNabb: "Peyton (and other white QBs) doesn't get criticized as much as I do."

  1. #26
    Member McClintic Sphere's Avatar
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    Default Re: McNabb: "Peyton (and other white QBs) doesn't get criticized as much as I do."

    For a pretty laid-back dude that's never been in trouble away from football, McNabb always seems to attract controversy, whether with T.O., the puking, Rush Limbaugh, this, etc.

    I doubt the likes of Rex Grossman or Chad Pennington are going to be throwing him a pity party anytime soon, though. They probably had a good chuckle about those comments.

  2. #27
    Member BoomBaby31's Avatar
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    Default Re: McNabb: "Peyton (and other white QBs) doesn't get criticized as much as I do."

    I guess Rex, and Chad Pennington are the blackest guys in the league.

    Chad Pennington had a good year last year, actually a great year in comparison to the teams ability. He comes this year and gets blown out by one of the best teams ever (if not thee) and they want him gone.

    McNabb went like 28-46 and got beat by the Redskins no wonder he has to pull the race card.

  3. #28
    Member tdubb03's Avatar
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    Default Re: McNabb: "Peyton (and other white QBs) doesn't get criticized as much as I do."

    Quote Originally Posted by brichard View Post
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    IU has a pretty good QB in Kellen LEWIS as well.
    Fixed.

    I get the feeling McNabb's been pampered his entire life. His dad's had to come to his defense multiple times, most recently when they drafted Kevin Kolb with their #1 pick. Not his agent, not his GM, not even his wife, his dad. You're 29ish Donovan, fight your own battles.

  4. #29

    Default Re: McNabb: "Peyton (and other white QBs) doesn't get criticized as much as I do."

    While I don't think black quarterbacks are criticized more than white QBs, I think they're often criticized in a different, sometimes more harsh way. Donovan McNabb is, when healthy, the third best quarterback in the NFL. The way he's talked about you'd think he was some back-up scrub.

    I have the utmost respect for McNabb. He's a tough competitor, a great player but also a good, intelligent guy. I'm amazed that he hasn't caught on more as a fan favorite.

    If this was coming from Daunte Culpepper I'd blow it off. McNabb? He's worth listening to. But I'm also extremely keen to discussing race in sports. It's one of the reasons I'm so drawn to sports; the contrast of largely black leagues with largely white fan bases. It seems like most people don't want to discuss it, or brush it aside but it's always a topic I like to discuss.

  5. #30
    Rebound King Kstat's Avatar
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    Default Re: McNabb: "Peyton (and other white QBs) doesn't get criticized as much as I do."

    Eventually, a guy (most likely black) is going to come along with the mobility of Vick and an arm and football IQ comparable to Peyton Manning, and be the best QB of all time or at least rank right up there.
    Uh...John Elway was black?

    It wasn't about being the team everyone loved, it was about beating the teams everyone else loved.

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  6. #31
    The Last Great Pacer BlueNGold's Avatar
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    Default Re: McNabb: "Peyton (and other white QBs) doesn't get criticized as much as I do."

    Quote Originally Posted by Kstat View Post
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    Uh...John Elway was black?
    Uh...John Elway was mobile?

  7. #32

    Default Re: McNabb: "Peyton (and other white QBs) doesn't get criticized as much as I do."

    Of course he was.

  8. #33
    Member Isaac's Avatar
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    Default Re: McNabb: "Peyton (and other white QBs) doesn't get criticized as much as I do."

    Quote Originally Posted by BlueNGold View Post
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    Uh...John Elway was mobile?
    He absolutely was.

  9. #34

    Default Re: McNabb: "Peyton (and other white QBs) doesn't get criticized as much as I do."

    Steve Young was mobile and not black.

    I would love to hear the fall out of a white player being accused of playing to black by white clergy.

    I would agree McNabb is critized more by Blacks than White players are. However I think that speaks more to the dynamics of the Black community than society at large.
    "They could turn out to be only innocent mathematicians, I suppose," muttered Woevre's section officer, de Decker.

    "'Only.'" Woevre was amused. "Someday you'll explain to me how that's possible. Seeing that, on the face of it, all mathematics leads, doesn't it, sooner or later, to some kind of human suffering."

  10. #35

    Default Re: McNabb: "Peyton (and other white QBs) doesn't get criticized as much as I do."

    I kinda feel for McNabb. I don't know that Philly's problems are all his fault.I think he is still struggling to recover from his injury.

