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Unclebuck
02-09-2004, 05:03 PM
Amazing to me that only once have the pacers finished better than .500 on the road and in 2000 they were only 20-21 on the road.





http://www.nba.com/pacers/news/question_040209.html





Q. I saw in the league standings that the only teams with winning road records this season are New Jersey, Indiana, Sacramento, Minnesota, and San Antonio. I don’t think it’s a coincidence that this list includes all of the divisional leaders and the teams with the four best records in basketball. I also saw that the Pacers 17th road win surpasses their total for all of last season. What are the Pacers doing differently in their approach to road games this season? Does it have to do with their patient offense, tenacious defense, preparation, and/or something mental? How does their road record this season compare to the season they went to the Finals? (From Ben in Fishers, IN)

A. Here’s some perspective on the team’s road record (17-9, tied with Minnesota for the best in the league): the Pacers have finished with a winning record on the road just once in their NBA history (26-15 in 1997-98). The season they went to the NBA Finals (1999-00), the Pacers were 20-21 away from Conseco Fieldhouse.

And last season, of course, they were 16-25 (after losing 12 of their final 15). The difference has been a combination of factors.

The style of play implemented by Coach Rick Carlisle and his staff is much more conducive to winning on the road, because it is based on consistently tight defense and efficient offense. In other words, it’s a disciplined, tough-minded style that not only translates well to the road, but should be more effective in the playoffs because the players have become accustomed to grinding out victories in unfavorable circumstances.

There has been a tighter ship in terms of discipline, as well. Players aren’t allowed to be late without some form of punishment. Not to single out Jamaal Tinsley, but as recent examples, he twice was removed from the starting lineup because he was late either for a practice or the game-day shootaround. On top of it all is the fact the players are all a year older and wiser about how to handle the rigors and temptations of the road. When they get on the team plane, they understand they’re taking a business trip. And they’ve done a very good job of closing the deal.

Hicks
02-09-2004, 05:09 PM
Yeah, I was surprised to see the 2000 team had a sub .500 road record.

Naptown_Seth
04-21-2008, 11:13 AM
Bump. Stumbled on this and as the big Rick jock rider around here I thought it was very noteworthy. Funny how much time and SPIN alter people's view of how things were and how they've "improved".


The style of play implemented by Coach Rick Carlisle and his staff is much more conducive to winning on the road, because it is based on consistently tight defense and efficient offense. In other words, it’s a disciplined, tough-minded style that not only translates well to the road, but should be more effective in the playoffs because the players have become accustomed to grinding out victories in unfavorable circumstances.
Suddenly a few years later I'm supposed to buy into high flying action and lots of early shot attempts as conducive to getting far in the playoffs (and winning on the road)?


There has been a tighter ship in terms of discipline, as well. Players aren’t allowed to be late without some form of punishment. Not to single out Jamaal Tinsley, but as recent examples, he twice was removed from the starting lineup because he was late either for a practice or the game-day shootaround.
Someone want to clue Bird in because according to him Rick was letting 'em run wild.

This point really still irks me because Rick was so heavily slammed for player behavior, including Bird scapegoating him a bit, and then not one thing improved this year. In fact they've had just as many incidents now as they did with Rick. And as bad as the brawl was that was clearly a special situation and a two-way street. Counter to that has any other coach ever kept Ron Artest under control long enough to make an AS team and/or win DPOY?


So maybe a little perspective from Rick's first year with the team is needed, something to counter the "now they mean business, no more letting players ruin things" and "now they are going to play good ball".

BillS
04-21-2008, 03:21 PM
This point really still irks me because Rick was so heavily slammed for player behavior, including Bird scapegoating him a bit, and then not one thing improved this year.

Completely, utterly, totally disagree. This team's demeanor on the floor was totally different than under Rick.

You can count big incidents like Harrison going off, but you have to realize that there was a distinct lack of constant smaller incidents.

While I'm not one of those who was down on Rick (though I agree that most coaches wear out after a few years), I have to say JO'B seemed to command more respect from the team and have a firmer hand on the attitude of the players in the game.

Since86
04-21-2008, 03:29 PM
That might have to be due to the fact different players were on the floor under JOB, than Rick.

We wouldn't have seen the problems that were going on if Jax was replaced by Dunleavy in the Atl deal.

Dealing with Mike is completely different than dealing with Stephen Jackson.

Los Angeles
04-21-2008, 03:48 PM
Let's not forget that the actual rules as well as the style of officiating have changed quite a bit since then.

The Spurs had outside threats like ginobili, et. al. to stay competitive. Other "grind it out" teams from that era were not so lucky.