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Thread: My Take on the NBA Age Limit Rule

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    CA Pacer Fan A-Train's Avatar
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    Default My Take on the NBA Age Limit Rule

    While I can understand why this new rule may seem unfair (there are many good arguments against having an age limit), this comment by Oden from the recent Indy Star article is precisely the reason why the NBA wants the age limit rule:

    "It's said and done, so there's nothing you can do about it now," Greg Oden said. "I'm not sad, but I feel bad for whenever the next LeBron comes along and he has to go to college and something happens, either he gets injured or doesn't live up to expectations."

    "Or doesn't live up to expectations"

    Well, if a player can't "live up to expectations" at the college level, then he never deserved to be paid the millions he would have gotten in the NBA based solely on his "potential". Just because you dominated at the high school level, that doesn't necessarily translate to how you're going to play in the NBA. I see nothing wrong with the NBA owners wanting the players they're about to pay millions to wanting to have a better idea as to what they're getting for their money.

    Or, even if a player eventually does live up to expectations, what if he takes four years to do so? Like, say, Jermaine O'Neal did? Is it fair to the Portland Trailblazers that they paid O'Neal millions of dollars to sit on their bench for four years and learn the NBA game, only to see him leave and prosper with another team?

    Sure, O'Neal benefited from the whole deal because he got his money, but does it make good business sense to have a system in place that rewards unproven talent at the expense of 1) the owners who are forced to gamble on the unproven talent and 2) veteran players who could have occupied that seat on the bench, but were pushed aside in favor of "potential"?

    Again, I could easily argue the unconstitutionality of an age limit rule, but if you look at this from the standpoint of the owners and the league, an age limit rule is a good thing.

    The league didn't suffer back in it's heyday in the 80's because Larry Bird didn't come in to the league at 18. The league didn't suffer because Charles Barkley didn't come into the league right out of high school. Hakeem Olajuwan's time spent at the University of Houston didn't seem to inhibit his Hall of Fame career or his ability to win two NBA Champions. Did the league struggle because Michael Jordan spent three years at the University of North Carolina? Did Michael? Reggie Miller spent four years at UCLA. Would he have been better off, both as a person and a player, had he languished for four years on the Pacer bench trying to learn the NBA game? I seriously doubt it.

    One of the biggest complaints about the NBA right now is the fact that the players aren't fundamentally sound. Well, a big reason for that is that many of the players in the league have not had the benefit of being prepared before entering the league. In what other profession do we see kids promoted to CEO based on their potential? No, you spend your time learning your profession and are then promoted based on ability, not potential.

    If these kids are truly ready for the NBA, one year in college will not change that. And if they're not, perhaps one year in college will expose that, and owners will be better off for it.

  2. #2
    Grumpy Old Man (PD host) able's Avatar
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    Default Re: My Take on the NBA Age Limit Rule

    Interesting view you have there, but so far off base and more importantly so lobsided in the favour of the "owners" that you seem to overlook a few things here:

    1. Owners are NOT forced to sign high school talent, they do so totally voluntair.
    2. The second a GM select with his first round draftpick a "HS-Talent" he knows what he has to pay and what he is buying, that is what the scouting system is all about.
    3. A player who is not fundamentally strong enough to make the NBA wont make it in college either, to pick a player that is not fundamentally strong is again a perogative of the GM, the higher the risk etc.
    4. Would LeBron have been better when he went to college for 1 year?
    5. Is it right for colleges to function as "training-ground" for NBA teams?
    6. Wouldn't the place (and scholarship) given to a player with NBA potential that teams are willing to sign to a NBA contract, and who is most likely to leave college now after his 1st year, not better been given to someone who intents to finish college?
    7. Is the risk of getting injured really a risk that a talented player with NBA potential, who under the "old" rules could have gotten a lucrative multi-million dollar deal to be left squarely on the player's shoulders?

    The owners are making money of their team, at least that is their intention, if not then they can afford a very expensive hobby and we still do not have to feel sorry for them, in both cases limiting their "risks" from above is ridiculously lobsided as there is no "reduced" risk possible for the HS talent that is now locked out.

