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Shade
07-23-2007, 01:38 PM
I just finished White Night, the last (currently) book of The Dresden Files. The next one won't be out for almost a year. I feel a little empty inside now. :(

Robobtowncolt
07-23-2007, 01:58 PM
Please don't spoil any books in this thread. Use dedicated threads for that if you're not planning on using spoiler tags. More than just Soup might be impacted (thanks Jay.)

SoupIsGood
07-23-2007, 02:32 PM
Agreed, a DH spoiler thread would be a good idea. I'd be in on it in a day or two.

cactusjack
07-23-2007, 02:50 PM
Stranger in a Strange Land - Robert Heinlein

My all time favorite book by my all time favorite author. I've probably read it fifteen or twenty times since it came out!
As a tribute the the late, great Kurt Vonnegut, I'm re-reading his books. I just finished Sirens of Titan and I'm about to start Breakfast of Champions.

Trader Joe
07-23-2007, 03:11 PM
Agreed, a DH spoiler thread would be a good idea. I'd be in on it in a day or two.

Done. :)

SoupIsGood
07-30-2007, 10:48 PM
http://tangomu.com/books/covers/book/book89.jpg

efx
07-31-2007, 01:19 PM
Reading Atlas Shrugged right now. Damn good.

SoupIsGood
07-31-2007, 01:20 PM
Reading Atlas Shrugged right now. Damn good.

Hey, I'm gonna start that in a few days here. For an essay contest.

I hope it's good. I hated The Fountainhead.

Mourning
07-31-2007, 01:42 PM
Currently reading:

L.N. Tolstoy - "War & Peace". Literary masterpiece about early 19th century upperclass in Czar ruled Russia with the Napoleontic wars raging. Very, very good.

Jared Diamond - "Swords, Horses and Germs". Pretty damn good book that floods a theory about why some civilizations spread out and conquered the world, developed new technologies, appliances, etc and why others did not. What was missing in those civilizations, etc? Definitely a good read.

Regards,

Mourning :cool:

efx
07-31-2007, 07:38 PM
Currently reading:

L.N. Tolstoy - "War & Peace". Literary masterpiece about early 19th century upperclass in Czar ruled Russia with the Napoleontic wars raging. Very, very good.

Jared Diamond - "Swords, Horses and Germs". Pretty damn good book that floods a theory about why some civilizations spread out and conquered the world, developed new technologies, appliances, etc and why others did not. What was missing in those civilizations, etc? Definitely a good read.

Regards,

Mourning :cool:

Isn't that book called "Gun & Germs & Steel" because you're describing jareds book by that name to a T. Just curious :) :)

SycamoreKen
07-31-2007, 11:07 PM
The last book I read was The Stand by S. King. I started it last fall and finished it this summer with about a 4 month break between sittings. It was long, but it wasn't full of filler like many novels I've read.

JayRedd
07-31-2007, 11:51 PM
Isn't that book called "Gun & Germs & Steel" because you're describing jareds book by that name to a T. Just curious :) :)

Has anyone read Jared Diamond's follow-up, Collapse. I really enjoyed Guns, Germs & Steel and was trying to figure out if Collapse was in the same league.

Mourning
08-01-2007, 01:21 AM
Isn't that book called "Gun & Germs & Steel" because you're describing jareds book by that name to a T. Just curious :) :)

Ugh.. yeah true. The Dutch translation though. But, yes, correct.

Planning to get "Collapse" after I have finished it.

Gyron
08-06-2007, 12:12 PM
Baby's First words.....Exciting cover to cover. All 6 pages of 20 or so words and pictures. Best book I've read all week. At least my son thinks so. Then again, he just trys to eat it. So I think he approves of it anyways.

LoneGranger33
08-06-2007, 12:17 PM
Has anyone read Jared Diamond's follow-up, Collapse. I really enjoyed Guns, Germs & Steel and was trying to figure out if Collapse was in the same league.

I'm reading it now - well, I was until the school year started (and I haven't gotten back to it thanks to a relatively large summer reading list). I actually didn't read GG&S, so I can't compare it to anything. This one is a bit slow in my opinion, but not a terrible read.

Mourning
08-06-2007, 01:36 PM
Baby's First words.....Exciting cover to cover. All 6 pages of 20 or so words and pictures. Best book I've read all week. At least my son thinks so. Then again, he just trys to eat it. So I think he approves of it anyways.

:lol:

cactusjack
08-08-2007, 01:44 PM
Reading Atlas Shrugged right now. Damn good.

If you liked Atlas Shrugged, you should try The Fountainhead. Rand was an excellent writer.

Soupisgood, if you didn't like the Fountainhead, you probably won't care for Atlas Shrugged. It goes even deeper into Rand's Objectivist philosophy.

PaceBalls
08-13-2007, 12:12 PM
I have been reading this great series that has me totally immersed called "Malazan, Book of the Fallen" by Steven Erickson. I just finished book three "Memories of Ice". I have been not getting enough sleep because of these books.

If you enjoy the Fantasy genre and are looking for books that are aimed more at adults than teenagers, you should check them out.

The first book starts off a little hard to follow, he has a very unique writing style and I found myself wondering if I was really reading the first book in the series, as it seemed like it was written as if you knew the background already. But it is still very well written and the 2nd book "Deadhouse Gates" is just amazing.

Anyway check em out.

Gyron
08-27-2007, 11:11 AM
I just picked up "Lone Survivor" last night. Can't wait to get started.

Its the true story first person account of the lone Navy Seal that survived the Al queda attack in afganistan that killed an entire Seal squad with the exception of himself because he was blown off the side of the mountain by an RPG. He then fought of the alqueda fighters and crawled several miles to a village where the afgani's hid him until US troops were able to rescue him.


A friend of mine told me about the book. I'm a slow reader so it may take me several weeks, but I'm looking forward to reading this one.

SoupIsGood
09-03-2007, 09:29 PM
If you liked Atlas Shrugged, you should try The Fountainhead. Rand was an excellent writer.

Soupisgood, if you didn't like the Fountainhead, you probably won't care for Atlas Shrugged. It goes even deeper into Rand's Objectivist philosophy.

I like Atlas Shrugged a little more than I did The Fountainhead. It's a little less boring.

I think she's kind of clunky as a writer. She's good at keeping suspense (at least within AS), but a lot of her stuff is just... unimaginative. I understand that the point is her philosophy, though, so I kind of get why she does certain things... sort of.

sweabs
12-26-2007, 02:41 AM
Got a couple books for Christmas today.

Just finished reading The Game Within The Game by Walt Frazier. It's a quick read, but he shares some interesting perspectives. He's old-school in his views, and takes a lot of jabs at today's game (but rightfully so in most parts)...but you have to prepare yourself for a lot of "In my day, it was better because.....". I'm not complaining, however, as I found myself agreeing with a lot of what he had to say. It's more of just a warning to those who can't take that stuff. The added bonus is that Clyde wrote it...so you get all of his little rhymes mixed in if you find them as funny as I do.

The other book is Who's Afriad of a Large Black Man by Barkley which I'm looking forward to starting tomorrow.

kester99
12-26-2007, 04:35 AM
My all time favorite book by my all time favorite author. I've probably read it fifteen or twenty times since it came out!
As a tribute the the late, great Kurt Vonnegut, I'm re-reading his books. I just finished Sirens of Titan and I'm about to start Breakfast of Champions.

I read Breakfast of Champions when it was first published, and was pretty blown away by the scene in which Vonnegut appears to Trout above the interstate median (I-465?) during the blizzard...maybe the one passage from any novel I've read which will stay in my memory the longest.

So. Anyway, were you aware that a novel by Kilgore Trout appeared on the store shelves a few months later? Perfect, I thought, what an absolutely clever gimmick by Vonnegut!

Well, I just read this:

At least one actual published work is attributed to a Kilgore Trout: the novel Venus on the Half-Shell, written by Philip Josť Farmer but published under the name "Kilgore Trout." For some time it was assumed that Vonnegut must have written it; when the truth of its authorship came out, Vonnegut was reported as being "not amused"; in an issue of the semi-prozine The Alien Critic/Science Fiction Review, published by Richard E. Geis, Farmer claimed to have received an angry, obscenity-laden telephone call from Vonnegut about it.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kilgore_Trout
---------------------------

I still think it was a brilliant move...I wonder if Vonnegut ever came to think so? Probably not, considering the obscenity-laced bit there.

* Hey, rcarey and the newman8r! Do you know what that thing is to the left, and slightly above, the word 'Hey" over there?

obnoxiousmodesty
12-26-2007, 10:36 AM
I'm currently reading The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon. It's quite the fascinating read and unlike anything I've read before. I understand why it's been critically acclaimed.

Major Cold
12-26-2007, 11:58 AM
The last book I read was The Stand by S. King. I started it last fall and finished it this summer with about a 4 month break between sittings. It was long, but it wasn't full of filler like many novels I've read.


If you like the Stand you will ;love King's Dark Tower series. If his books are the solar system then the Tower is Jupiter. The Stand, Salems Lot, Hearts in Atlantis and many others share characters with the Tower series. It is pretty incredible. I am rereading them this year.

sweabs
12-26-2007, 02:05 PM
* Hey, rcarey and the newman8r! Do you know what that thing is to the left, and slightly above, the word 'Hey" over there?
Argh...that there looks like a snowflake. Are we getting more damn snow...damn...I'll get the shovel.

kester99
12-26-2007, 02:41 PM
Argh...that there looks like a snowflake. Are we getting more damn snow...damn...I'll get the shovel.

Good guess. And a very understandable one, from up there in your northern idyll...but NOPE!

* That there is a close-up of a chicken's a**ho**....per Vonnegut's Breakfast of Champions, which features many of Kurt's snazzy drawings, and in which he informs us that a chicken was an animal which once lived in many parts of North America.

Kegboy
12-26-2007, 02:47 PM
Vince Flynn's latest, Protect and Defend. I really enjoyed it, I'd argue it's easily one of his best. The torture scenes were tough to get through, though.

idioteque
12-26-2007, 03:27 PM
I got like 9 or 10 Kurt Vonnegut books for Christmas. When I graduate from college in May I can't wait to start reading what I want.

Raskolnikov
12-28-2007, 07:24 AM
The new life - Ohan Pamuk

JayRedd
12-29-2007, 05:01 PM
Reading 1491.

