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View Full Version : Dont pump gas on April 15th



LetsTalkPacers
03-27-2012, 10:53 PM
damn you guys can be a bunch of pretentious asses sometimes. i was just trying to do something i thought was nice. damn!

jeffg-body
03-27-2012, 11:34 PM
I am with you on this and will make sure to remember.

Unclebuck
03-28-2012, 08:46 AM
I will get gas if I need it when I need it.

duke dynamite
03-28-2012, 09:18 AM
http://urbanlegends.about.com/od/government/ss/April-15-Gas-Boycott.htm

False and misleading. Here's why:

1. The flier above was copied almost verbatim from a chain email (http://urbanlegends.about.com/od/government/a/gas_boycott.htm) that went around five years ago, in April 2007. The date is new, but the message is the same. It didn't work (http://urbanlegends.about.com/b/2007/05/16/gas-boycott-postmortem.htm) in 2007, and it won't work in 2012 for the same reasons.

2. Contrary to what's stated above, there was no nationwide "gas out" in 1997. None. There was one in 1999 (http://urbanlegends.about.com/library/blgas.htm), and it did generate a fair amount of media attention, but it didn't cause gas prices to drop 30 cents per gallon overnight — in fact, it didn't cause gas prices to drop at all. Despite the popularity of the chain letter, the 1999 "event" attracted few active participants and was completely ineffectual (http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/1999/05/01/MN8582.DTL).

3. The figures don't add up. If (as unlikely as it is) 100 million U.S. drivers did refuse en masse to refill their tanks on April 15, the total amount unspent on fuel that day could add up to as much as $3 billion. It doesn't follow that the boycott would decrease the oil companies' revenues by $3 billion, however, given that normal gasoline sales per day, across the entire United States, is less than half that much to begin with.

4. Whether the total impact on revenue was a half-billion, 3 billion, or 10 billion dollars, the sales lost due to a one-day consumer boycott wouldn't dent the oil companies' profits at all in the long run. Think about it. Every driver who refuses to buy gas on Sunday is still going to have to fill their tank on Monday, Tuesday, or Wednesday, which will rapidly make up for Sunday's lost sales. Gross profits for the month as a whole, if not the week, will end up being normal, or very close to it.

A meaningful boycott would entail participants actually consuming less fuel — and doing so in a sustained, organized, disciplined fashion over a defined period of time — not just skipping a day before filling up as usual.

Since86
03-28-2012, 09:29 AM
A meaningful boycott would entail participants actually consuming less fuel — and doing so in a sustained, organized, disciplined fashion over a defined period of time — not just skipping a day before filling up as usual.

Well this is wrong. Our fuel consumption has been going down for years now, and prices continue to climb. It's because oil is a global market and other countries, like China and India, have an increased demand that far outweighs our decreased demand.

Bball
03-28-2012, 10:09 AM
If the idea was to send a signal and there were tumbleweeds rolling through gas pump islands come April 15th then it might at least send the signal to politicians that Americans are fed up with the out of control fuel prices as well as the fact that supply and demand in the American market isn't even an issue for prices since Big Oil has just exported our excess thus artificially shrinking supply... and tipping the supply and demand scales in their favor for prices and profits.

But telling consumers to just get their fuel on the 14th or 16th doesn't hurt anyone's pockets. As long as you consume the same amount of fuel over the course of the week... or month... then at best the oil companies will have increased profits on the 14th and 16th, even if they take a hit on the 15th. The average for the 14th, 15th, and 16th will be exactly the same.

The other issue I see is the 15th is a Sunday. I expect fewer people buy fuel on a Sunday anyway so unless this thing was to really become a super movement that nearly 100% of the people followed then we're probably not even going to see a dent in big oil's regular Sunday sales.

So technically, it can't just be to shift your purchase from one day to the next to have any impact on big oil directly. There does need to actually be no fuel used. It might be better to have Sunday April 15th be "Park your car day". Just don't use fuel at all on April 15th.

Unfortunately, the amount we save will just be exported so the supply and demand equation will just be manipulated to keep the existing balance as well as speculation high along with profits.

And if it's just to be a signal to Washington that it's time to act in some way... well then the message needs to shift to be more accurate and less urban legend. And it needs to be followed to the point of tumbleweeds rolling between the pumps.

Knucklehead Warrior
03-28-2012, 11:54 AM
We've reduced our gasoline consumption by about 3% since 2007, but we've more than made up for it by doubling our ethanol consumption. One reason why corn prices went way up, and then way down when farmers grew more corn. Supply and demand.

While I have no numbers on India and China consumption, it's pretty obvious they have a pretty big impact. When their GDP #s start perking up again, they'll probably have even more demand. Wait until your average Chinese have cars and want to go places in them. At some point there will be a great competition for oil and it'll get ugly.
:box:

indygeezer
03-28-2012, 12:25 PM
No, there has never been a successful no-gas day...and believe me, I've seen em all.

Now, strictly as a business decision I traded my F-150 Super CrewCab for a Toyota Prius. But I would have done that if the price was $2.00 a gallon. Strictly a business and economics decision not based on Global Warming or whatever energy plan the President comes up with, this was strictly a cost reduction plan.....plus it never hurts the image to show a client that you are "environmentally friendly" even when you are a conservationist not an enviromentalist.

Trader Joe
03-28-2012, 04:42 PM
How was he being a Dbag? He was just stating his opinion on this topic.

vapacersfan
03-28-2012, 04:47 PM
FWIW, UB's post came across as harsh when I read the post.

Gotta love the internet, where tone is hard to read at times.

Back on point, good intentions, but bad execution. As others have said, one day wont do jack to major oil.

travmil
03-28-2012, 06:15 PM
At some point there will be a great competition for oil and it'll get ugly.
:box:

And when it does, the US will be one of the very few countries that won't be forced to go through OPEC and compete in a global market to get their oil. People forget just how much oil this country is sitting on and how much more it has left in the ground.

Mr.ThunderMakeR
03-28-2012, 10:36 PM
Besides all the good points already given for why this is pretty dumb idea, I'm curious as to what those who support this are actually hoping to accomplish? What exactly is the message going to change? A temporary increase in barrels of crude sold? This is a simple supply and demand issue Supply is finite and is decreasing, demand continues to increase as the human population continues to explode. Prices are going to go up, that's what happens. The daily and even seasonal fluctuations in gas prices are mostly due to people trying to make a quick buck off the trading of oil futures.

grace
03-29-2012, 07:06 PM
Not buying gas on one day is going to freak out the oil companies? It's not like they think you'll never come back.

Shade
03-29-2012, 07:19 PM
Well this is wrong. Our fuel consumption has been going down for years now, and prices continue to climb. It's because oil is a global market and other countries, like China and India, have an increased demand that far outweighs our decreased demand.

Additionally, speculators are driving prices up.

jeffg-body
03-29-2012, 11:24 PM
These gas prices are killing me. I wonder if my local gas station has financing.

LetsTalkPacers
03-30-2012, 10:24 AM
These gas prices are killing me. I wonder if my local gas station has financing.
You joke, but many of us (not me) have to choose between gas or groceries some weeks.

Since86
03-30-2012, 01:10 PM
Additionally, speculators are driving prices up.

Sure, they're a part of the problem, but inflation is the major part of it that no one ever mentions.

That comes directly from the federal government and the Fed.