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Thread: Hey, rcarey, check it...

  1. #1
    Harmonica
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    Default Hey, rcarey, check it...

    I was researching how I might buy the photographic print of my avatar and noticed that the guy who took the picture of Coltrane in your avatar is the same guy who took the picture of Johnny Cash in mine:

    http://www.jimmarshallvault.com/Cata...All&GoToPage=1

  2. #2
    sweabs
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    Default Re: Hey, rcarey, check it...

    Thanks for the link - the guy has some great photographs.

    The prices are obviously steep, but what exactly do you get for your money? I love the colour shot of Coltrane, along with the picture of Monk.

    P.S. - the picture of Miles in the boxing ring is a little provocative...and I have enough Miles posters in my room.

  3. #3
    Harmonica
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    Default Re: Hey, rcarey, check it...

    Quote Originally Posted by rcarey
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    Thanks for the link - the guy has some great photographs.

    The prices are obviously steep, but what exactly do you get for your money? I love the colour shot of Coltrane, along with the picture of Monk.

    P.S. - the picture of Miles in the boxing ring is a little provocative...and I have enough Miles posters in my room.
    I think you get a photographic print - probably from the original negative. The price varies on the size.

    And yeah, I love the color shots of Monk and Miles. Coincidently, I happen to be listening to Kind of Blue as I write this. Greatest recording of the 20th century? If not, it's certainly close.

  4. #4
    sweabs
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    Default Re: Hey, rcarey, check it...

    Quote Originally Posted by Harmonica
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    I think you get a photographic print - probably from the original negative. The price varies on the size.

    And yeah, I love the color shots of Monk and Miles. Coincidently, I happen to be listening to Kind of Blue as I write this. Greatest recording of the 20th century? If not, it's certainly close.
    Thanks for that link - I'm going to look into getting either one of those colour shots.

    As for Kind of Blue, without doubt, it is one of the most important/influential albums of the 20th century. I never get bored of listening to that album; I always seem to hear something new each time I listen.

    I can't even tell you how many times I've put on the record, cranked it, pulled out the trombone, and jammed to So What with Miles, Cannonball, Coltrane, Bill Evans and the boys.

    Seriously, that is a STACKED combo.

  5. #5
    Harmonica
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    Default Re: Hey, rcarey, check it...

    Quote Originally Posted by rcarey
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    As for Kind of Blue, without doubt, it is one of the most important/influential albums of the 20th century. I never get bored of listening to that album; I always seem to hear something new each time I listen.

    I can't even tell you how many times I've put on the record, cranked it, pulled out the trombone, and jammed to So What with Miles, Cannonball, Coltrane, Bill Evans and the boys.
    I love that first cymbal crash in So What. Timeless.

  6. #6
    sweabs
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    Default Re: Hey, rcarey, check it...

    Quote Originally Posted by Harmonica
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    I love that first cymbal crash in So What. Timeless.
    Yep.

    This is written on the back of my reissued version:

    "If you're going to heaven, might as well go first-class all the way".

  7. #7
    Harmonica
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    Default Re: Hey, rcarey, check it...

    Quote Originally Posted by rcarey
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    Yep.

    This is written on the back of my reissued version:

    "If you're going to heaven, might as well go first-class all the way".
    You'll love this:

    Quincy Jones once said, "I play Kind of Blue every day—it's my orange juice."

  8. #8
    sweabs
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    Default Re: Hey, rcarey, check it...

    Quote Originally Posted by Harmonica
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    You'll love this:

    Quincy Jones once said, "I play Kind of Blue every day—it's my orange juice."
    That's a great quote! I have never heard it before, but makes absolute sense.

    My jazz teacher in highschool always used to encourage us to listen, listen, listen. It's the only way you can improve your compositions and improvisational skills. I have bought so many JJ Johnson albums over the years that I can literally whistle every single damn note for every solo on numerous albums.

    Once you have that many licks stuck in your head, they're just unconsciously released from your instrument during improv.

    I love that quote; I personally have an album that has become my "orange juice" as well.

  9. #9
    Harmonica
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    Default Re: Hey, rcarey, check it...