It came out a few years back and is basically in the "pop-anthropology" genre (think Jared Diamond's Guns, Germs and Steel and works by William McNeill) and is about the pre-Columbus history of the Western Hemisphere. It deals mostly with dispelling the myth on "uncivilized savages" roaming nomadically through the plains and talks about the vast and complex civilizations that existed and the empires that ruled. There is, of course, much discussion of the Incas, Mayans and North American native confederations, but it also goes back well before that to those civilizations that preceded these more well-known cultures.

I'm only about half-way through, but it's very compelling.

Arcadian
01-02-2008, 10:31 PM
I got Pynchon's Against the Day. I expect to finish it next Christmas.

efx
01-03-2008, 11:31 AM
Still reading atlas shrugged. Great writing in the technical sense but horrible ideology and now in the middle it's starting to definately drag.

kester99
01-03-2008, 08:36 PM
Finished The Baroque Cycle trilogy by Neal Stephenson for the second time. Brilliant stuff. It's an adventure story spanning the late 17th and early 18th centuries, featuring alchemists, cavaliers, pirates, Isaac Newton, the king of France, the rotting head of Oliver Cromwell, William of Orange, Queen Anne's War, the founding of MIT, Quakers with sidearms, the Spanish Inquisition, conquistadores with Tourettes Syndrome and much, much more.

Each of the three books pushes about 850 pages. But it's a hell of a yarn, and a pretty neat history lesson.

Be warned, the publisher has started breaking the books up into smaller chunks and publishing them under new titles....there are three books only in this trilogy (duh), to whit: Quicksilver, the Confusion, and the System of the World.

Am looking forward to the Cryptonomicon, also by Stephenson, which takes place in the 20th Century. It was written first, but I came across the others before I'd heard of the Cryptonomicon, which apparently features descendants of some of the Baroque Cycle's characters.

Raskolnikov
01-04-2008, 09:26 AM
The Godfather's revenge - Mark Winegardner

Takes a bit long until something actually happens (that is someone gets killed), but it's worth it.

idioteque
02-23-2008, 06:35 PM
I'm reading World War Z by Max Brooks right now. It is written in the style of a journalist interviewing survivors of a decade long war between humanity and zombies in which most, but not all, human beings were wiped out. It is really less about zombies and more about the human race and our flaws, Brooks really lets everyone have it. Pretty interesting book, however, and worth a read.

Ragnar
02-26-2008, 11:55 AM
Still reading atlas shrugged. Great writing in the technical sense but horrible ideology and now in the middle it's starting to definately drag.


Hehe I thought the exact opposite. The ideology has a lot of good points (I am not suggesting swallowing the whole thing kit and kaboodle) but her writing style is horrible.

My most recent books have been Atomic Lobster and Hurricane Punch by Tim Dorsey, Nature Girl by Carl Hiaasen and Blond Faith by Walter Mosley.

If you like the Easy Rawlins stories you must read Blond Faith. (there was a movie called Devil in a Blue dress that was an Easy Rawlins book)

I was a little disappointed in Nature Girl the crazy former governor was not in the book and he is Hiaasens best character.

Shade
02-26-2008, 03:53 PM
The new Dresden Files is less than two months away! :yay:

Kraft
02-26-2008, 04:05 PM
I not so long ago finished East of Eden and The Edge of Sadness.

I can't decide what to start next ... leaning toward Humboldt's Gift.

BigRik
02-26-2008, 11:49 PM
I just finished The Family by Mario Puzo. Now reading The Gemini Contenders by Robert Ludlum.

idioteque
02-27-2008, 03:55 PM
Currently reading the Audacity of Hope by Barack Obama.

I am only like 65 pages into it but it seems interesting, although I am yet to really delve into the later chapters which everyone tells me have the real susbstance of the book.

If it's worth it I'll reccomend it to Uncle Buck :) so he can find out what Obama believes and then most likely criticize it for the next 8 months!

JK, UB. :)

ABADays
02-27-2008, 04:02 PM
It use to be I couldn't read unless I was on a plane. Since I got over here I read about a book a week.

Last two:

Going Long (history of the AFL) - very good read
Pan Am 103 - very sad, frustrating read.

travmil
02-28-2008, 12:23 PM
Surely You're Joking Mr. Feynman

A collection of true stories by Richard P. Feynman, Nobel Prize winning physicist who worked on the atomic bomb, and served on the commission that investigated the NASA Challenger disaster. It's pretty funny stuff, really.

sweabs
02-29-2008, 03:37 PM
Who's Afraid of a Large Black Man?

This one is by Charles Barkley (and edited by Michael Wilbon). I just finished reading it, and enjoyed it thoroughly.

Barkley interviews some very important people in their industry/community, etc. and sparks some thought-provoking dialogue regarding race issues in the USA. I learned a great deal from some of the people, and truly appreciated what many of them had to say.

The interviewed: Tiger Woods, Barack Obama, Samuel L. Jackson, Bill Clinton, George Lopez, Steven Leder, Ice Cube, Marita Golden, Peter Guber, Jesse Jackson, Robert Johnson, Morgan Freeman, and Marian Wright Edelman.

Excellent book.

kester99
03-03-2008, 02:43 AM
The Song of Ice and Fire series by George R.R. Martin....if you like fantasy. This is the best thing I've come across since Tolkien. I know, I know....it's been said.

Martin's political and military focus make this series...no elves, sorry.

Raskolnikov
03-03-2008, 03:21 AM
Beyaz kale - Orhan Pamuk

Gyron
03-07-2008, 04:08 PM
I just picked up "Lone Survivor" last night. Can't wait to get started.

Its the true story first person account of the lone Navy Seal that survived the Al queda attack in afganistan that killed an entire Seal squad with the exception of himself because he was blown off the side of the mountain by an RPG. He then fought of the alqueda fighters and crawled several miles to a village where the afgani's hid him until US troops were able to rescue him.


A friend of mine told me about the book. I'm a slow reader so it may take me several weeks, but I'm looking forward to reading this one.

I finally picked this book back up on Monday and started reading again. I got hooked on it and read the whole book this week. Half the book today since I'm sitting at home with a sick child while he's taken a couple long naps.

GREAT GREAT book. It is very sad in the section toward the end of the first big battle.

And after reading this it just makes me want to go after Al Queda and the Taliban that much more. :mad: There are some truly brutal spots in the book involving graphic descriptions of the battle and the injuries they are sustaining as they fight of the attack of the Taliban and Al Queda. The Seal's faced and fought against truly amazing odds and lasted a LONG time against a force far superior in size and armament, but not in skill and training. At one point, the estimated size of the taliban force against the 4 Seals was 200 to 4. Unbelievable odds.

As long as you can handle the brutal stories of the Seal's Deaths on that Mountainside, it is truly a great read. :cry: And once they get into the battle portion of the book(about half way through) you won't want to put it down.

I also learned a lot about Pashtun tribal customs and law and what led to the Pasthun tribe protecting the badly injured Seal against all odds and aginst the Taliban that could have meant the complete annailation of their entire village. But they stood strong against the Taliban and refused to let them have or kill the injured Seal.

The first half of the book is a description of the seals, their training and what it takes to become a seal so you can understand how truly amazing these soilders really are.

If you like military stories, recounts of military battles, etc, this book is for you.

tdubb03
03-08-2008, 03:59 AM
I'm about four stories into David Sedaris's "Dress Your Family In Corudroy and Denim." He's Amy Sedaris's, of Strangers With Candy fame, little brother. I'm really enjoying it so far. His tales of a fairly upper-class upbringing coupled with being a gay man make for great satirical stories. The man's got a real touch for being witty and amusing without being obnoxiously so.

Elgin56
03-10-2008, 10:01 AM
I have just finished reading, Marley & Me, by John Grogan. If you have ever owned a dog, this book should bring smiles to your faces. The book is more than just about the dog, Marley, and made me laugh as the husband and wife chronicled their lifes ups and downs all intertwined with their bad behaved, but loveable dog.

Gyron
03-10-2008, 11:35 AM
I have just finished reading, Marley & Me, by John Grogan. If you have ever owned a dog, this book should bring smiles to your faces. The book is more than just about the dog, Marley, and made me laugh as the husband and wife chronicled their lifes ups and downs all intertwined with their bad behaved, but loveable dog.


That is such a greta book. I read it about 2 years ago. The writer has a tremendous ability to convey his experiences in a very humorous manner.

Make sure you check out the letters online at the website. He has thousands of letters he recieved after the article and the book came out from people describing their world's worst dog. Some of the are just flat out hilarious.

I read this not too long after I lost my first dog who had lived to be almost 15 years old. I actually cried when I got to the end when Marley passed away. The book touched my heart that much. And I'm not one of those guys who ever cry's.

SoupIsGood
03-10-2008, 11:52 AM
http://www.psych.mcgill.ca/photos/brain.jpg
http://www.maa.org/reviews/images/wheremath.jpg

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/413KF46S3ZL._SS500_.jpg

Elgin56
03-10-2008, 12:16 PM
That is such a greta book. I read it about 2 years ago. The writer has a tremendous ability to convey his experiences in a very humorous manner.

Make sure you check out the letters online at the website. He has thousands of letters he recieved after the article and the book came out from people describing their world's worst dog. Some of the are just flat out hilarious.

I read this not too long after I lost my first dog who had lived to be almost 15 years old. I actually cried when I got to the end when Marley passed away. The book touched my heart that much. And I'm not one of those guys who ever cry's.


I don't shed tears very often, however I am with you, I cried like a baby.

I now have two dogs, both dogs were unwanted and basicaly strays. I don't even want to think about the day when they will pass, as they have become part of me. One is a beagle and the other a border collie mix, talk about two different personalities.

DisplacedKnick
03-10-2008, 10:46 PM
Reading The Peloponnesian War by Donald Kagan - the short version, not the 3-volume one.

It's OK but not grabbing me. Maybe because I've read Thucydides, Xenophon, Hanson & a few others - I already know what happens and there's not much new ground being covered. Right now the Athenians are about to go into Sicily and get their asses kicked.

Need to finish though - for some reason I've never read Gilgamesh and it's next on the shelf.

SycamoreKen
05-12-2008, 11:52 PM
Man are we an illiterate bunch or what? Anyway, I just finished reading Endgame, 1945 The Missing Final Chapter of World War II by David Stafford.

A must read for history and non history buffs alike. It recapped the last few weeks of the war and the year or so afterwards. The Nazis were a sick bunch of people. I had no idea how bad it really was until reading this book. It really made me think hard about what has happened in the past and how some of those very ame things still pop up and we don't bat an eye.

