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Thread: Read this and feel better....(WARNING: Brawl Article)

  1. #26
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    Default Re: Read this and feel better....(WARNING: Brawl Article)

    Save the English lesson. It seems quite petty and semantical considering this is a basketball forum and not English 101. (sighs)

  2. #27
    flexible and robust SoupIsGood's Avatar
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    Default Re: Read this and feel better....(WARNING: Brawl Article)

    Quote Originally Posted by DisplacedKnick
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    Seems nobody here reads any more. I suggested that someone else learn the difference between a verb and a noun but here's a hint:

    a beating = noun
    beating on (which the article used) = verb

    The two are not identical. Now Artest didn't start beating on anyone, nor did he deliver a beating but it would still be nice if people understood the difference between the two and didn't misrepresent the article - while saying that the article misrepresented what happened.


    They aren't misrepresenting anything, but rather, I think you are being petty.

    Let's break down the two phrases -

    Phrase 1 - Deliver a beating

    Deliver - Transitive verb in this case

    a beating - noun; direct object (I don't believe the 'a' is actually lumped with the DO, but it doesn't matter)

    Phrase 2 - Beating a man (the actual phrase used by the article)

    beating - progressive form of beat, which is also a transitive verb in this case

    a man - noun; direct object (I don't believe the 'a' is actually lumped with the DO, but it doesn't matter---noticing a pattern here?)

    The purpose of direct objects is to alter/complete the meaning of the original verb, therefore, both phrases function as predicates.

    You can't isolate a direct object from a verb, and a verb from a direct object like you just did. You must consider the phrases in their entirety, and when you do, they are both essentially verbs! They both accomplish the same thing. Either way, this poor lad gets hit by Artest repeatedly. Well, this article reports this poor lad to have been hit by Artest repeatedly, anyhow.
    You, Never? Did the Kenosha Kid?

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