    In sports today we get on and off the bandwagons to quick. People react way to fast. Give McNabb some time and maybe he will be fine. Or maybe the injury has hurt his game forever and he will never be anything like he was.

    However when I think of QBs that take the most heat it is easily Rex and Peyton. Maybe it's because i'm from Indiana so everyone here is either a Colts or a Bears fan, but even after the Colts won the Superbowl there are still some that are critical of Peyton. And people will never shut up about Rex.

    I really don't understand where McNabb's comments are coming from though. Vick has taken a lot of heat (before the charges) but it's because the Falcons didn't win. People have been critical of McNabb and Culpepper since there injuries. People seem to love Vince Young.

    As far as McNabb "choking" in big games I really don't think much of it. People said that about Peyton granted McNabb made the Superbowl before and lost.

    I don't really think it's a matter of being black or white. It's a matter of winning and losing. You win, and everything is perfect. You lose and you need to be replaced good recent examples of that are ND and Michigan Football, Rick Carlise, and everything has been perfect with the Colts since the playoffs but boy when we couldn't stop the run and lost some games they sucked and weren't going to win a single playoff game.

  11. #36
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    Default Re: McNabb: "Peyton (and other white QBs) doesn't get criticized as much as I do."

    Maybe Donovan should try talking to Bill Russell before he opens his mouth again.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2007/09/19/sp...cw&oref=slogin

    The reflective rookie posed a direct question for the straight-shooting legend.

    Joakim Noah raised his hand and asked Bill Russell if he felt underappreciated while accomplishing all that he did in racially polarized Boston — 11 N.B.A. championships in 13 remarkable years — at the dawn of and during the civil rights era.

    Noah, the mixed-race progeny of French, Swedish and Cameroonian descent, son of the tennis champion Yannick, brought to Russell’s famously whiskered face a contented smile reflecting an appreciation for the depth of curiosity, for the opportunity to be engaged.

    “Quite true,” Russell said. “But you know what? It was really irrelevant. My father always told me that the most important thing is what you think of yourself. He had an expression about there being all these little red wagons that get pulled around and that it’s got nothing to do with me.”

    Who, then, better than Russell, in his gravelly voiced and informal, meditative manner, to lecture the freshly minted rookie class of 2007 about the wagon train of critics awaiting them — hauling around some legitimate grievances about the state of their sport but also, in too many cases, hurling familiar stereotypes and stones?

    Ready to hold them to unmatchable standards — as in the case of the injured and absent Greg Oden, already anointed as the next Russell — or to modes of idealized behavior existing mainly in sanitized versions of bygone eras that were televised in black and white but are seldom remembered in shades of gray.

    Think, for example, that N.B.A. pugilism began with the Bad Boy Pistons, or with Ron Artest rampaging into the waiter seats at the Palace of Auburn Hills?

    “We had fights in All-Star Games,” Russell said, competitive pride on his sport coat sleeve matching the gift from Commissioner David Stern, a ring commemorating all 11 titles.

    Think that the great Russell was above instigating a scuffle by explaining to an opponent, as he put it yesterday at the N.B.A.’s Rookie Transition Program at the Doral Arrowwood resort, “why they didn’t have a chance?”

    Think again.

    “Nowadays, they call it trash talking,” Russell told the rookies. “But see, that’s from the suburbs. In the projects, we’re talking folks, about things that are pertinent.”

    He got a few laughs, but pandering — particularly to the black players — was not his primary purpose. Not every rookie was African-American, or American, but the message was less about contrasting cultures, or the racial divide, than it was about keeping it real.



    “I tell all the kids — rich, poor, black, white — that you must be your own counsel,” Russell said in an interview after his talk. “We understand that we don’t always want to do the right thing, but what they have to ask themselves is, ‘Am I willing to deal with the consequences?’ ”

    In the final analysis, Russell told the rookies, more gratifying than working too hard to please the wagon pullers and ending up feeling like a puppet for the pundits, is “trying to honor yourself and your family.”

    Always implicit in Russell-speak, of course, is that family is tantamount to team, in his case the Celtics, for whom he would have endured a million bigots in Boston.

    Upon asking his question, Noah said he was surprised that Russell had not given specific examples of racism. “Not so much around the league,” he said, “but right in his own city, where he was a player, a coach, being a seven-foot black man.”