Time to wrap this up before it gets banished to UN PD. Again a great read.

Raskolnikov
05-14-2008, 08:02 AM
So long and thanks for all the fish - Douglas Adams

Reading all 5 of the Hitchhiker's books. In a couple of words, they're all wonderful, great, incredible, amazing. Hats off to mister Adams. That reminds me, I was thinking of buying a hat one of these days. A cool cowboy hat.

indygeezer
05-14-2008, 08:44 AM
So long and thanks for all the fish - Douglas Adams

Reading all 5 of the Hitchhiker's books. In a couple of words, they're all wonderful, great, incredible, amazing. Hats off to mister Adams. That reminds me, I was thinking of buying a hat one of these days. A cool cowboy hat.

Rodian Romanovich Raskolnikov (from one of MY personal Fav books):
You do realize the Douglas Adams quote is also from Abel's sig right?

Raskolnikov
05-14-2008, 10:30 AM
Yeah, I remember something like that, from back in the days when he still used to post, and I didn't have sigs turned off. Btw, it's not only a quote, it's also the title of the 4th book in the Hitchhiker's series.

Obviously, C&P is also one of my all-time favourite books...

indygeezer
05-14-2008, 12:12 PM
Yeah, I remember something like that, from back in the days when he still used to post, and I didn't have sigs turned off. Btw, it's not only a quote, it's also the title of the 4th book in the Hitchhiker's series.

Obviously, C&P is also one of my all-time favourite books...


I hated that book in college but as soon as the class was over I really learned to appreciate it.

Will Galen
05-28-2008, 11:05 AM
I can't believe I haven't posted in this thread! Must have been another thread that had something to do with books.

As for me I probably have a thousand books in my home and that's with giving books away. I always have a book in the bathroom to read, otherwise I wouldn't know what to do. I'm only half kidding. I have slow bowels and I dislike just sitting there waiting. Yeah, I know, too much information! (grin)

I've had library cards where ever I've lived. That means as far away as Okinawa. Most of what I read is escapism. But I have a lot of books on religion too. I don't remember the exact count but there are over 50 bibles translated into English and I have about half of them.

My favorite writers are many and varied across genres. The following list of writers is a very incomplete list of my favorites. I've read about everything most of them have written.

Louis Lamour, Westerns
Dick Weber, Sci-fi. I especially like his Honor Harrington series.
JA Vance, mostly police novels.
Douglas Preston, scary stories
Lincoln Child, scary stories
Lee Child, I like his Jack Reacher novels.
John Grisham, I love court room dramas.
David Baldacci, Contemporary novels
Edgar Rice Burroughs, a childhood favorite. Tarzan Novels.
Stephen Frey, Contemporary novels
John Sadnford, Murder mysteries.
Orson Scott Card, You like games you will love "Ender's Game."
Dick Francis, horse racing novels.

Right now I'm reading Elizabeth Lowell novels. She started out writing romance stories, but now her stories are mainstream and she's writing for Avon. The first novel I read of hers was, The wrong Hostage. I would recommend that, and Innocent as Sin. I just got through reading a series of four books of hers about a family called the Donovans who are gem traders. I would recommend all of them, Amber Beach, Jade Island, Pearl Cove, and Midnight in Ruby Bayou.

One thing she does well is her homework. She writes like she knows what she's talking about. Her descriptions of the gem trade are outstanding. I don't like the sex she writes about in her books for Avon so I just skip it. That means I probably won't read much of anything she wrote before she switched to Avon. Still she's a good read.

count55
05-28-2008, 12:45 PM
Just finished No Country for Old Men by Cormac McCarthy, in an attempt to understand the movie ending better. Well written book, easy read, but I think his premise is overly pessimistic, almost to the point of being bull****.

Also, just finished Fareed Zakaria's The Post-American World, which I thought was an excellent and interesting read. As always, there are things to agree with and things to disagree with, but I thought it was a good perspective.

Keep wandering through Marcus Zusak's The Book Thief, but can't quite get in the right frame of mind for it.

SoupIsGood
05-28-2008, 01:42 PM
http://images.amazon.com/images/P/0061316865.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg


Interesting, especially within the context (tehe) of his other work. Not sure what I totally think of it, yet.

Arcadian
06-12-2008, 10:54 AM
I'm still plowing through Against the Day.

Mostly bumping the thread so people will know we are good readers.

SoupIsGood
06-12-2008, 12:16 PM
Shakespeare and the Question of Theory

DisplacedKnick
06-12-2008, 12:54 PM
An Introduction to Anglo-Saxon England by Peter Blair

PacerPete
06-12-2008, 01:20 PM
I'm still plowing through Against the Day.

Mostly bumping the thread so people will know we are good readers.

Thanks for finding this. If SEARCH would have found it, I wouldn't have started a new thread. :dance:
I stand corrected, we do know how to read after all.

ABADays
06-12-2008, 01:32 PM
That is such a greta book. I read it about 2 years ago. The writer has a tremendous ability to convey his experiences in a very humorous manner.

Make sure you check out the letters online at the website. He has thousands of letters he recieved after the article and the book came out from people describing their world's worst dog. Some of the are just flat out hilarious.

I read this not too long after I lost my first dog who had lived to be almost 15 years old. I actually cried when I got to the end when Marley passed away. The book touched my heart that much. And I'm not one of those guys who ever cry's.

I just read this as well. It's a really well written book. It opened a few old wounds as my cocker had to be put to sleep just before I came to Iraq but it also was a very funny and very sensitive read. If you are a dog lover, even a pet lover, you should read it. Take Gyron's recommendation to visit the website too.

indygeezer
06-12-2008, 01:40 PM
Just finished A Painted House by John Grisham. Not his usual fare and could be considered slow by many. I really liked it....took me back to my childhood.

Like Will.....Louis Lamour westerns (Zane Grey too) for light reading.

Sci fi

I don't do much of the heavy reading anymore with dry eyes it gets tiring and sometimes painful to read long.

PacerPete
06-12-2008, 06:01 PM
Just finished A Painted House by John Grisham. Not his usual fare and could be considered slow by many. I really liked it....took me back to my childhood.

Like Will.....Louis Lamour westerns (Zane Grey too) for light reading.

Sci fi

I don't do much of the heavy reading anymore with dry eyes it gets tiring and sometimes painful to read long.

I read this several years ago and enjoyed it. Most didn't care for it. They also made a TV movie out of it which was pretty good, but if you hadn't already read the book, it was a bit hard to follow.

Hoop
06-12-2008, 06:02 PM
I read a book once.

Mourning
06-12-2008, 06:22 PM
I read a book once.

Congrats! :-p


;)


Just finished reading "Child 44" which was entertaining. It plays in the Soviet Union at the last days of Stalin reign. You follow a secret serves political officer that gets into huge problems with his agency and the state when he actively starts pursuing a serial-killer the system says can not exist, because there's no crime in the Soviet Union and certainly not something like a serial-killer. Not too complicated, but definitely a thrilling read.

Moving on to Dostojvski's "The Karamazov Brothers". Starting tonight :).

Regards,

Mourning :cool:

Mourning
06-12-2008, 06:31 PM
Reading The Peloponnesian War by Donald Kagan - the short version, not the 3-volume one.

It's OK but not grabbing me.

Yeah, I read the short-version aswell. I thought it was pretty good, actually. Not very scientific, but that's not it's purpose either. Just telling the story without getting too detailed I guess.

Anyone read some of Tom Holland's books "Persian Fire: The First World Empire and the Battle for the West" (link: http://www.amazon.com/Persian-Fire-First-Empire-Battle/dp/0385513119)and "Rubicon: The Last Years of the Roman Republic" (link: http://www.amazon.com/Rubicon-Last-Years-Roman-Republic/dp/1400078970)? Have seen them and on more then one occassion had them in my hands, but at the last moment came up with other reads that I then subsequently got.

Regards,

Mourning :cool:

indygeezer
06-12-2008, 06:49 PM
I ordered a book from Amazon.com today...."This is your Brain on Music" written by a former rocker who earned his PhD in Psych and is studying how music affects various areas of the brain and thus it's impact on our Psyche.

Arcadian
06-12-2008, 09:36 PM
I forgot that I also read some Hesse fairy tales.

SoupIsGood
06-12-2008, 09:38 PM
How's ATD going?

Arcadian
06-12-2008, 09:41 PM
I do enjoy it. Just need to quit counting and read. It just is a lot of words, plots and tangents. Enjoyable and interesting if not exactly plot driven. I haven't given up on it like I did Mason Dixon.

PacerPete
06-17-2008, 03:08 PM
I've been "reprimanded" that PD does indeed read books, however I now see the Book Thread has fallen into disuse upon page 2, so I'm not quite convinced. :-p I must bump this thread since I read another book.

Nelson deMille, Night Fall

a novel about TWA 800 crash. Good ending, not the part where you figure out what the ending is, but the part where you don't.

Warning: I am reading yet another book and expect to be done before this thread falls off page 1 again.

jeffg-body
06-18-2008, 12:28 AM
I have been reading Steven Kings Thinner.

Pig Nash
06-18-2008, 03:03 AM
I just finished Still Life with Woodpecker by Tom Robbins and am currently on Jitterbug Perfume by the same author. They're pretty good, funny in bits.

kester99
06-18-2008, 05:39 AM
I just finished Still Life with Woodpecker by Tom Robbins and am currently on Jitterbug Perfume by the same author. They're pretty good, funny in bits.


Have you tried the hearts and diamonds bomb yet? Who knew potassium permanganate could be so useful?

Even Cowgirls Get the Blues is a good one by Robbins also....and a very nice Emmylou Harris song as well.

Gyron
06-18-2008, 10:29 AM
I have been reading Steven Kings Thinner.

Excellent Book. 1000000000 times better than the movie.

Pig Nash
06-18-2008, 07:53 PM
Have you tried the hearts and diamonds bomb yet? Who knew potassium permanganate could be so useful?

Even Cowgirls Get the Blues is a good one by Robbins also....and a very nice Emmylou Harris song as well.

No Still Life was my first. It was the one (along with Jitterbug Perfume) that my mom had in the house.

PacerPete
06-20-2008, 12:36 AM
Janet Evanovich, Fearless Fourteen

Doesn't disappoint, in same mode as older editions, but steps out of it a bit, i.e. no reference to some old characters, no visiting funeral homes, less eating dinner at Mom's, no references to Tasty Cakes, she drives the same car throughout, less bounty hunting, more side adventure, only a couple of explosions. Enjoyable, yet also fewer outright guffaws.

