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View Full Version : Jeff Green to have Heart Surgery; Will Miss Season



Lance George
12-17-2011, 12:43 PM
BostonHerald.com - Celtics Insider - Green to have heart surgery; will miss season (http://www.bostonherald.com/blogs/sports/celtics/index.php/2011/12/17/green-to-have-heart-surgery-will-miss-season/?utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter)


Jeff Green will have surgery to repair his aorta and will miss the season.

The 25-year-old is expected to make a full recovery.

The medical issue arose when Green was taking a physical last week. He said the problem was found when he took a stress test.


Since then, he has seen a number of specialists, the last of which was in Cleveland at the Cleveland Clinic yesterday.


Because Green could not pass the physical, the free agent contract he signed with the Celtics will be voided.

idioteque
12-17-2011, 12:45 PM
Sucks. I waited on him a few times when I worked at Nordstrom, seemed like a good guy.

imawhat
12-17-2011, 12:51 PM
Wow, that's scary. It's good that he had that stress test.

I wish him a speedy recovery.

vnzla81
12-17-2011, 12:54 PM
Damn that sucks, hope he is fine.

Basketball Fan
12-17-2011, 01:17 PM
Better to find that out now than to collapse on the court.. would've brought out some Reggie Lewis flashbacks..

xBulletproof
12-17-2011, 01:56 PM
I really don't like that they voided his contract. For lackof a better term .... seems heartless.

I understand it, but do not like it at all.

shags
12-17-2011, 03:36 PM
I really don't like that they voided his contract. For lackof a better term .... seems heartless.

I understand it, but do not like it at all.

The issue was found during the routine physical teams give to every player. So technically the contract was never processed.

Sandman21
12-17-2011, 03:37 PM
Thank god they caught it.

PG was talking on twitter last week about how the stress test was the worst part of the physical. Hopefully, he's looking at this differently now.

Day-V
12-17-2011, 03:39 PM
It's gonna sound weird, but he's a VERY lucky guy. Who knows what would've happened had they not done that Stress Test?

CableKC
12-17-2011, 03:44 PM
is this type of damage something that can happen 'all of a sudden'?

or

is this something that can go undetected for long periods of time?

I'm just wondering why something like this wasn't caught before.

Sollozzo
12-17-2011, 03:54 PM
Damn that sucks. Scary. Thank God they found it.

imawhat
12-17-2011, 03:55 PM
Could be that different teams have different stress tests.

I wonder what's involved.

vnzla81
12-17-2011, 03:58 PM
Ric Bucher


Lots of questions about Green's contract being voided. Educated guess: never passed physical, so contract never was officially processed.



Source gives 2nd reason for voiding deal: Celtics retain him as RFA. If contract stands, costs Boston $9m and he's UFA next summer.



For those interpreting voided contract as cold: Cs still want him around team, still very much in their plans. As they say: it's a business.

Sparhawk
12-17-2011, 04:23 PM
Better to find that out now than to collapse on the court.. would've brought out some Reggie Lewis flashbacks..

Definitely sad, but better caught now than later.

I also kinda wished that 2K12 would have the Celts team that had Reggie Lewis, he was fastly becoming a fav player before he died. So sad.

Really?
12-17-2011, 07:31 PM
Dang that sucks, best wishes to him.

A.B.Hollywood
12-17-2011, 08:24 PM
They are dangerously thin at SF/PF now. Hate to bring this up considrring the circumstances but I cant help myself:

Granger + DC for Rondo? We should do this and now.

SoupIsGood
12-17-2011, 08:52 PM
hey cleveland clinic, that's where my fiancee is also being treating, and coincidentally has had a half-dozen heart surgeries there now too. he's in extremely good hands there. the doctors go way beyond "above and beyond."

Kemo
12-17-2011, 09:43 PM
Don't know if it has been reported yet, but he has an aortic aneurysm.

Gamble1
12-17-2011, 10:10 PM
is this type of damage something that can happen 'all of a sudden'?

or

is this something that can go undetected for long periods of time?

I'm just wondering why something like this wasn't caught before.
Yes and Yes.

We don't know where the aneurysm is but it could have been caused by trauma or just hypertension. Doc's normally don't look for something unless symptoms occur. I have no clue what an NBA physical contains but if they did an echo or some other scan they could have found something that wasn't there the last time.

Good thing for Green they found it now.

Pacerized
12-18-2011, 12:54 AM
They are dangerously thin at SF/PF now. Hate to bring this up considrring the circumstances but I cant help myself:

Granger + DC for Rondo? We should do this and now.

Granger alone makes a lot more then Rondo who makes 10 mil this year.
That happens to be exactly what West makes. I'd do that trade straight up, then look to roll Hill or DC for another big. West can't be traded until March 1st. though. If that's not enough maybe West and Hill or West and DC for Rondo and a 1st.
Rondo is on a reasonable contract through the 14/15 season considering what he brings.

beast23
12-18-2011, 01:00 AM
Could be that different teams have different stress tests.

I wonder what's involved.
Well, I can't speak about every type of stress test, if indeed there are multiple types. But I can tell you about mine. Steps are:

1. Lay on an exam table while a technician obtains ultrasound readings of your heart "at rest". This involves poking around with an ultrasound around your heart and ribs. Part of the procedure involves holding a deep breath for several seconds while ultrasound readings are taken. Then, taking a deep breath and letting out, without taking another breath, holding it for several seconds, while ultrasound readings are taken.