    Actually, Russell dominated at 6-foot-9 — two inches shorter than Noah, in a distant, very different era, but not so long ago that Russell has seen a team, other than the 1980s Lakers of Magic and Kareem, that he believes his Celtics could not have beaten.

    Some might have heard hubris in such conviction, but not Noah. He comes to the Chicago Bulls as a two-time N.C.A.A. champion at Florida, a player most willing to do windows, who said he already knew that Russell’s talk would be the overriding lesson of the four-day program that attempts to educate the rookies on topics ranging from gambling to felony situations to professionalism and etiquette.



    Noah also came to understand why Russell doesn’t recount past cruelties — why give credence to them when he long ago rose to a higher existential plane, allowing only Russell to define Russell?

    “When he was answering my question, I found it so applicable to my life, so real to me, especially the way I allowed some negative things that were being said last year — not in a racial sense, but about me as a player and my family — to get to me,” Noah said. “I could’ve listened to him speak for another hour and asked him so many more questions.”

    When the session ended, when the others filed out for lunch, Joakim Noah headed straight for the man he called “the greatest winner of all time,” and squeezed in a few.

  12. #37
    Rebound King Kstat's Avatar
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    Default Re: McNabb: "Peyton (and other white QBs) doesn't get criticized as much as I do."

    John Elway remains the most athletically gifted QB in the history of football. I don't care what anybody else says.

    He had all the speed on earth but didn't have to use it because he also had a golden arm. most of Elway's runs were on 4th down when all other options were closed.

    It wasn't about being the team everyone loved, it was about beating the teams everyone else loved.

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  13. #38

    Default Re: McNabb: "Peyton (and other white QBs) doesn't get criticized as much as I do."

    Quote Originally Posted by Kstat View Post
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    John Elway remains the most athletically gifted QB in the history of football. I don't care what anybody else says.

    He had all the speed on earth but didn't have to use it because he also had a golden arm. most of Elway's runs were on 4th down when all other options were closed.
    Too bad he was so dumb.

  14. #39
    Member Evan_The_Dude's Avatar
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    Default Re: McNabb: "Peyton (and other white QBs) doesn't get criticized as much as I do."

    Peyton Manning doesn't get criticized because he doesn't open his damn mouth and make excuses. He goes out and busts his *** and just happened to win a Superbowl ring last season in the process of it all. I'm black, and I think McNabb needs to STFU.

  15. #40
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    Default Re: McNabb: "Peyton (and other white QBs) doesn't get criticized as much as I do."

    Quote Originally Posted by BlueNGold View Post
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    Uh...John Elway was mobile?
    Are you serious? LOL!

  16. #41

    Default Re: McNabb: "Peyton (and other white QBs) doesn't get criticized as much as I do."

    McNabb addresses the interview on his blog:

    http://yardbarker.com/author/column/11959

    There has been a lot of talk about the interview I did on HBO's Real Sports. I have no apologies. I was asked a variety of questions and I answered them. The fact that the producers and publicists at HBO decided to focus on those answers that related to race shows that it remains a hot topic in society today.

    Let me address some feedback...

    First, the interview took place in August before the season started so for those who think I "played the race card" because we are 0-2 are dead wrong.

    I did not say that Peyton Manning, Tom Brady and Carson Palmer are not criticized when they don't play well. They have been criticized when they throw interceptions, when the throw incompletions, and when their teams don't win. They are criticized and so is every other quarterback for that matter. And that type of criticism may, in fact, be warranted. But that's not the type of criticism that we discussed.

    Black quarterbacks have to deal with different things than white quarterbacks. If you don't think that's true than you are naïve. Peyton, Tom
    and Carson to name a few, have never been asked what it's like to be a white quarterback. They probably have not been told that they should have scrambled more. I bet Fran Tarkenton, Steve Young, Jake Plummer, and Doug Flutie have never been told by a member of any racial consciousness organization that they don't play the quarterback position white enough.

    I would love to live in a world where race is not an issue. But it is. I did not ask HBO to interview me but I did consent. I did not bring up the topic of race but I didn't back down from it either. This interview was supposed to be about how my career has been surrounded by controversy and how my upbringing has shaped the way I have dealt with it. Unfortunately, the interview itself has created yet another controversy.