For those that don't know, this is a comedy series about an incompetent female bounty hunter.

PacerPete
06-25-2008, 08:25 PM
Taleb, Fooled by Randomness

JayRedd
06-26-2008, 11:45 AM
Taleb, Fooled by Randomness

Am about to start Black Swan.

Just finished The Long Tail. Another in the "pop economics" category that is a great, quick read.

Ragnar
06-26-2008, 03:44 PM
I did not even know fourteen was out yet. I guess there is a trip to the bookstore on my way home tonight!!

PacerPete
06-26-2008, 04:30 PM
Am about to start Black Swan.

Just finished The Long Tail. Another in the "pop economics" category that is a great, quick read.

I have the Black Swan on my bookshelf. I think I'll open it up after I finish what I think is the latest Grisham, The Appeal

And I'll check out The Long Tail as well. Thanks.

JayRedd
06-26-2008, 05:44 PM
I have the Black Swan on my bookshelf. I think I'll open it up after I finish what I think is the latest Grisham, The Appeal

And I'll check out The Long Tail as well. Thanks.

This is the guy's website (he's the editor of Wired) and it describes the general premise.

http://www.longtail.com/the_long_tail/faq/index.html

PacerPete
06-27-2008, 11:37 AM
This is the guy's website (he's the editor of Wired) and it describes the general premise.

http://www.longtail.com/the_long_tail/faq/index.html

Very interesting. Thanks. I'm looking forward to the book.

It appears that it may describe the ongoing rift I have with Marsh Supermarkets. :box: They don't appear to care that what I want is in the yellow zone, they only stock in the red zone. Fortunately for me, other local stores do stock a bit into the yellow, so I won't starve.

In Marsh's case, in their zeal to protect profit margin, they have reduced their revenue. Makes for a gentler and simpler place that no one wants to shop at. Remember when there weren't so many beer choices? Supermarkets had a massive beer aisle. They still do, but now half of it is Bud and Miller Lite. While it's not online, I today am making a beer run to Kahn's to stock up since no grocery I go to has ANY of the beer I like to drink.
OK [/rant].

jeffg-body
06-28-2008, 01:42 AM
Actually I have been writing a book the last 5 years about soldiers and coming home with PTSD. I'm about 90% finished. It is called "Broken Soldier".

Stryder
06-28-2008, 01:27 PM
Currently reading:

Casseret and Doull's Basic Science of Poisons...

Yippee.

PacerPete
06-28-2008, 05:08 PM
Currently reading:

Casseret and Doull's Basic Science of Poisons...

Yippee.

The new edition features....new content on chemical terrorism....This 6th edition of a classic toxicology text picks up where the last edition left off, keeping all the fundamental pedagogically important components while adding current research toxicology. The addition of more risk assessment is an excellent enhancement to this edition.......The book is neat in appearance.....
Rating
3 Stars from Doody

I understand your excitement now. :dance:

Wu-Gambino
06-28-2008, 06:00 PM
I'm trying to get back into books and make sure my brain is in decent shape before heading off to college. Right now I'm reading the Vonnegut classic, Breakfast of Champions.

Stryder
06-28-2008, 08:23 PM
The new edition features....new content on chemical terrorism....This 6th edition of a classic toxicology text picks up where the last edition left off, keeping all the fundamental pedagogically important components while adding current research toxicology. The addition of more risk assessment is an excellent enhancement to this edition.......The book is neat in appearance.....
Rating
3 Stars from Doody

I understand your excitement now. :dance:

This isn't the worst of them though. Try Goldfrank's Toxicological Emergencies! Haha.

Pig Nash
06-29-2008, 12:58 AM
I'm trying to get back into books and make sure my brain is in decent shape before heading off to college. Right now I'm reading the Vonnegut classic, Breakfast of Champions.

First Vonnegut I ever read, love it!

PacerPete
06-29-2008, 01:41 PM
This isn't the worst of them though. Try Goldfrank's Toxicological Emergencies! Haha.

No no. I've dipped my toe in and didn't like it much, I ain't jumping in head first. :-o

317Kim
07-01-2008, 01:03 PM
As Simple As Snow
The Philosophies of Andy Warhol

SoupIsGood
07-01-2008, 01:15 PM
You Must Be This Happy To Enter - Elizabeth Crane (meh - interesting in bits)
Infinite Jest (again) - DFW (*swoon*)
To Be and Not To Be: Negatation and Metadrama in Hamlet - James Calderwood (God this was horrible)
Drinking Coffee Elsewhere - ZZ Packer (this was pretty great, can't wait for her novel!)
Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus - Wittgenstein (SO. COOL.)
Hamlet in Purgatory - Greenblatt (Never been too crazy for the new historicism, but dude's a very excellent and clear writer).
Hard-Boiled Wonderland and the End of the World - Murakami (Didn't actually read this, quit after 100, ****ing hell it was bad)
Ficciones - Borges (YES!)
Scattered stuff by Calvino, while sitting in bookstores/libraries (boring, not that interesting)

Mourning
07-01-2008, 01:21 PM
"The Karamozov Brothers" from Dostojewski.

Will start reading that after finishing reading "Wild Swans" for the second time (LOVE that book).

SoupIsGood
07-01-2008, 01:25 PM
I started Wild Swans but had to give it back to the person who loaned me it. The foot-crushing thing made me squirm though.

Mourning
07-01-2008, 03:10 PM
I started Wild Swans but had to give it back to the person who loaned me it. The foot-crushing thing made me squirm though.

Yup! One of the horrible "habits" in Imperial China. Can you believe that those feet had to be broken several times, otherwise they would heal? Incredible.

Other stuff like committing suicide as a concubine when your "lord" died or killing yourself if you disaggree with your husband on certain issues to make your point.

SoupIsGood
07-21-2008, 01:05 PM
White Teeth
Watchmen

Pig Nash
07-21-2008, 04:03 PM
I just read Survivor by Chuck Pahlaniuk, it was quite good, and I'll have to pick up some more of his. I also picked up The Color of Magic and will probably start reading that soon.

JayRedd
07-21-2008, 07:36 PM
Survivor and Lullaby are my two favorite Chucky P books.

Arcadian
07-21-2008, 07:56 PM
I read Dairy. Decent but didn't make me want to read more.

I'm rereading On The Road. When I read it in college I thought Sal was cool. Now I think he is a broader line bum.

kester99
07-21-2008, 08:31 PM
spook country -- William Gibson.

OK. Standard Gibson, which is better than most. Introduces locative art...the 'eversion' of virtual reality. And some cool spy stuff.

Pig Nash
07-21-2008, 11:35 PM
Survivor and Lullaby are my two favorite Chucky P books.

Those were the two that sounded the best from the backs, i just chose survivor because it had a more interesting first page (like just because of how it's numbered and chaptered)

SoupIsGood
07-21-2008, 11:45 PM
I've never been able to get into Chuck P's stuff.

Pig Nash
07-22-2008, 12:04 AM
He guards it very closely, so that doesn't surprise me. :-p

JayRedd
07-22-2008, 06:31 PM
I'm rereading On The Road. When I read it in college I thought Sal was cool. Now I think he is a broader line bum.

How dare you.

Arcadian
07-22-2008, 07:08 PM
If you think Sal Paradise is a glorified hobo, you might be over 30. As I read it I just want to tell him to get a hair cut.

Pig Nash
07-22-2008, 07:46 PM
There are nights where I think Sal Paradise was right, boys and girls in america, they have such a sad time together.

Since86
08-11-2008, 03:04 PM
I've just started Mistaken Identity, about the two girls who were involved in the Taylor University crash.

Talk about emotional piece. I'm only about 80pages in and it's some hard reading.

pig norton
08-12-2008, 05:30 PM
I'm almost finished with A Game Of Thrones. It's really quite good, but I don't think I can catch up with the series before the next one comes out.

t1hs0n
08-12-2008, 05:41 PM
I am reading a book called "A Short History of Nearly Everything" at the moment. It is quite interesting.

Apperently Edwin Hubble of telescope fame was quite the douchebag. Who would have known?

Pig Nash
08-16-2008, 12:43 AM
Have you read any of Bryson's other books? he writes some really good travel books, just like about his trip not like boring "where to see in blah blah" books.

ilive4sports
08-16-2008, 02:09 AM
Im just starting to read Sex, Drugs and Cocoa Puffs by Chuck Klosterman. My English professor had us read the first essay in it and I thought it was hilarious. He recommended the book and since I am flying from Harrisburg to California today I figured this is a good time to read.

t1hs0n
08-19-2008, 06:32 PM
Have you read any of Bryson's other books? he writes some really good travel books, just like about his trip not like boring "where to see in blah blah" books.


No, I have not. I started reading something else just the other day, so I will have to que up some of his other works to read later.

count55
02-05-2009, 05:07 PM
Now that I'm in a car for three plus hours a day, I've been listening to audiobooks on my iPod.

Last week, I listened to Angler by Barton Gellmann. This is about the Cheney Vice Presidency. It's not a positive book, but I found it to be very interesting. It portrayed someone who probably would be a fantastic CEO. Cheney was very principled, though he followed those principles in pursuit of an ideology that I find somewhat questionable, at least in the context of the unitary executive. Though critical of Cheney, I felt that Gellmann made him more human, pushing away from the Darth Vader caricature and more towards the basic motivation. I don't expect everyone to like the book, and I'm certainly not trying to push a political view, but it is an in depth study into one of the most active Vice Presidencies in history.

I'm currently listening to the second of three books by Sarah Vowell. The first was The Assassination Vacation, which basically tours sites of the assassinations of Lincoln, Garfield, and McKinley, giving you a lot of backstory. It's humorous, but it has more lefty leanings in some of the editorial content. There are long stretches where it's just about the history, but, in fair warning, when it talks about today, she's an unabashed Bush hater, for lack of a better word.

The book I'm listening to now is called The Partly Cloudy Patriot. It is really more political, so I seriously doubt any Republicans would particularly like it. Some of the harangues I find funny, but only because I dismiss them as rants. I don't try to find truth in them. Again, she's a history buff, so there are a lot of good nuggets.

Any way, the reason I bring this up is that Ms. Vowell, despite hovering somewhere to the left of witchcraft on the political scale, has earned a special place in my heart by, in the latter book, referring to two of my greatest (non-sexual) loves in the period of five minutes.