    Let's keep Oden as an example, since everyone is convinced he's the Next LeBron, let's say he goes to college for the year, as he is now "supposed" to, we can at this moment in time say that Oden would be a #1 pick, at least most of us agree on that.
    His guaranteed salary for the first 3 years would be (based on 04-05 season figures) $3,483,100 $3,744,300 $4,005,600 totalling roughly 12 million dollar.
    This money is guaranteed, providing he's the 1st draft pick, would he be the last in the 1st round he would get little over 2 million dollars guaranteed over the 1st 3 years.
    Now, if he does not pan out, his 4th year option will not be picked up, however, if he does, it will, meaning in his 4th year he will still be "cheap".

    In either case we are looking at more money then he will make in a large number of years working with his college degree.

    Now, he gets a knee injury in his (only) college year.

    IF it is deemed likely he will be playing again sometime, he might "just" drop to the last pick of the first round ( for a loss of 10 million dollar) or the second round, for a loss of 12 million dollar.
    He will however still be able to make the money in the future, be it that he will have to wait longer and grow slower, so the total loss of income will be around 20 million dollar.

    This is money saved by the "owner" usually someone who is listed in the Forbes hot 100.

    If he can not go to the NBA because of this injury, his total loss of income can be estimated around 100 million dollar.

    So, in effect to save the "owner" a possible loss (risk) of a failed #1 pick, at 12 million dollar, you require a kid to risk his 100 million dollar, taking into account that the owner has the millions and the kid has nothing.

    Now you come back and tell me where that is "reasonable" or "fair", as I can not see that anywhere in this ridiculous construction of nonsense that the "age" limit is.

    To make it even more interesting the NBDL will be expanded, players can play there from age 18, so we tip the scales even more in the favourable balance of the owners.

    Example: kid is 18, would be lottery pick, average estimated income over the first 3 years 8 million dollar.
    He does not have the academic grades to go to college, and lets say he is not interested either.
    He is now offered a NBDL contract, by the owner of an NBA team, he will make 100 thousand the first 2 years or so, in anyway that is more money then he would otherwise be able to make, so choices are limited, please do not bring up the argument that prices on salary in the NBDL will rise drastically, owner share the teams, so they will most certainly not start the bidding wars they had in the NBA. He has a clause in his contract that (after the first year) he can be "called-up" to the NBA, his salary will then raise to the league's minimum, but in exchange for the the owner gets an option year (or two).

    If he doesn't pan out, the owner only loses a few hundred thousand dollar, the kid only gets that money and if he DOES pan out, in 4 years time, he will have made 1 million instead 8 million.

    Doing anything else in the meanwhile is dangerous, he is not insured for the income, as he would be in the NBDL or the NBA, so playing for a college or "grade" is certainly if your parents aren't "well off" to begin with a very big risk.

    (that btw is where the racial part comes in, considering most kids are of a poorer background)

    So in order to "feast" upon the college system we demand an 18 year old to risk an income he can only dream of in "normal" circumstances, but do not hand him any insurance in the meanwhile.

    Did you ever wonder why a country like the Netherlands is continuously int he top 5 of the world's strongest football nations ? among Brazil, Argentine, Germany ?
    15 million people surely produce less talent then 100 million Brits, or 400 million Americans.
    It has to do with the structure of professional football in that country, kids are scouted at very young ages, and go to special institutes to be honed, and get private tuition paid for by the club that scouted the kid and pays for the institute.
    If they don't pan out, they have a very good education, if they do the world is their home and they make money beyond their dreams.
    But the teams bear the cost of those institutes, they bear the cost of living, they pay a modest salary when the kids turn 15 or 16 and start playing for representative age group teams, and so on and so on.
    The kids are insured (income-loss) while in training, or while playing.

    A kid that is deemed a talent but doesn't pan out, it is a business risk, a kid that has the talent and likely will pan out but gets injured playing for a scholarship because he was not allowed to turn pro and will never get his payday is what?
    So Long And Thanks For All The Fish.