    Quote Originally Posted by rcarey
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    I love that quote; I personally have an album that has become my "orange juice" as well.
    And what album might that be?

  10. #10
    sweabs
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    Default Re: Hey, rcarey, check it...

    Quote Originally Posted by Harmonica
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    And what album might that be?
    JJ Inc. - JJ Johnson Sextet

    JJ Johnson was the first jazz artist I caught on to, and this album just stood out among the others that I've heard. There are many things about it that make it number 1 on my list: the tone, the chemistry, and the articulation/syncopation to name a few. I'm a little biased however, being a trombonist, and JJ being the most influential musician for myself.

    You must have a favourite jazz album, or album in whatever genre that you listen to religiously? Would Kind of Blue be your favourite in the jazz category?

  11. #11
    Harmonica
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    Default Re: Hey, rcarey, check it...

    Quote Originally Posted by rcarey
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    JJ Inc. - JJ Johnson Sextet

    JJ Johnson was the first jazz artist I caught on to, and this album just stood out among the others that I've heard. There are many things about it that make it number 1 on my list: the tone, the chemistry, and the articulation/syncopation to name a few. I'm a little biased however, being a trombonist, and JJ being the most influential musician for myself.

    You must have a favourite jazz album, or album in whatever genre that you listen to religiously? Would Kind of Blue be your favourite in the jazz category?
    Kind of Blue would be one of several in jazz, although it was the album that began my exploration into it. In 1996 I was in a Tower Records and heard this fantastic music playing. I went up to the clerk and asked him what it was and he told me it was Kind of Blue. Well, that was it for me. I own probably over a 100 jazz recordings now. So yeah, it was a seminal album for me. I probably listen to it about once a month and have given it as a gift to a lot of friends. It's just so evocative. I'll have to check out J.J. Inc.

  12. #12
    sweabs
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    Default Re: Hey, rcarey, check it...

    Quote Originally Posted by Harmonica
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    Kind of Blue would be one of several in jazz, although it was the album that began my exploration into it. In 1996 I was in a Tower Records and heard this fantastic music playing. I went up to the clerk and asked him what it was and he told me it was Kind of Blue. Well, that was it for me. I own probably over a 100 jazz recordings now. So yeah, it was a seminal album for me. I probably listen to it about once a month and have given it as a gift to a lot of friends. It's just so evocative. I'll have to check out J.J. Inc.
    Please do. Have you listened to any JJ Johnson before?

  13. #13
    Harmonica
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    Default Re: Hey, rcarey, check it...

    Quote Originally Posted by btowncolt
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    Oh yeah?!??

    I play the saxamaphone!
    I knew it wouldn't be long before someone came along and peed in the pool.

  14. #14
    Harmonica
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    Default Re: Hey, rcarey, check it...

    Quote Originally Posted by rcarey
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    Please do. Have you listened to any JJ Johnson before?
    I haven't. But I went and checked out J.J. Inc. on iTunes. Very difficult to get a thirty-second reading on a jazz song, but it sounded very reminiscent of early-60s Blue Note recordings. Not that that's a bad thing, in fact it's nice to hear the reverence to that great era in jazz, but would it really add anything to my collection?

  15. #15
    sweabs
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    Default Re: Hey, rcarey, check it...

    Quote Originally Posted by Harmonica
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    I haven't. But I went and checked out J.J. Inc. on iTunes. Very difficult to get a thirty-second reading on a jazz song, but it sounded very reminiscent of early-60s Blue Note recordings. Not that that's a bad thing, in fact it's nice to hear the reverence to that great era in jazz, but would it really add anything to my collection?
    Definitely a blue note recording of sorts...but the true value of the album comes from JJ himself on the trombone, and the fact that almost all of the songs are compositions by JJ himself.

    Bebop on the trombone was thought to be impossible by a lot of musicians at the time, but JJ was one of the first to introduce it as a solo instrument along with some other notables (Frank Rosolino, et al). In JJ Inc. the trombone has a dominant role throughout the album, and JJ displays all of its capabilities. At times you will think he is playing on a valve trombone because of his articulation and ability to run up and down pentatonic scales as if he were Coltrane. On the other hand, in some songs, you would swear that the sound is digitally edited because his tone is just that pure...it's unbelievable.