First, she referred to her friend Doug (I'm pretty sure it's Doug Petrie), who was a writer on Buffy the Vampire Slayer, and talked about how it was one of her all time favorite shows (as it is mine...and, OK...there might be a little sex involved in that one). A scant few minutes later, when talking about being a sports and art, she says:


Great athletes are no different from great artists. To me, Reggie Miller shooting a perfect free throw is as beautiful to look at as the bust of Nefertiti in Berlin's Egyptian museum.

Two for two.

Any way...if you like that kind of smart *** humor, sort of a low-key Daily Show type stuff, you might enjoy her writing.

Fair warning, she reads her own books, and she's got that nasally half-whiny voice that could drive people batty.

idioteque
02-05-2009, 05:11 PM
I am reading from Beirut to Jerusalem by Thomas Friedman.

I have read his later works and he as a person seems to be very aloof, but parts of this book are actually very funny and almost read out of something like Hunter S. Thompson.

DisplacedKnick
02-05-2009, 05:45 PM
I'm currently reading Language and History in the Early Germanic World (http://www.amazon.com/Language-History-Early-Germanic-World/dp/0521794234/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1233870116&sr=1-1) by D.H. Green. Interesting - I've read plenty of history backed by archaeology and plenty supported by text sources but this is the first I've read where historical developments are illustrated by changes in language.

Pig Nash
02-05-2009, 07:10 PM
Read a lot more recently:

The Road - Cormac McCarthy
Invisible Monsters and Rant - Chuck Pahlaniuk

count55
02-05-2009, 07:37 PM
I am reading from Beirut to Jerusalem by Thomas Friedman.

I have read his later works and he as a person seems to be very aloof, but parts of this book are actually very funny and almost read out of something like Hunter S. Thompson.

I really liked that book, but was less impressed with his later stuff. I'll read his columns relatively regularly. I can never quite get a bead on where exactly he stands, other than he's always a glass half full kind of guy.



Read a lot more recently:

The Road - Cormac McCarthy
Invisible Monsters and Rant - Chuck Pahlaniuk

I thought about reading The Road, but I worked so hard at No Country for Old Men that I just didn't have it in me. I read the book, then watched the movie, then listened to the book, twice, then watched the movie again, all the while talking to others who had done more or less the same.

I kept trying to understand the message, but I couldn't get anything more than "Everything is going to hell in a hand basket." I was on the verge of buying into it, but after talking to a number of people, and (oddly enough) reading Fareed Zakaria's The Post American World, I came to the conclusion that he was just morose, and the premise was faulty.

In other words, I thought both the book and the movie were extremely well made (written, acted, directed) horse ****.

Pig Nash
02-05-2009, 10:24 PM
The Road is actually less "woe is mankind" and more "well if mankind is ****ed, what then?" I liked it.

SoupIsGood
02-06-2009, 11:20 PM
Right now, reading Of The Farm - John Updike. RIP.

Count, I'm not sure McCarthy's books even have the sort of premise you're looking for. In fact, extracting that sort of 'slogan' from a work is going to make a lot of fiction seem trite.

count55
02-07-2009, 02:04 AM
Right now, reading Of The Farm - John Updike. RIP.

Count, I'm not sure McCarthy's books even have the sort of premise you're looking for. In fact, extracting that sort of 'slogan' from a work is going to make a lot of fiction seem trite.

I thought the book was trying to say something. I was trying to figure out what it was trying to say. I used a one liner as short hand. I wasn't looking for a slogan, I was looking for a meaning.

In effect, my point was that I wasn't particularly interested in reading McCarthy because, as talented as he was at crafting his book, I decided that what he had crafted really wasn't worth crafting.

BTW...a lot of fiction is trite.

SoupIsGood
02-07-2009, 02:42 PM
I thought the book was trying to say something. I was trying to figure out what it was trying to say. I used a one liner as short hand. I wasn't looking for a slogan, I was looking for a meaning.

In effect, my point was that I wasn't particularly interested in reading McCarthy because, as talented as he was at crafting his book, I decided that what he had crafted really wasn't worth crafting.

BTW...a lot of fiction is trite.

I didn't say it wasn't. But even this description here strikes me as a really bad way to read McCarthy's books. And also a good way to make a lot of fiction that isn't trite seem so.

idioteque
02-08-2009, 11:10 AM
I really liked that book, but was less impressed with his later stuff. I'll read his columns relatively regularly. I can never quite get a bead on where exactly he stands, other than he's always a glass half full kind of guy.

I agree.

What did you think of the Zakaria book? I started reading it at Borders once to see if it was worth buying and decided against it at about 30 pages. While the premise of the book was very interesting what he was saying somehow lacked director for me or it didn't seem well fleshed out, I don't know.

And, and fiction can be very trite, but it doesn't stop me from lovin' some John Grisham. :cool:

SoupIsGood
02-08-2009, 01:06 PM
I have a sweet spot for James Patterson. :p (His detectiveish stuff only.)

I splurged yesterday and bought the collected poems of Ginsberg, and, holy christ, this guy was good.

travmil
03-10-2009, 05:17 PM
I'm in the middle of When March Went Mad: The Game That Transformed Basketball. It's by SI writer Seth Davis and it's about the 1979 NCAA championship game between Magic and Larry and the stories and events that led each of them there. Great, great book so far, especially if you grew up in the 80's and watched the two of them play each other all the time like I did.

count55
03-10-2009, 10:41 PM
What did you think of the Zakaria book? I started reading it at Borders once to see if it was worth buying and decided against it at about 30 pages. While the premise of the book was very interesting what he was saying somehow lacked director for me or it didn't seem well fleshed out, I don't know.


I liked the Zakaria book (The Post American World) a great deal. It's been almost a year, but if I remember correctly, it's kind of a dry statistical start. However, it really, IMO took off later...of course, I listened to it (unabridged), and may have had a different take had I read it.



I splurged yesterday and bought the collected poems of Ginsberg, and, holy christ, this guy was good.

I bought that (or one of the collections) for my Nephew for Christmas a couple of years ago.

Since I'm in a car 15+ hours a week, a lot of audiobooks including:

History of Britain (3 Volume Set) by Simon Shama...Britain during the 1800's was very, very boring, and Britain's history is surprisingly vicious and ugly. (This was about 30 hours worth of books.)

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald...excellent

1984 by George Orwell...somehow, I'd managed to miss the class that required it's reading when I grew up. Again...excellent.

(Though I then tried to watch the movies for both of these, and...well...don't bother.)

1776 by David McCullough...very good...

Team of Rivals by Doris Kearns Goodwin...about Lincoln and his candidate. Really fascinating...it hits on the big events, but really focuses on things I've never really thought about much, like the Republican convention in 1860. It's a different lens for Lincoln.

After listening to the History of Britain, where virtually every key figure didn't just have human frailty, but had huge gaping flaws in their character, I had begun to think that there were no truly great men in history, but just scumbags who did great things.

That ain't the case with Lincoln. Perfect? No. Great? You Betcha.

Currently listening to: The War That Made America: A Short History of the French and Indian War by Fred Anderson

This, plus 1776, seems to indicate that George Washington spent a good amount of his early career and early Revolutionary War as kind of a **** up.

I started to listen to: Caesar's Legion: The Epic Saga of Julius Caesar's Elite Tenth Legion and the Armies of Rome by Stephen Dando-Collins, but I put it aside.

SycamoreKen
03-10-2009, 11:45 PM
I'm just about finished with Quiet Strength by Tony Dungy. A great read.

SoupIsGood
03-11-2009, 12:50 AM
Count, that's really cool. I tried listening to audiobooks in the car for a little while, but I could never get used to it. I go like retarded if I don't have those words on print to look at, for some reason. I just can't keep my mind w/in the narrative (or argument, or whatever it may be...).

count55
03-11-2009, 10:33 AM
Count, that's really cool. I tried listening to audiobooks in the car for a little while, but I could never get used to it. I go like retarded if I don't have those words on print to look at, for some reason. I just can't keep my mind w/in the narrative (or argument, or whatever it may be...).

It does require attention, and I do find myself "rewinding" from time-to-time. In the car, it's a nice balance where I can pay the proper attention to both driving and listening. I have less success at home or elsewhere. I get distracted by other things.

All things being equal, I love the tactile experience of a book, but audiobooks do have their advantages. For example, I'm less likely to give up entirely on an audiobook. I'm not a particularly fast reader, so I'm more likely to put one down and not pick it up. Also, the fact that I have a 100-mile one way trip to work gives enough time to get large sections and engage. My previous 15-minute drive would've largely been a waste of time.

SoupIsGood
03-11-2009, 11:37 AM
You know, after I posted that last night I went and tried one of the free, amateur audiobooks at librivox, and it was pretty interesting! I paired it w/ an actual right-there-in-my-hands reading. I've had concentration problems lately, so I think I might try that for a while. (More and more I feel like I'm reading "at" a book, whereas hearing someone's voice while reading make me feel a little bit more of that "with.") Plus it helps me to slow down and really listen to the sounds of each word, which is nice--especially with poetry. Oh man, there are a few stellar readers of poetry on that site. Just makes you melt.

Knucklehead Warrior
03-11-2009, 02:59 PM
I'm in the middle of When March Went Mad: The Game That Transformed Basketball. It's by SI writer Seth Davis and it's about the 1979 NCAA championship game between Magic and Larry and the stories and events that led each of them there. Great, great book so far, especially if you grew up in the 80's and watched the two of them play each other all the time like I did.

As an aside, that's the same year IU and Purdue played the NIT championship game. 3 Big Ten schools in those finals and 3 Indiana schools.

Gyron
03-14-2009, 10:00 AM
I just got done reading Robert Schimmel's Book, "Cancer on $5 a day, Chemo not included". Actually a great read. He makes cancer as funny as it can be and interesting how humor led him through near death with Chemo.

When he talks about his son dying from brain cancer I wanted to cry. When he is near death towards the end of the chemo I had to fight back a few tears....

Great read, I recommend.

Next up: Tony Dungy's new Book, "Uncommon". I;'m only one chapter in, but can already see it was written for teenagers....Guess I should have read the description before I picked it up. Oh well, I'll finish it, but maybe not at the pace I did Robert's book. I finished that book in less than 10 days.

idioteque
03-14-2009, 12:56 PM
I am trying to get my hands on a copy of "Getting Open" which is about Bill Garrett, the first black basketball player Big 10. He played for Shelbyville when they won the state title in 1946 I believe.

count55
03-14-2009, 08:47 PM
I am trying to get my hands on a copy of "Getting Open" which is about Bill Garrett, the first black basketball player Big 10. He played for Shelbyville when they won the state title in 1946 I believe.

http://www.amazon.com/Getting-Open-Garrett-Integration-Basketball/dp/0253220467/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1237077990&sr=8-1

Seems to be a cheap price

count55
04-05-2009, 10:08 PM
Paris 1919: Six Months That Changed the World - Not bad...there have been a lot of pinheads who were world leaders. It seemed very disjointed, but I think I accidentally listened to it out of order (I'm having some issues with the way my iPod organizes some of these books.)