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    Default Re: My Take on the NBA Age Limit Rule

    Quote Originally Posted by A-Train
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    Or, even if a player eventually does live up to expectations, what if he takes four years to do so? Like, say, Jermaine O'Neal did? Is it fair to the Portland Trailblazers that they paid O'Neal millions of dollars to sit on their bench for four years and learn the NBA game, only to see him leave and prosper with another team?

    Is it JO's fault that Portland never gave him the chance to prosper? He's not the coach, all he can do is play. I highly doubt that the reason was he wasn't ready to play. Jermaine even said in the March Issue of ESPN the magazine that Scottie Pippen commented once that even one of our best players doesn't get in the game, and that by his third year he was outplaying most guys in practice.
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    CA Pacer Fan A-Train's Avatar
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    Default Re: My Take on the NBA Age Limit Rule

    How much money has Jonathan Bender made in his career? How much of that was earned?

    Was it his "right" to have made that money just because he was a very good high school basketball player? Had he gone to college and had a similiar string of injuries and, subsequently, lost out on being a high draft pick, would he have "lost" that money, or did he simply never deserve it in the first place?

    Great points, able. Like I said, I could argue the other side just as well, but have chosen to take the side of the age limit. And it comes down to Bender's example for me... was it his "right" to earn that money based on potential? I just don't see how someone has "lost" salary when they never deserved it in the first place.

  5. #5

    Default Re: My Take on the NBA Age Limit Rule

    Quote Originally Posted by A-Train
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    I just don't see how someone has "lost" salary when they never deserved it in the first place.

    Yeah, I know what you mean, this quote

    "I'm not sad, but I feel bad for whenever the next LeBron comes along and he has to go to college and something happens, either he gets injured or doesn't live up to expectations."
    has gotten under my skin since I heard it, if you can't live up to expectations in College, how are you expected to in the NBA?
    Life without water is tough, life without air is hard,life with one leg only is wobbly, Life without Reggie Miller, is impossible.

    Do Not Trade Austin

    Quote Originally Posted by Conrad Brunner
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    Veteran Austin Croshere, the longest-tenured Pacers player on the roster, has proven reliable when called upon, invariably ready to step in regardless of the circumstance.

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    Grumpy Old Man (PD host) able's Avatar
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    Default Re: My Take on the NBA Age Limit Rule

    Bender was selected on "potential".
    He was a deliberate risk taken by a GM who even took that risk further by extending the contract of that player.
    Bender is still only 24 years old, and he can still (however unlikely) pan out.
    No matter what argument you make by saying what you did, you just enforced mine, the "owner" would have saved a hell of a lot of money on a gamble he made, but since gambling is not illegal in most states, certainly not if it is a private bet (between the owner and the player panning out) the owner took a risk, he was not forced to take that risk, nobody held a gun against his head, and in this particular case Donnie even traded a known entity in order to be able to take this gamble.

    Had he had the same injury string in college the only one "saving" anything would have been the team willing to take the risk in the first place, why would he have to loose this income because someone else needs to be protected from gambling?

    His potential paid him his future, one day he might or might not fullfill that potential, but the risk was taken after carfeful consideration, not a forced matter.

    Henceforth he is entitled to that money and if other owners want to gamble that way, then who is the NBA to stop them from doing that?
    So Long And Thanks For All The Fish.

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  7. #7

    Default Re: My Take on the NBA Age Limit Rule

    There's so many facets to this argument that it gets overwhelming.

    But it always boils down to one thing to me. If a company wants to take a risk on an 18-year old, there's no reason that anyone should be able to stop said company.

    Employer, employee.

    Let the owners run their business the way each of them invidually wants to.

    I've even got another argument, which I find to be truly laughable:

    These 18-year-olds go out and spend a lot of money on junk sometimes. Mercedes, whatever. That's stimulating the economy, baby.

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    Grumpy Old Man (PD host) able's Avatar
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    Default Re: My Take on the NBA Age Limit Rule

    Quote Originally Posted by 8.9_seconds
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    Yeah, I know what you mean, this quote

    has gotten under my skin since I heard it, if you can't live up to expectations in College, how are you expected to in the NBA?
    Ever heard of the stock market ?