    This album is not going to add any different genre/style of jazz to your collection, as you've already observed - it's an early 60s blue-note recording (probably my favourite decade for jazz...). However, what this album will give you is a new appreciation for the trombone as a solo instrument. Not only do you get to hear the amazing talents of JJ through his horn, but also through his compositions (if you're a Horace Silver fan, you will definitely like some of the songs...JJ was heavily influenced by Horace). I'm going to assume that you don't have any prior JJ recordings in your house, and here's the thing: I'm willing to bet you have some Charlie Parker for example. I will say this: JJ Johnson is to the trombone, what Charlie Parker is to the sax. He is that important.

    I should have mentioned this earlier - but I'd be glad to hook you up with the songs which I've recorded on my computer. Just let me know how you'd want to send/receive.

  16. #16
    Harmonica
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    Default Re: Hey, rcarey, check it...

    I have a couple of Horace Silver recordings, but I can't really say I'm a fan. Same goes for Parker. I know that's blasphemes, but it all starts with Miles (time period-wise) for me. Like you, I just don't think it gets better than the late-50s/early-to-mid 60s for jazz. I really like how Kind of Blue took jazz into a more modal realm, although I love Louis Armstrong's Hot Fives & Sevens. That has to be in my top 10 jazz recordings.

    Yeah, that'd be great if you could send me J.J. Inc.. I'll PM you with my mailing info. Thanks.

  17. #17
    flexible and robust SoupIsGood's Avatar
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    Default Re: Hey, rcarey, check it...

    Wow, whenever Rcarey posts Harmonica isn't far behind.

    Is this what they call mangy mutt love
    You, Never? Did the Kenosha Kid?

  18. #18
    sweabs
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    Default Re: Hey, rcarey, check it...

    Quote Originally Posted by Harmonica
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    I have a couple of Horace Silver recordings, but I can't really say I'm a fan. Same goes for Parker. I know that's blasphemes, but it all starts with Miles (time period-wise) for me. Like you, I just don't think it gets better than the late-50s/early-to-mid 60s for jazz. I really like how Kind of Blue took jazz into a more modal realm, although I love Louis Armstrong's Hot Fives & Sevens. That has to be in my top 10 jazz recordings.

    Yeah, that'd be great if you could send me J.J. Inc.. I'll PM you with my mailing info. Thanks.
    No problem - I think everyone should listen to JJ at least once. Like I said before, he's just that important.

  19. #19

    Default Re: Hey, rcarey, check it...

    I'm currently looking for a good pic of Albert Ayler to use. The Sonny Rollins w/ the mohawk is kind of creeping me out these days although you don't see all that many pics of him with the 'hawk on display.

    I've been somewhat tempted to use the one of his Ayler's brother Donald from the inside the Love Cry booklet where (in the words of Byron Coley) "...it must be noted that the booklet features a most incredible photo of Donald Ayler, holding his trumpet and looking at it as though an alien had just burst through the studio wall and placed an extraterrestrial turd in his hands. It'd make a great t-shirt."

    Yes, I did have to go find the old copy of Forced Exposure where Coley reviews that record and yes, it would make a great t-shirt. Feh.

  20. #20

    Default Re: Hey, rcarey, check it...

    It's probably the safe choice critically but the two "Eminent JJ Johnson" volumes (particularly Vol.2) on Blue Note would be my advice on where it would be a good place to start for someone new to his music.

    Hey, rcarey, do you listen to any Roswell Rudd or any of the combos he's known for playing with at all (Lacy, Shepp, etc.)?

  21. #21
    sweabs
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    Default Re: Hey, rcarey, check it...

    Quote Originally Posted by kerosene
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    It's probably the safe choice critically but the two "Eminent JJ Johnson" volumes (particularly Vol.2) on Blue Note would be my advice on where it would be a good place to start for someone new to his music.