A Savage War of Peace by Alistair Horne...fantastic book...absolutely fantastic.

(I would actually love to find a book about Viet Nam that is like this. It is a comprehensive, two-sided look at the Algerian War of Independence from France, 1954-1962, covering the action and the political and geopolitical history and ramifications.)

Shade
04-05-2009, 10:10 PM
The new Dresden Files book comes out tomorrow! :yay:

count55
04-14-2009, 11:04 PM
Peace Kills: America's Fun New Imperialism PJ O'Rourke

Not as good as Holidays in Hell, but enjoyable.

The Future of Freedom: Illiberal Democracy at Home and Abroad Fareed Zakaria

Very Interesting...I've liked both this and The Post American World.

Last of the Mohicans James Fennimore Cooper...it was OK

Rebecca by Daphne DuMaurier...excellent

I have the following four items lined up to listen to in my car:

Guns, Germs, and Steel Jared Diamond

The Quiet American Graham Greene

Waiting for Godot Beckett

Breakfast of Champions Kurt Vonnegut

(Oh, I'm also reading Dean Oliver's Basketball on Paper, but more as a textbook/reference book than an actual read...God, I hope my posts don't read like this.)

I'm starting to get a jonesin' for the old Chip Hilton books...might have to read the ones I have again.

obnoxiousmodesty
04-15-2009, 12:19 AM
Just finished Pride and Prejudice. I enjoyed it immensely, more so than my wife who recommended it.

Now I'm reading The Printer's Trial by Gail Jarrow, a short but very interesting book focusing on the battle for freedom of the press in New York in the 1730s.

idioteque
04-15-2009, 01:05 PM
A Peace to End All Peace, David Fromkin

Not what I expected but I really liked it. This book is about the construction of the Middle East after the fall of the Ottoman Empire by the British and French. It is amazing how little the West has known about the Middle East until quite recently.

The Rastafarians, Leonard E. Barrett

It was okay but the author used way too many excerpts from other works for my liking. Boring in some parts and interesting in others. Mrs. DC is Jamaican and I am trying to learn more about the island's history and culture.

Now working on:

The Arab Center: The Promise for Moderation, Marwan Muasher

I have actually met the author, who is a Jordanian diplomat, and he is a great guy. His book is incredibly interesting because it offers a lot of information on the Arab-Israeli conflict post Oslo, which is still hard to find even though that was quite long ago now. It is from the Jordanian perspective mostly, and reads quite easily. The author points out that few Arab diplomats have written memoirs in English, so it offers something other than the outside perspective that most Americans get.

On my list: Orientalism, Edward Said and Arabists: Romance of an American Elite by Robert Kaplan. Also interested in Liberal Fascism by Jonah Goldberg even though it is obviously airplane-type reading.

SoupIsGood
04-15-2009, 04:15 PM
The Recognitions, Gaddis.

Rereading Infinite Jest in spurts.

count55
04-15-2009, 04:24 PM
A Peace to End All Peace, David Fromkin

Not what I expected but I really liked it. This book is about the construction of the Middle East after the fall of the Ottoman Empire by the British and French. It is amazing how little the West has known about the Middle East until quite recently.


On my list: Orientalism, Edward Said and Arabists: Romance of an American Elite by Robert Kaplan. Also interested in Liberal Fascism by Jonah Goldberg even though it is obviously airplane-type reading.

Read Paris 1919. It gives an interesting view into the people like Clemencau, Wilson, and Lloyd-George. The West was ignorant, to be sure, but also very patronizing. In this, and other books, they discuss the "Orientalists" from England, so I'm wonder if that's what the Said book is.

Jonah Goldberg has always struck me as a complete pinhead.

idioteque
04-15-2009, 10:20 PM
Read Paris 1919. It gives an interesting view into the people like Clemencau, Wilson, and Lloyd-George. The West was ignorant, to be sure, but also very patronizing. In this, and other books, they discuss the "Orientalists" from England, so I'm wonder if that's what the Said book is.

Jonah Goldberg has always struck me as a complete pinhead.

Said's basic premise, I think, is that many (especially Western) scholars of the East are "Orientalists" because they view the people, culture, and customs of the East in an objectifying manner. But I'm not really sure because I haven't read it yet.

Everyone tells me Paris 1919 is good, I can't believe I haven't gotten to it yet but I am going to try to this year. My only perceptions of Clemencau, Wilson, and Lloyd-George are derived from their policies in the East and I would like to be able to expand that. I think I will forever be convinced that Asquith was a total dolt.

As for Goldberg, I also think he is a pinhead, but relative to my worldview without getting overtly political here, I think he is telling half of the story. I am sure you can infer what I am thinking.

Unfortunately soon I won't be able to read quite as much as I am starting Arabic tutoring back up!

count55
04-15-2009, 11:08 PM
Said's basic premise, I think, is that many (especially Western) scholars of the East are "Orientalists" because they view the people, culture, and customs of the East in an objectifying manner. But I'm not really sure because I haven't read it yet.

Everyone tells me Paris 1919 is good, I can't believe I haven't gotten to it yet but I am going to try to this year. My only perceptions of Clemencau, Wilson, and Lloyd-George are derived from their policies in the East and I would like to be able to expand that. I think I will forever be convinced that Asquith was a total dolt.

As for Goldberg, I also think he is a pinhead, but relative to my worldview without getting overtly political here, I think he is telling half of the story. I am sure you can infer what I am thinking.

Unfortunately soon I won't be able to read quite as much as I am starting Arabic tutoring back up!

I liked Paris 1919, but it did kind of grind on me. I don't think it was because of the writing, though. I think it was because it so relentlessly hammered home how, in some very important ways, those three guys (W, C, L-G) were so horribly oblivious, jingoistic, and arrogant. Honestly, the only American Historical figures I've come away liking less than Wilson were McArthur and McClellan.

It's a little on a tangent, but I thought Savage War of Peace was perhaps the best, most comprehensive historical book I've ever read. It is a fantastic and unique lens on the Western-Arab/Muslim relationship. It also shows that obscene brutality, violence, and wanton murder of innocents wasn't invented by Islamist terrorists. (Some of the **** the pied noir and the OAS did was blood curdling and blinding in its stupidity and senselessness.) If you don't get a chance to read it, watch "The Battle of Algiers." It was made in 66 or 67, and Saadi Yucef (one of the FLN leaders) more or less plays himself. It was produced by Yucef, and made by an Italian director with the full endorsement of the the Algerian government, but it's stunningly evenhanded. It even basically portrays the French Para Colonel as one of the heroes of the piece.

Also, you asked, but I'd suggest reading both Zakaria books. I really enjoyed them. The subject matter can be dry, but I just love the way he looks at things.


On another topic, The Coldest Winter by David Halberstam is a fantastic book. I read it last winter. It's about the first winter of the Korean War, and that's a subject I knew very little about.

Read "Waiting for Godot" today...ummmm....OK.

Just started Breakfast of Champions....(farting and tap dancing....giggle, giggle, snort.)

idioteque
04-16-2009, 11:27 AM
If anyone ever needs a short, but well written history on the Russian Revolution, The Russian Revolution by Alan Moorehead is great. Scholarly but really easy to read, almost like reading fiction really. Or if you ever wanted to get into historical nonfiction it would be a nice place to start.

Count I think eventually I am going to have to get back into these Zakaria books, I have been reading the free pages on Amazon today and they are worth another shot.

Since86
04-16-2009, 12:55 PM
Finished Clapton, written by the man himself, a few weeks ago.

Obviously, you can tell he's not much of a writer, but I really enjoyed the book. It's amazing about how a person can come full circle the way he did. From all the booze and the massive drugs to the sober person he is today.

sweabs
04-26-2009, 09:04 PM
A Long Long Way by Sebastian Barry

Brought me to tears. Would highly recommend for anyone interested in WWI. A deeply saddening and terrifying story that is written in a way that makes things all too real.

sweabs
05-03-2009, 05:34 PM
Can I Keep My Jersey by Paul Shirley

You might know him as the white guy who sat at the end of the bench for the 2003 Phoenix Suns, or perhaps you've read some of his stuff on espn.com.

Anyway, the book definitely gives the reader (in my case) a new-found respect for these players who are fighting to earn a 10-day contract. Shirley is hilarious and enlightens us with some pretty good stories. He doesn't even hold back with names in many cases which appealed to me. Great read...I'd recommend to any basketball fan.

Shade
05-04-2009, 01:26 PM
Just finished Turn Coat, the 11th novel of The Dresden Files, a few days ago. Anyone who is not reading this series is really missing out.

ABADays
05-04-2009, 05:10 PM
Just finished Big Russ and Me by Tim Russert. If every father had the admiration Tim had for his dad there would be a lot of good days.

Now ready to attack Tony Dungy's UnCommon.

sweabs
06-01-2009, 06:58 PM
a

MyFavMartin
06-06-2009, 11:36 PM
Just finished Turn Coat, the 11th novel of The Dresden Files, a few days ago. Anyone who is not reading this series is really missing out.

Can you describe the book/series?

MyFavMartin
06-06-2009, 11:43 PM
I
I also just read a book about the air war in the Pacific during WW2. VERY interesting.



Just finished Flyboys by James Bradley. Was it this one?

Very good book. Discusses American Pilot POWs of WWII and the Pacific campaign.

Very enlightening and informative.

Did you know more people died from the samarai sword in WWII than the atomic bomb?

kester99
06-07-2009, 12:28 AM
The Reality Dysfunction by Peter Hamilton....very good space opera sci-fi. First of a trilogy, all of which are about 1100 pages. Doesn't drag at all, or get wordy just to be wordy.

Kind of a cross between Heinlein and Poul Anderson...nicely put together.

SoupIsGood
06-07-2009, 12:36 PM
Just finished The Brothers Karamazov, moving on to Expelled From Eden.

sweabs
06-19-2009, 11:06 PM
a

Mourning
06-22-2009, 01:40 AM
Just finished The Brothers Karamazov

Reading that one myself at the moment for somewhile now... Good book, but the way of telling the story is pretty LONG...