2. You then run on a treadmill until your heart reaches a target range. They want to take additional ultrasound readings while your heart remains above the minimum heart rate of the range, so typically you will run on the tread mill until your heart range is toward the higher end of the target range. The target range is established by your age. For example, I am 59 and the minimum of my range is 137. The younger your age and the better condition you are in the more your heart rate needs to be above the minimum of your target range.

3. Lastly, you lay back down on the exam table, where all the ultrasound readings are again recorded. At this time, you have run long enough to put your heart "under stress" and you are out of breath. So, it can be difficult to hold your breath long enough to get the best results for the readings that they want to take.

A cardiologist can then make an immediate evaluation of various parameters of your heart related to stress.

I don't know whether this test would yield everything that the NBA athletes go through in their stress tests, but it is probably at least part of it.

beast23
12-18-2011, 01:08 AM
Don't know if it has been reported yet, but he has an aortic aneurysm.
If that is the case, I wonder whether he will return to basketball.

I don't know if there are multiple procedures for the repair, but my dad, two uncles and a friend all had large stints placed in their aortas. In my dad's case, his was monitored for two years before reaching the size (8 cm) that they considered as needing surgical attention.

Folks with stints in major vessels go about their normal activities following their recovery. But most folks don't exert themselves as physically as professional athletes do.

So, I wonder if a person with an aortic stint is cleared to continue playing profession basketball.

1984
12-18-2011, 10:30 PM
What a shame. The Celtics are aging toward irrelevance. Young players like Rondo and Green are their future.

1984
12-18-2011, 10:38 PM
I'm not a cardiovascular surgeon, but I cannot imagine a recovery to pro-basketball.

xBulletproof
12-18-2011, 10:42 PM
I'm not a cardiovascular surgeon, but I cannot imagine a recovery to pro-basketball.

Turiaf had heart surgery if I recall correctly.

cramerica
12-20-2011, 12:17 PM
Hoiberg comments on this as this was the same thing he had.

http://espn.go.com/nba/story/_/id/7370188/nba-fred-hoiberg-feels-jeff-green-pain


Add a grave-sounding issue such as heart surgery to the Boston Celtics' notorious penchant for misleading injury diagnoses -- see: Garnett, Kevin in 2008 -- and it's hard not to wonder if Jeff Green indeed will be back next season.

Former NBA guard Fred Hoiberg, one of four previous NBA players to suffer the same heart condition Green has -- an aortic aneurysm -- is confident Green will return. At full strength. Even though Hoiberg never did. At all.

"He can definitely come back and play," Hoiberg says. "I had every intention of coming back, too, but I had a lot of complications."

Hoiberg is the only one of the previous four NBA players to have heart surgery not to play again. Etan Thomas, Robert "Tractor" Traylor and Ronny Turiaf all had the same procedure. Thomas and Turiaf are in the league today. Traylor didn't return to the NBA after his surgery in 2005 but played six more seasons of professional basketball overseas before dying of a heart attack last spring in Puerto Rico. The cause and circumstances of Traylor's death never have been publicized, but at 6-8 and well over 300 pounds, Traylor battled obesity for a good part of his life.

Green actually can thank Hoiberg, in part, for the discovery of his aneurysm. Hoiberg, then with the Minnesota Timberwolves, became aware of his condition only because he took an echocardiogram as part of a medical examination to qualify for a life insurance policy.

The insurance company didn't tell him why he failed, so Hoiberg assumed it was for an abnormal valve he'd had since birth and became aware of as a sophomore at Iowa State. He finished the season, led the league in 3-point shooting percentage and then went for another exam in May, where he learned the startling news.

Hoiberg's surgery, coupled with the death of Atlanta Hawks center Jason Collier a few months later from an enlarged heart, prompted the league to make echocardiograms a mandatory part of preseason physicals.

Five days after the original operation, a routine check-up revealed that in the process of repairing Hoiberg's aneurysm, the firing mechanism that triggers a heart to beat was damaged and that Hoiberg needed a pacemaker implanted.

After eight months of recovery, he had offers from both the Phoenix Suns and Minnesota Timberwolves to finish the 2005-06 season with them, along with the chance to make history by becoming the first pacemaker-equipped NBA player. After discussing the risks with his wife and as a 32-year-old father of four kids, he elected to go into coaching instead, joining the Timberwolves' staff. He is now head coach at his alma mater, Iowa State.

If Green's experience is anything like Hoiberg's, the toughest challenge will be now through his recovery from the surgery.

"It's a tough blow, it really is," Hoiberg says. "There are no symptoms, so it's like a kick to the gut. I'll never forget the day they told me. But the hardest thing is the recovery process. You don't think you're going to run again. It's a very invasive procedure. They shut down your system and then they have to crack you open and wire you back together again."

Hoiberg says the abnormal valve now requires more surgery, so for the time being he is limited in the kind of exercise he can do. But he remains convinced that the only permanent impact on Green will be a change in his outlook on life. Green has only thanked everyone, via his Twitter account, for their concern and good wishes, but has not spoken publicly since the Celtics announced he would be undergoing surgery.

"It definitely changes your perspective on what's important," Hoiberg says.