    Hey, rcarey, do you listen to any Roswell Rudd or any of the combos he's known for playing with at all (Lacy, Shepp, etc.)?
    I have both the Eminent volumes, and they definitely have a "real" sound to them. You can even hear the boys playing out of tune at times. Don't get me wrong, those are some great albums, but I'm just more of a fan of his later stuff (except not too late...like Vivian).

    I've never heard any Roswell Rudd...could you give me some more info.?

    By the way - I love Sonny Rollins.

  22. #22

    Default Re: Hey, rcarey, check it...

    Quote Originally Posted by rcarey
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    I've never heard any Roswell Rudd...could you give me some more info.?

    By the way - I love Sonny Rollins.
    Rudd is a fantastic trombone player, since you play (?) I figured I'd ask. He hasn't had all that many releases under his leadership (relative to most jazzmen anyway) but his career is deeply intertwined with a few particular people that he's played with over and over again: Steve Lacy (soprano - he and Lacy were seemingly inseperable for a long time), Archie Shepp (tenor) and Cecil Taylor (piano) are the primary ones. His style may not be your cup of tea as he's not a bop or hard bop player but he's played on some tremendous records and if you're interested in the 'New Thing' era, late period Coltrane, 60's Ornette, etc. at all you should definitely check him out.

    Here's some links to a few cds that he plays on that I think are great (the shepp cd is tremendous, absolutely need to hear stuff). If you're curious you should check out the Amazon user reviews and see he sounds interesting


    Roswell Rudd "Flexible Flyer"

    Archie Shepp "Four For 'Trane"

    Steve Lacy "School Days"

    Cecil Taylor Unit / Roswell Rudd Sextet "Mixed"

    Cecil Taylor "Jumpin' Punkins"

  23. #23
    sweabs
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    Default Re: Hey, rcarey, check it...

    Kerosene,

    I just finished listening to some of the 1:00 minute clips from each album. Thanks for the links.

    I must say that I really enjoyed what I heard from the Jumpin' Punkins album, along with the Four For 'Trane. I'm going to check out my store to see if they can get me those, or just end up getting them off the internet. I'm always looking to add to my collection, especially with trombone stuff.

    Most of my collection centres around stuff from the 50s and 60s, but I've recently decided to give "free jazz" another shot - specifically Ornette Coleman. I don't know if I'll ever be able to understand his stuff, but I've been looking for new types of jazz that fit under this, as you label it, "new thing" era. I think some of this Roswell Rudd will be perfect; not to mention the heavy trombone influence will really appeal to me.

    Thanks for the recommendations - do you have any other trombone artists or stuff worth looking into? Specifically from this era?

  24. #24
    Harmonica
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    Default Re: Hey, rcarey, check it...

    Quote Originally Posted by rcarey
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    Most of my collection centres around stuff from the 50s and 60s, but I've recently decided to give "free jazz" another shot - specifically Ornette Coleman. I don't know if I'll ever be able to understand his stuff, but I've been looking for new types of jazz that fit under this, as you label it, "new thing" era. I think some of this Roswell Rudd will be perfect; not to mention the heavy trombone influence will really appeal to me.
    Yeah, free jazz is a little hard on my ears as well. As a music composer friend of mine said, "You have to work up to it, but it makes perfect sense." I had an interesting thing happen recently. I bought Bîtches Brew several years ago and just couldn't get into it. Well, a few weeks ago I put it on and wow! it just blew me away. They were breathing fire in those sessions. I kinda think that's what my friend was talking about. My ears weren't ready for it when I first heard it. Oh, have you listened to Grant Green's Idle Moments? That's one of those early-60s Blue Note recordings that incorporates a traditionally non-jazz instrument (Bobby Hutcherson on the vibraphone) and makes it somehow work to quirky effect.

  25. #25
    Member pollardfreek's Avatar
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    Default Re: Hey, rcarey, check it...

    Ever since I started getting really serious about my guitar playing and theory, I've started listening to jazz and blues so I could get schooled in the roots of more modern music. I've started listening to Louis Jordan and I've got to say I love his stuff. Since you guys seem to be experts on the subject I was just wondering if you had any suggestions for somebody like me who's just getting into the genre.

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