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yoadknux
07-13-2012, 07:34 PM
Hey guys.

Not sure if this is is thread worthy, but there's something that interested me.
I've recently started seeing people write 'should of .....' 'would of .....' and stuff like that. Now, the form I know is 'should have', 'would have' etc. When someone uses "of" instead of "have", does it have the same meaning? Is it a slang?
English isn't my first/native language and I wondered about this thing.

travmil
07-13-2012, 07:49 PM
Proper is "should have" not "should of". My guess is it came about because you hear many people shorten "should have" into a contraction like "should've". That's not really a word, I would say that qualifies as slang. But the pronunciation of the "should've" sounds like "should of" and has entered into common usage that way. It's definitely not the Queen's English.

imawhat
07-14-2012, 02:39 AM
It's just poor English.

In Indiana, accents make should've sound like should of, and if that's how you grew up hearing it, then it's easy to make the error of spelling it should of.

Frostwolf
07-14-2012, 07:35 AM
it's grammatically incorrect. the contraction of "should have" into "should've" makes it sound like "should of" when spoken. same applies for "would've."

cdash
07-14-2012, 10:18 AM
It means they had incredibly poor 3rd grade English teachers.

But yeah, it's very annoying to see that all the time. It is one of my pet peeves and I have pointed it out to numerous people on numerous occasions on here.

Hicks
07-14-2012, 01:25 PM
Hey guys.

Not sure if this is is thread worthy, but there's something that interested me.
I've recently started seeing people write 'should of .....' 'would of .....' and stuff like that. Now, the form I know is 'should have', 'would have' etc. When someone uses "of" instead of "have", does it have the same meaning? Is it a slang?
English isn't my first/native language and I wondered about this thing.

It's just poor Enlglish. 'Should have' is the correct way to say it. Can be contracted as 'should've'.

yoadknux
07-14-2012, 01:36 PM
Glad you guys cleared that out for me. Thanks!

ilive4sports
07-14-2012, 02:04 PM
It means they had incredibly poor 3rd grade English teachers.

But yeah, it's very annoying to see that all the time. It is one of my pet peeves and I have pointed it out to numerous people on numerous occasions on here.
maybe if we common folk could of went to your fancy school we would of known better :D

but yeah its should have.

cdash
07-14-2012, 05:39 PM
maybe if we common folk could of went to your fancy school we would of known better :D

but yeah its should have.

Oh lordy my elementary school was far from fancy. I just paid attention.

graphic-er
07-17-2012, 03:28 PM
Now that's over with.....why is it that the British say Tuesday as "Chuesday" Are Americans saying it wrong? How about the differences in their pronunciation of the words Aluminum and Esophagus
Brits- ALU-minium & EESO-phagus

ilive4sports
07-17-2012, 05:02 PM
Brits are weird. they also pronounce puma as pewma.

travmil
07-17-2012, 07:46 PM
I got (ahem, have) a better question. Why do barely 50% of high school students pass English but 100% of people turn into Grammar Nazi's on the internet?

Not accusing the OP of being a grammar nazi, just making an observation.

cdash
07-17-2012, 08:28 PM
I got (ahem, have) a better question. Why do barely 50% of high school students pass English but 100% of people turn into Grammar Nazi's on the internet?

Not accusing the OP of being a grammar nazi, just making an observation.

Because the 50% that did pass comprises 90% of the internet.