    People used to buy shares for the dividend paid each year, a company had a set value, usually about 7 times the annual turnover.
    Since there was a "risk" involved, divident payouts were tax free and usually a little netter then normal bank interest.

    Over time the market changed, people bought stock to speculate on the value of a company or a commodidity over time, in other words, buy pigskins now, in a good year make 200%.
    Or if you would have bought M$ in the startup or Yahoo for that matter, or Netscape on float, you name 'm you would have made millions upon millions.
    The collapse proved that it was really a risk, people who were satisfied with their bank interest or their dividend on bonds did not loose any money when the Nasdaq came a tumbling down.
    Those who took the risk of a high payback lost a lot of money, were the companies they invested in "entitled" to that money? were they "worth" the investment?
    Obviously someone thought they were, hence they paid and hence someone now is very rich due to that fact.
    Several "owners" who "floated" their company during the boom became Billionaires while their company now is worth pennies, if still traded.

    Nobody says that it is unfair people lost their money in the stock market, they knew the risk they were taking, wel the same goes for owners of NBA teams, by signing a HS kid you know you take a risk, it either pays off (LeBron, Wade) or it doesn't (Brown, Bender).

    That however does not mean that the "potential" be it a company or a human being is not worth the money someone else is willing to gamble on them.

    Are you prohibited of buying shares in "young" companies?
    So Long And Thanks For All The Fish.

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    Member Moses's Avatar
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    Default Re: My Take on the NBA Age Limit Rule

    I wrote a paper on this a while back and I used alot of the points able did.

    Like Able and Kraft said, It's the owners risk. He doesn't have to draft that high school player with potential..He can go with said player from college if he wants to...Which is why an age limit is bogus to begin with. It shouldn't be up to Stern and company to decide who these owners are drafting.

  10. #10

    Default Re: My Take on the NBA Age Limit Rule

    I think that the NBA is sick of seeing these high schoolers come in and not contribute anything right away. Yes there will always be some busts in any sports draft but this rule should help prevent them somewhat.

    Another thing that alot of people use as an arguement say Lebron, KG, Kobe, TMac, JO, and so on are making impacts in the NBA but my question is how did they do in there first year? Lebron is the only one who played well. Amare Stoudamire made a nice contribution to the Suns but what alot of people don't know is he was 20 early into his NBA career. [His Birthday = 11/16/82.]

    I don't think that there is a single person who can honestly say that one year to develope wouldn't have helped teams project players such as Jonathan Bender, Kwame Brown, Tyson Chandler, Eddy Curry, Desagana Diop and so on.

    Also don't forget that there is more to the NBA than just on the court. There is off the court where you have to be extremely mature to handle it all. That one year in between HS and the NBA should help these players mature off the court too.

    In the end the NBA is only trying to improve the quality of play in the NBA. They want to try and make sure that these younger guys are a little more prepared which should make us fans alot happier.

  11. #11
    foretaz
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    Default Re: My Take on the NBA Age Limit Rule

    Quote Originally Posted by rommie
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    I think that the NBA is sick of seeing these high schoolers come in and not contribute anything right away. Yes there will always be some busts in any sports draft but this rule should help prevent them somewhat.

    Another thing that alot of people use as an arguement say Lebron, KG, Kobe, TMac, JO, and so on are making impacts in the NBA but my question is how did they do in there first year? Lebron is the only one who played well. Amare Stoudamire made a nice contribution to the Suns but what alot of people don't know is he was 20 early into his NBA career. [His Birthday = 11/16/82.]

    I don't think that there is a single person who can honestly say that one year to develope wouldn't have helped teams project players such as Jonathan Bender, Kwame Brown, Tyson Chandler, Eddy Curry, Desagana Diop and so on.

    Also don't forget that there is more to the NBA than just on the court. There is off the court where you have to be extremely mature to handle it all. That one year in between HS and the NBA should help these players mature off the court too.