    All I did was answer the questions that were asked of me honestly and truthfully. I had no agenda. The people of Philadelphia have criticized my
    coach for not answering questions. Now I'm criticized for answering questions. I understand if people have a different opinion or view point than I do, I really do. I think if there is one thing I understand better than most people - it's okay to be different.
    Last edited by Aw Heck; 09-21-2007 at 11:21 AM.
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  17. #42
    Get well PG! QuickRelease's Avatar
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    Default Re: McNabb: "Peyton (and other white QBs) doesn't get criticized as much as I do."

    How many ridiculous "Peyton can't win the big game" jabs did we hear? Criticism follows everybody. I don't know how much of it you can attribute to race. Fans are pretty amiable when the team is winning.

  18. #43
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    Default Re: McNabb: "Peyton (and other white QBs) doesn't get criticized as much as I do."

    It's not that you're black Donovan...it's that you play in Philly. Those fans are brutal. And if you remember..they booed Santa Clause, and he's white!

  19. #44
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    Default Re: McNabb: "Peyton (and other white QBs) doesn't get criticized as much as I do."

    Quote Originally Posted by johnnybegood View Post
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    It's not that you're black Donovan...it's that you play in Philly. Those fans are brutal. And if you remember..they booed Santa Clause, and he's white!
    Exactly.
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  20. #45

    Default Re: McNabb: "Peyton (and other white QBs) doesn't get criticized as much as I do."

    I agree with his blog. But I still think it has to do with the black community rather than society at large.

    McNabb does it too. When TO said they would be better with Favre, McNabb said something about it being a black on black crime. It would be OK to mention black quarterbacks ahead of him but not white. Those are the comments which led to the silly observation that he doesn't play black enough.
    "They could turn out to be only innocent mathematicians, I suppose," muttered Woevre's section officer, de Decker.

    "'Only.'" Woevre was amused. "Someday you'll explain to me how that's possible. Seeing that, on the face of it, all mathematics leads, doesn't it, sooner or later, to some kind of human suffering."

  21. #46
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    Default Re: McNabb: "Peyton (and other white QBs) doesn't get criticized as much as I do."

    Quote Originally Posted by Shade View Post
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    Tainted Chunky soup?
    so true.

  22. #47
    The Last Great Pacer BlueNGold's Avatar
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    Default Re: McNabb: "Peyton (and other white QBs) doesn't get criticized as much as I do."

    Quote Originally Posted by Big Smooth View Post
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    Are you serious? LOL!
    Ok, I must never have watched him enough. I may have him confused with Marino. My recollection was seeing him throw darts, not run the ball. I will concede y'all obviously know him better than I do.

  23. #48
    NaptownSeth is all feel Naptown_Seth's Avatar
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    Default Re: McNabb: "Peyton (and other white QBs) doesn't get criticized as much as I do."

    McNabb is right about a few things, even if he was wrong about the criticism aspect (of the quality of his play/results). He does get the "you're special, you're a black QB" angle on interviews/discussions which at this point is just retarded. And the black civil rights community has derailed badly in it's quest for racial equality as it has adopted the exact same "you are limited by your skin color" views as white racists had/have, except they've chosen other definitions for "black appropriate" behavior.

    Scrambling as a QB is a black thing...but someone forgot to tell them that so is standing in the pocket, being a nerd, joining a country club and adopting a snobbish east coast accent. If you are black and choose to do it then by definition it just became a "black thing". More power to the people eliminating those artificial boundries, including McNabb.

  24. #49
    Go Colts! Shade's Avatar
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    Default Re: McNabb: "Peyton (and other white QBs) doesn't get criticized as much as I do."

    The Eagles are up 35-7 on the Lions...

    ...with 40 minutes still left to play.

  25. #50
    Member naptownmenace's Avatar
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    Default Re: McNabb: "Peyton (and other white QBs) doesn't get criticized as much as I do."

    Quote Originally Posted by Kstat View Post
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    John Elway remains the most athletically gifted QB in the history of football. I don't care what anybody else says.

    He had all the speed on earth but didn't have to use it because he also had a golden arm. most of Elway's runs were on 4th down when all other options were closed.
    You might not care but Elway was far from the "most athletically gifted QB in the history of football." He was big, strong, durable, and an assasin but he was never really quick. He was smart and would run on occasion but he was no more athletic than Steve Young, Joe Montana, or even Randall Cunningham.
    Quote Originally Posted by vnzla81
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    Larry is not coming back, he didn't have a meeting with Orlando for not reason, yeah he is coming back to the NBA but not to the Pacers, the notion that he is a taking a year off and then come back is absurd.
    Quote Originally Posted by Trader Joe View Post
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