Trophy
06-22-2009, 01:58 AM
Anyone ever read The Five People You Meet in Heaven by Mitch Albom?

If so, please don't tell me the ending. Thanks.

rexnom
06-22-2009, 02:13 AM
Currently reading The Tragedy of Great Power Politics by John Mearsheimer...interesting and thought-out arguments, though I disagree with a lot of the basic premises in it.

idioteque
06-22-2009, 12:29 PM
Rexnom I have thought about reading that book as well, as it pretty much contradicts most of the things I believe about IR.

Currently reading The Future of Freedom by Zakaria, which is alright but I've come to the conclusion after going through two Zakaria books that he does not really write for people who follow international politics closely.

I want to read The Media Relations Department of Hizbollah Wishes You a Happy Birthday, Sachs' new one Common Wealth, and Jared Diamond's Collapse. Work has made me really tired lately and I am studying for the GRE (my math is hilariously horrible), so I haven't been able to read as much as I want.

rexnom
06-22-2009, 03:54 PM
Rexnom I have thought about reading that book as well, as it pretty much contradicts most of the things I believe about IR.

Currently reading The Future of Freedom by Zakaria, which is alright but I've come to the conclusion after going through two Zakaria books that he does not really write for people who follow international politics closely.

I want to read The Media Relations Department of Hizbollah Wishes You a Happy Birthday, Sachs' new one Common Wealth, and Jared Diamond's Collapse. Work has made me really tired lately and I am studying for the GRE (my math is hilariously horrible), so I haven't been able to read as much as I want.
Mearsheimer and Zakaria are fairly closely aligned in their IR-thinking. They're both realist school though Mearsheimer has developed his own branch that's at the same time unique and well-argued. And I think you're dead on about Zakaria - unless you read him in Foreign Affairs or something, he's definitely "pop international affairs," which is just fine of course.

Good luck on the GRE. Make vocab cards and just keep doing math problems over and over again - the same basic problems come up on the test. Make sure you know the basic math behind these problems too (for example, I relearned long division, which I had basically forgotten - who knew?! haha).

idioteque
07-08-2009, 10:03 AM
It is probably time to dutifully bump this thread.

Currently reading (and almost done with) Guests of the Ayatollah by Mark Bowden. Holy crap it is good. It is a 650 page book, I bought it on Friday, and I am on page 500. Enough said.

I have a long list of things I want to read in the next few months: some Hemingway which I think will be nice to read while I'm visiting family in Florida, Zorba the Greek Nikos Kazantzakis which has intrigued me for a long time, and probably in the future I want to read some hard IR theory. I am looking at After Hegemony by Keohane. Rexnom, what is a good counterpoint to Tragedy of Great Power Politics? Interestingly I was reading one of the Foreignpolicy.com blogs and one of the bloggers listed that book as the best IR book of the 2000's.

SoupIsGood
07-08-2009, 12:24 PM
Vollmann's The Royal Family.


Pretty sweet. Can't wait for Imperial - still trying to decide if I should fork over the $ and pre-order it or not.....

rexnom
07-08-2009, 03:43 PM
It is probably time to dutifully bump this thread.

Currently reading (and almost done with) Guests of the Ayatollah by Mark Bowden. Holy crap it is good. It is a 650 page book, I bought it on Friday, and I am on page 500. Enough said.

I have a long list of things I want to read in the next few months: some Hemingway which I think will be nice to read while I'm visiting family in Florida, Zorba the Greek Nikos Kazantzakis which has intrigued me for a long time, and probably in the future I want to read some hard IR theory. I am looking at After Hegemony by Keohane. Rexnom, what is a good counterpoint to Tragedy of Great Power Politics? Interestingly I was reading one of the Foreignpolicy.com blogs and one of the bloggers listed that book as the best IR book of the 2000's.
There's three basic schools of realism - Mearsheimer's offensive realism, Kenneth Waltz's "defensive" or systemic/neorealism (see Theory of International Politics), and Hans Morgenthau's "human nature"/classical realism (see Politics Among Nations). Those aren't really counterpoints but just other sides of the same coin.

Some good counterpoints are Alexander Wendt's Social Theory of International Politics, which is a foundational work on constructivist IR theory - a real counterpoint to realism.

There's lots of good liberal theory out there. Liberal theory also has three strands - democratic peace theory (see Charles Lipson's Reliable Partners), institutionalism and economic interdependence (Keohane here is excellent).

None of them are as readable as Mearsheimer, unfortunately, but that should get you through the rest of the summer at least.

Let me know how you like Zorba the Greek. Needless to say, my family's been bugging me to read it for as long as I've been alive.

idioteque
07-08-2009, 05:26 PM
There's three basic schools of realism - Mearsheimer's offensive realism, Kenneth Waltz's "defensive" or systemic/neorealism (see Theory of International Politics), and Hans Morgenthau's "human nature"/classical realism (see Politics Among Nations). Those aren't really counterpoints but just other sides of the same coin.

Some good counterpoints are Alexander Wendt's Social Theory of International Politics, which is a foundational work on constructivist IR theory - a real counterpoint to realism.

There's lots of good liberal theory out there. Liberal theory also has three strands - democratic peace theory (see Charles Lipson's Reliable Partners), institutionalism and economic interdependence (Keohane here is excellent).

None of them are as readable as Mearsheimer, unfortunately, but that should get you through the rest of the summer at least.

Let me know how you like Zorba the Greek. Needless to say, my family's been bugging me to read it for as long as I've been alive.

Thanks for the primer. I think I dozed off during a good portion of Maurice East's International Affairs intro course at GW, don't know if you had him, he only taught the course for one year. I hated theory during school and am just now developing a real interest in it. I think I am actually going to print out your reply.

I'll let you know how Zorba the Greek is. I'm trying to read more fiction before Grad School.

SoupIsGood
11-21-2009, 11:20 PM
Recently read We Were the Mulvaneys by Joyce Carol Oates, Notes from Underground by FMD, Changing My Mind by Zadie Smith, and Ariel by Plath. The Oates book was pretty good, though by no means great. The Smith book was a mixed bag. FMD was stellar/demented, as always—though, I read it while enduring the flu, and might not have absorbed it very well. Still fun. About half the Plath poems were awesome (and by that I mean really, really awesome—the kind of poems I'll have still stuck in my mind years from now), while the others I could kind of take or leave.

Trying to decide what to move on to... kind of in the mood for some nonfiction.

SoupIsGood
12-09-2009, 10:45 AM
The Complete Poems of Emily Dickinson.

By far the best book I've read in a long time. Dickinson was a bona fide 100% badass. If you haven't read most of her poems, you need to go out and buy this book and read them all right now—and I mean right now. They're that good. Insanely good. Holy cow.

count55
12-09-2009, 11:21 AM
Oil! by Upton Sinclair - The book upon which "There Will Be Blood" was (very loosely) based.

The Quiet American by Graham Greene - Very good book, and they did a very good adaptation of it with Michael Caine and Brendan Frazier (sp?).

Currently reading:

The Art of a Beautiful Game by Chris Ballard - Really great NBA book that just came out. Basically spends a chapter on each of several different players/specialists. Great stuff.

SoupIsGood
12-28-2009, 10:59 AM
Lolita - Nabokov

Absolutely wicked. Nabokov is such an effing trickster—this was just a delightful experience. I was grinning practically the entire time I read this. I sense a Nabokov Phase coming on. I've already got Pale Fire and Ada here next to me. I can't wait for Shade vs. Kinbote.

count55
01-20-2010, 11:06 PM
Got a Sony Reader for my Birthday...pretty cool.

Just getting used to it...got some old Tom Corbett Space Cadet books.

sweabs
01-21-2010, 11:34 PM
a

LoneGranger33
01-21-2010, 11:46 PM
Just finished a book I've been meaning to read for a while - The Shock Doctrine - whose basic premise is unfortunately on display once again.

I want to switch to a lighter subject matter for my next read, and I'm long overdue for reading a basketball book: should it be Halberstam (rcarey) or Ballard (count55)? I see they've both been reviewed positively, and I'm just the worst at making decisions.

sweabs
01-22-2010, 01:36 AM
Shock Doctrine eh? How did you like it? I have read select chapters from No Logo and am thinking of tackling the book sometime in the near future...after I get through about 4 others sitting on the shelf.

count55
01-22-2010, 09:32 AM
The Breaks of the Game - by David Halberstam

As far as leisure reading goes, I enjoy reading basketball stories. This is by far, the best basketball book I have ever read. It's more than basketball...that's probably what makes it so good.

Halberstam is an amazing writer. He worked alongside the Trailblazers throughout the late 70s chronicling the Walton era - and really just captures the essence of those teams...situated within that point in time in history. It is masterful writing - you come away with a sense of this being an ethnographic study. Not only does Halberstam depict the stuff that was happening on the outside, but he gives you a sense for how the players, coaches, management, fans, and every other person involved was feeling. Beautiful stuff. It is the historical context, in my opinion, which made this book all the more fascinating. There are also some very interesting themes of power within the book.

But like I said, the research that went into this (i.e. the interviews and situating himself within the culture 24/7) is unbelievable - the "character development" is so good that you almost feel as though you know each player or coach on a deep, personal level. Bill Walton's story is such a sad one indeed...Billy Ray Bates provides this innocence at a time that just seems so out-of-place...Maurice Lucas is this man that represents so much more than the physical beast that he was on the court.

I could go on about this book - but I'll just spare everyone by saying that it is a must-read for any basketball fan (and especially those who love American history & basketball history).

The stuff on Kermit Washington was excellent, as well. I think the first time I read it was in high school, but it's possible that I got it after Jack Ramsay was hired to coach the Pacers.

I re-read it again recently, and it's stunning how different the league is.

If you liked Halberstam's stuff, his book on the Korean War - The Coldest Winter - is fantastic.

count55
01-22-2010, 09:33 AM
Just finished a book I've been meaning to read for a while - The Shock Doctrine - whose basic premise is unfortunately on display once again.

I want to switch to a lighter subject matter for my next read, and I'm long overdue for reading a basketball book: should it be Halberstam (rcarey) or Ballard (count55)? I see they've both been reviewed positively, and I'm just the worst at making decisions.

Ballard's book is excellent, but I think I probably liked Halberstam's better.

Read both.

sweabs
01-22-2010, 11:15 AM
a

vapacersfan
01-22-2010, 02:25 PM
Have any of you read W.E.B. Griffin?