    In the end the NBA is only trying to improve the quality of play in the NBA. They want to try and make sure that these younger guys are a little more prepared which should make us fans alot happier.

    despite what anyone might have u believe, this has nothing to do with the product and everything to do with the owners pocketbooks and their lack of control over their own greed.....its greed that motivates them to draft high schoolers....and its greed that has been the motivation behind the age limit....

    everything else is smokescreen...

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    Default Re: My Take on the NBA Age Limit Rule

    Quote Originally Posted by foretaz
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    despite what anyone might have u believe, this has nothing to do with the product and everything to do with the owners pocketbooks and their lack of control over their own greed.....its greed that motivates them to draft high schoolers....and its greed that has been the motivation behind the age limit....

    everything else is smokescreen...
    Uhh ok.....I don't really understand how they have greed drafting high school players and now they are greedy because of the age limit.

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    foretaz
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    Default Re: My Take on the NBA Age Limit Rule

    Quote Originally Posted by rommie
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    Uhh ok.....I don't really understand how they have greed drafting high school players and now they are greedy because of the age limit.
    its very simple....

    they dont want that elusive superstar talent to elude them, so they attempt to find them at a younger and younger age....not unlike colleges used to scout and recruit juniors and seniors, now they are in junior highs and even in elementary in rare cases....

    they do this in the hopes of getting that leg up....well everyone does it and in their haste to try and find that superstar they end up picking alot of people that dont pan out....noones holding a gun to their heads....they could draft college juniors and seniors only....and if they all did that....how many high schoolers would enter the draft???? but its their greed that motivates them to try and find that needle in a haystack....

    and since they are unable to control themselves, they end up wasting millions and millons on bad decisions on high schoolers....so now they want an age limit to force them to not be able to make that decision....

    they cant control their greed, so they ask for an age limit to give them no choice....

  14. #14
    Grumpy Old Man (PD host) able's Avatar
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    Default Re: My Take on the NBA Age Limit Rule

    Quote Originally Posted by rommie
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    Uhh ok.....I don't really understand how they have greed drafting high school players and now they are greedy because of the age limit.
    In which case you perhaps should read the arguments above yours posted more thorough,

    There are a lot of reasons that explain it is nothing but greed.

    It has nothing to do with the product and less to do with the welfare of the kids.
    So Long And Thanks For All The Fish.

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    CA Pacer Fan A-Train's Avatar
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    Default Re: My Take on the NBA Age Limit Rule

    Quote Originally Posted by able
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    It has nothing to do with the product and less to do with the welfare of the kids.
    Do you believe the NBA, as a whole, is a better product now than it was 15-20 years ago?

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    Grumpy Old Man (PD host) able's Avatar
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    Default Re: My Take on the NBA Age Limit Rule

    Quote Originally Posted by A-Train
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    Do you believe the NBA, as a whole, is a better product now than it was 15-20 years ago?
    That would be a relative view from my side certainly, since I only seen NBA games of that era on reels, and "restored" dvd's.

    I think it is better sold these days, to say the product is better or worse would mean there is an independant measure that allows us to compare, but seeing the stars of those days and the ones of today, is there really an improvement?

    If the measurement is pure turnover, then yes it has improved, quality of play however is not measurable but relative, so who am I to judge that.
    Certainly you are not suggesting that the HS players of today make the "play" less then it was then?
    Just in case you are: there are plenty of "great players" that came from HS into the ABA, who set that trend, it was possible uinder a "hardship" clause.
    And unless you want to prove that current superstars as KG, JO, TM, KB are lesser players then their pre-decessors then there is not point in trying to prove that HS players "lessen" the product.
    So Long And Thanks For All The Fish.

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  17. #17
    foretaz
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    Default Re: My Take on the NBA Age Limit Rule

    Quote Originally Posted by A-Train
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    Do you believe the NBA, as a whole, is a better product now than it was 15-20 years ago?
    that would totally depend on what criterion ur using....

    as a whole...my personal opinion would be yes....

    and the fact that it is marketed on a much grander scale would have a tendency to back that up

    it would be somewhat hypocritical to argue that an inferior product was more successful

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    Default Re: My Take on the NBA Age Limit Rule

    Quote Originally Posted by foretaz
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    and the fact that it is marketed on a much grander scale would have a tendency to back that up
    How is it that more marketing means better product?

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    Default Re: My Take on the NBA Age Limit Rule

    Quote Originally Posted by able
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    And unless you want to prove that current superstars as KG, JO, TM, KB are lesser players then their pre-decessors then there is not point in trying to prove that HS players "lessen" the product.
    Kobe Bryant is the only one of those players you mentioned that has even gotten a whiff of a championship.

    Product to me doesn't mean how well a player can play as an individual, it means how well a team, as a whole, understands the game and plays together.

    I don't believe there are too many HS'ers out there who truly understand the game as well as a "professional" should.

  20. #20
    foretaz
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    Default Re: My Take on the NBA Age Limit Rule

    Quote Originally Posted by A-Train
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    How is it that more marketing means better product?
    u have to have a 'better' product to have successful marketing...

    if the increased marketing was not received in a positive manner, then u could definitely argue that the product wasnt better....

    the fact that the product has been so well received globally indicates the product is better....

    more marketing doesnt guarantee a positive reception....ultimately the product dictates the success....not the marketing...

  21. #21
    foretaz
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    Default Re: My Take on the NBA Age Limit Rule

    Quote Originally Posted by A-Train
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    Kobe Bryant is the only one of those players you mentioned that has even gotten a whiff of a championship.

    Product to me doesn't mean how well a player can play as an individual, it means how well a team, as a whole, understands the game and plays together.

    I don't believe there are too many HS'ers out there who truly understand the game as well as a "professional" should.
    my guess is this isnt a high school thing.....this is a player in general thing....

    whether they went to college or not probably doesnt have much to do with it....

    ur talking about how the game has changed....and the high schoolers really have very little to do with that...

  22. #22
    Grumpy Old Man (PD host) able's Avatar
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    Default Re: My Take on the NBA Age Limit Rule

    Quote Originally Posted by A-Train
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    Kobe Bryant is the only one of those players you mentioned that has even gotten a whiff of a championship.

    Product to me doesn't mean how well a player can play as an individual, it means how well a team, as a whole, understands the game and plays together.
    That of course is no argument, please name players who were not drafted out of HS and made an impact so high in the draft that their team became a contender.
    One of the charachteristics of the draft is that the team that ended worst in the previous season has the chance to draft first. This would mean that 1 player made such an impact that they went to contender straight away.
    That by my knowledge has not happened before.
    The nearest would be SanAn the year after they drafted TD, (i.e. his second year int he league) but Mr. Robinson had something to do with that to I would say.

    Most of the players I named do make an impact that is great enough to carry a team, but to carry a team or be a contender are different beasts all together.

    Quote Originally Posted by A-Train
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    I don't believe there are too many HS'ers out there who truly understand the game as well as a "professional" should.
    That can not be blamed on them, but only on the person drafting them for selecting them and not making sure that said understanding is entered into the head of said player.

    But if I look at that list and "add" LeBron and Wade then I think that none of them fail or failed to "understand" what it is to be an NBA player.
    So Long And Thanks For All The Fish.

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  23. #23

    Default Re: My Take on the NBA Age Limit Rule

    I really don't understand people that are so against this age limit. This whole argument that this is to "protect the owners from themselves" is stupid. The purpose is to improve the quality of the NBA game, which should be to the benefit of fans, teams, and the league.

    As a fan, it really doesn't concern me that an 18 year old has to wait to make millions playing basketball. He should be better as a 19 year old player than he was at 18, which is good for me as a fan. I do not care if it is "fair" that a player who wouldn't pan out misses out on his paycheck because one year separated the reality of who they are as a player from their high school legend. Again, all of these players that are weeded out, it's better for me as a fan. It might suck for those players, but if they can't maintain their game and life for one year then I do not weep for them and they didn't deserve to be in the NBA anyway.