I have to do a project on technology (hard cover vs audio books) and am considering listening to the audio book for "The honor of spies"

PaceBalls
01-22-2010, 06:19 PM
Just finished Toll the Hounds (book 9 Malazan series) by Steven Erikson, and god... it was fantastic. I think these books are some of the best fiction I've read. Book 10, Dust of Dreams, should arrive from Amazon on Monday :)

Non fiction - The Greatest Show on Earth - the evidence for evolution by Richard Dawkins was pretty good if you are into that sort of thing.

BigRik
01-28-2010, 02:19 PM
Got a Sony Reader for my Birthday...pretty cool.

Just getting used to it...got some old Tom Corbett Space Cadet books.

How do you like the Sony Reader? I wish I would have checked on this thread earlier, since I just orderred a Kindle.

count55
01-28-2010, 08:00 PM
How do you like the Sony Reader? I wish I would have checked on this thread earlier, since I just orderred a Kindle.

I like it pretty well. I just have the Pocket reader, so it doesn't have a lot of bells & whistles, but it's nice, since I'm tough on books.

I know several people who have Kindles, and they love them. My wife bought me the pocket reader for a couple of reasons: I work for Sony, and it was the cheapest (around 180) and she wasn't sure if I'd use it.

I couldn't tell you whether one is markedly better than the other.

SoupIsGood
01-28-2010, 08:23 PM
JD Salinger died. Age 91.

count55
02-01-2010, 08:29 PM
Hunt for Red October Tom Clancy for the umpteenth time

Without Remorse Tom Clancy for the second time

Clear and Present Danger Tom Clancy for third or fourth time

Animal Farm George Orwell for the first time

Still reading the Tom Corbett stuff, and I'm starting Catch 22 in the morning.

Wu-Gambino
02-02-2010, 08:45 PM
Finished Freakonomics in one sitting. It was absolutely fascinating, couldn't but it down.

Currently reading the Great Gatsby. I'm trying to get into the classics; I enjoy the book so far.

sweabs
02-16-2010, 12:01 AM
a

Thesterovic
02-16-2010, 12:17 AM
Larry Bird Earvin Magic Johnson by Jackie McMullan is really a very good book, and it talks about everything from them growing up to Larry Bird on trading away our thugs after the brawl. I recommend it to people who like things that are awesome.

Gyron
02-16-2010, 10:26 PM
http://www.amazon.com/Five-Dysfunctions-Team-Leadership-Lencioni/dp/0787960756

Had to read this for a team building thing they are doing at work. Not a bad book, some decent ideas as well. Easy read. Can knock it out in 3-4 hours total. It also tells the theory in the form of a fictional story, which makes it so much easier to read and helps get the ideas across.

The five dysfunctions of a team.

SoupIsGood
02-25-2010, 12:23 PM
Self-Portrait in a Convex Mirror, Ashbery

Stryder
02-25-2010, 01:30 PM
http://www.amazon.com/Five-Dysfunctions-Team-Leadership-Lencioni/dp/0787960756

Had to read this for a team building thing they are doing at work. Not a bad book, some decent ideas as well. Easy read. Can knock it out in 3-4 hours total. It also tells the theory in the form of a fictional story, which makes it so much easier to read and helps get the ideas across.

The five dysfunctions of a team.

Yes, I've read that and other things from Lencioni for leadership/team building exercises at work.

count55
02-25-2010, 11:24 PM
Henderson the Rain King by Saul Bellow

Sookie
02-25-2010, 11:32 PM
Lolita

It's for a women's studies class. Kind of disturbing.

SoupIsGood
02-25-2010, 11:39 PM
Lolita is effing great. One of my favorite novels.

count55
03-03-2010, 06:36 PM
Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets of Baltimore by David Simon.

All kinds of good, particularly if you like The Wire.

count55
03-09-2010, 09:47 AM
Shutter Island by Dennis Lehane

Haven't seen the movie, but the book was pretty good. Not groundbreaking, but entertaining.

This is the guy who also wrote Mystic River.

count55
03-15-2010, 09:23 PM
Darkly Dreaming Dexter

Dearly Devoted Dexter

by Jeff Lindsay

These are the books on which the TV Series Dexter is based. I'm currently in the middle of the third one -Dexter in the Dark/

They're really enjoyable, and somewhat more humorous than the series. The first one was excellent, and the second was very good, but I thought the ending was just a little cheap.

Certainly not a landmark of literature, but very enjoyable.

Edit: The ending of Dexter in the Dark was a little cheap, too.

I'm of the opinion that there are two aspects to any kind of narrative (Book, Movie, TV Show) - the story and the storytelling.

These books are examples of great storytelling with kinda weak, formulaic stories.

vapacersfan
03-15-2010, 09:51 PM
Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets of Baltimore by David Simon.

All kinds of good, particularly if you like The Wire.

I loved the wire. I may have to check this book out.

idioteque
03-15-2010, 10:20 PM
The Israeli-Palestinian Conflict by Mark Tessler.

Has been kind of slow going but always good to get another perspective. I'm trying to brush up on my history of the conflict and Lebanon history as well.

Pig Nash
08-12-2010, 01:22 AM
It's a crime this thread was so far down:

I'm reading Unexectedly, Milo by Matthew Dicks.

It's quite good, you should check it out, as well as his first book Something Missing.

ilive4sports
08-12-2010, 01:48 AM
Scar Tissue - the biography of Anthony Kiedis, singer for the Red Hot Chili Peppers if you didnt know.

The guy has lead an incredible life and it is amazing he is alive. He has abused drugs from such an early age (is sober now) and just did some really stupid things that should have gotten him killed, but didnt. I thought it was a great book. Im a huge RHCP fan and seeing into his life and into the band was awesome.

And I must say that I am so happy to post in this thread that I read a book! I've fallen off on reading cause I usually just read what I have to for college. It's nice to choose a book for once. I feel like Jim Gaffigan in his sketch about reading books. "how you doing Jim? I READ A BOOK!"

count55
08-12-2010, 01:30 PM
Sex, Drugs and Cocoa Puffs

Killing Yourself to Live, 85% of a True Story

Eating the Dinosaur

All by Chuck Klosterman - I really, really enjoyed them, but I could see them not being everyone's cup of tea. Mostly pop culture stuff - music, movies, Kobain/Koresh, some great sports essays.

MagicRat
08-12-2010, 01:56 PM
I'm about halfway through Washington's Crossing (http://www.amazon.com/Washingtons-Crossing-Pivotal-Moments-American/dp/019518159X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1281635654&sr=8-1). Good stuff.

BRushWithDeath
08-12-2010, 02:50 PM
Hunt for Red October Tom Clancy for the umpteenth time

Without Remorse Tom Clancy for the second time

Clear and Present Danger Tom Clancy for third or fourth time

Animal Farm George Orwell for the first time

Still reading the Tom Corbett stuff, and I'm starting Catch 22 in the morning.

I'm a Tom Clancy fan as well. If you haven't read Executive Decision and The Bear and the Dragon I'd recommend them. They're both pretty long compared to Clear and Present Danger but I enjoyed them. I think some bad guys got some ideas from Executive Decision. Just be sure to tackle them in order.

Read Animal Farm in high school. Loved it. A true classic.

I've also read the entire Dexter series. It is my favorite show on television so I picked up the books. I thought the first one was fantastic as the first season of the show was a near direct replica of the book. The other books have nothing to do with the show. They aren't big thinkers but they're easy beach or plane reading.

ilive4sports
08-12-2010, 02:59 PM
Sex, Drugs and Cocoa Puffs

Killing Yourself to Live, 85% of a True Story

Eating the Dinosaur

All by Chuck Klosterman - I really, really enjoyed them, but I could see them not being everyone's cup of tea. Mostly pop culture stuff - music, movies, Kobain/Koresh, some great sports essays.

My first college English professor read us an excerpt from Sex, Drugs, and Cocoa Puffs, the part where he is complaining about how this girl wants to go see Chris Martin sing about a stupid color. I bought the book shortly after and really enjoyed it. I need to check out more of his stuff.

BRushWithDeath
08-12-2010, 03:20 PM
I've started reading up a little bit on the war in Afghanistan in the last couple weeks.

The Only Thing Worth Dying For by Eric Blehm

Tells the story of some of the first special forces who landed in Afghanistan in the earliest stages of the war. Hamid Karzai is a central figure as the book is about the Green Berets who helped bring him to power.

Lone Survivor by Marcus Luttrell

Written by a Navy SEAL, it focuses a lot on the process of becoming a SEAL which I found greatly interesting. While not mentioned in the book due to it being written before it was awarded, Luttrell's best friend and SEAL team leader was named a Medal of Honor recipient. Only two M.O.H.'s have been awarded in the war in Afghanistan.

Just started War by Sebastian Junger

I haven't read much of it yet but Junger (best known for The Perfect Storm is a fantastic author. The book was written about Junger's trip to Afghanistan to film a documentary. I saw the movie, "Restrepo" last week at the Keystone Art Theater. It's only playing in limited cinemas but I think it is an important film. If it's playing close to you, go see it. It shows exactly what our troops are going through day in and day out over there.

I'd recommend both books. I probably enjoyed Lone Survivor slightly more than The Only Thing Worth Dying For but I'm glad I read both.

Stryder
08-12-2010, 09:22 PM
My first college English professor read us an excerpt from Sex, Drugs, and Cocoa Puffs, the part where he is complaining about how this girl wants to go see Chris Martin sing about a stupid color. I bought the book shortly after and really enjoyed it. I need to check out more of his stuff.


I love Klostermann's books.

Stryder
08-12-2010, 09:23 PM
Just finished Dr. Kary Mullis's Dancing Naked in the Mind Field. Love that book. Reread it every year or so.

Currently reading McCarthy's The Road.

count55
08-12-2010, 11:10 PM
I'm a Tom Clancy fan as well. If you haven't read Executive Decision and The Bear and the Dragon I'd recommend them. They're both pretty long compared to Clear and Present Danger but I enjoyed them. I think some bad guys got some ideas from Executive Decision. Just be sure to tackle them in order.



Yeah, I've read all of the Clancy stuff up to probably Bear & Dragon. Didn't read Red Rabbit or the other stuff.

count55
08-12-2010, 11:11 PM
I love Klostermann's books.

If you like Klosterman, then get the two part podcast of the BS Report from 8/2. Great convo between Simmons and Klosterman about LeBron.