    As far as the injuries go ,if Lebron goes to college and blows out a knee, he might slip to the end of the lottery or at worst late first round. Still, he gets an opportunity to play in the league and prove that he is over the injury. He still brings in a healthy paycheck for a few years and if he shows well he will still be a max. player after his first contract. The only person I would feel for is the player who gets injured and it costs him an opportunity to play in the league at all. It would suck but that's called LIFE. They could just as easily get injured their senior year in high school and it would cost them but that doesn't mean we should move the age limit down to 17. We all have mitigating circumstances that we have to deal with as we try to achieve our goals in life. Just because I look like potential CEO when I get hired by a company doesn't mean that will materialize. Maybe I will die of cancer in two years. Maybe a drunk driver will hit me some night and leave me mentally handicapped. It sucks, but that's life and we all live with such risks daily.

    In short, it's absurd to be outraged by this age limit. About the only negative I see from this is that it MIGHT cost one or two kids the opportunity to play in the NBA due to injury. On the other hand, the players drafted will be less of a question mark than they were a year earlier meaning the chances of a bust is less, which is good for the NBA. Players that spend a year or two in college might learn some fundamentals that they otherwise wouldn't have worked on in a typical NBA practice. They might end up better players for it in the long run. Outside of an injury, which I discussed above, I can't see a circumstance where a player would actually come out as a worse player in the long run. Again, this is good for the NBA. This WILL improve the NBA game and has NO CHANCE of hurting it in the long run. I think an age limit of 20 would be optimal and be best for the league, but 19 is a start.

  24. #24
    Grumpy Old Man (PD host) able's Avatar
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    Default Re: My Take on the NBA Age Limit Rule

    Your arguments here wouldn't hold water in a hat.

    Where is a talented player more likely to improve, in the NBA training and playing with the worlds best or in college?
    Do you really think LeBron would have grown better in college, or Kobe, or KG or Wade?

    A better product does not relate to age but to abillity, which is not age related.
    A better product is achieved in many ways but the age limit is not one of them.
    So Long And Thanks For All The Fish.

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  25. #25

    Default Re: My Take on the NBA Age Limit Rule

    Quote Originally Posted by able
    This quote is hidden because you are ignoring this member. Show Quote
    Your arguments here wouldn't hold water in a hat.

    Where is a talented player more likely to improve, in the NBA training and playing with the worlds best or in college?
    Do you really think LeBron would have grown better in college, or Kobe, or KG or Wade?

    A better product does not relate to age but to abillity, which is not age related.
    A better product is achieved in many ways but the age limit is not one of them.
    When I disagree with the entire premise of your argument, I guess we'll have to agree to disagree.

    There is no doubt in my mind that the NBA is NOT the place to be working on fundamentals. Kids that have not learned these in high school (judging by many high school entries, very few have) are far better off to learn these and work them into their games in college than try these things against the best players in the world right off the bat. You don't learn to run before you learn to walk, and the game of basketball is no different in my opinion. I think a player like Kwame Brown is one player that I think might have developed into an all star player if he had gone to college. Instead, he jumped right to the pros and his confidence was shattered when he was trying to learn things and work on things against the best players in the world. He was having no success when doing the things that everyone told him he should be doing because he was trying them for the first time against the best players in the world. Had he went to college or a developmental league first, I have little doubt that he would be a much better player today.

    Even if I suscribed to your theory that they are better off learning the basics against the best players in the world, which I don't, there is no need to waste my NBA dollar, as a fan, on teaching a kid the basics of the game. I don't care to watch it. Let him learn those elsewhere and fill out his game. I don't want to pay to watch him develop basic post moves or the use of his off hand. Let me pay to watch the best player today, not the player that will be better in 2 years.

    By the way, Wade did play in college (all 4 years I think, but I could be wrong about the # of years). I'm not sure why you keep bringing him up. Lebron is the exception that came into the league and was immediately worthy of a starting position. KG and Kobe could've spent a year in college and nobody would've missed much. I don't believe they would be any less of a player today if they had.

    A better product may not be based on age, but I do believe it IS based on experience. Experience is in no small part based on age, although not exclusively. An age limit WILL bring in more experienced players into the league and improve the product. There is absolutely no other reasonable point of view.

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