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indygeezer
12-10-2011, 09:28 AM
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1) Incorporate a tax on players playing in states that have no income tax, equal to the average of the state income taxes paid by all other players. A $10,000,000 tax free salary is alot more than say Indiana where that salary is taxed at what, 2 percent?

2) All advertising monies earned by the players should be payed to the league and counted as part of the Basketball Related Income or given to all players equally.

3) give the smaller or cold weather teams a larger cap number than warm weather or big market teams. Salaries could be adjusted if the player is traded.

I know these are largely ineffective but some means of inducing the players to smaller market teams needs to be found.

FINAL THOUGHT......... Split up the NBA back to it's 8 teams of the '60's and reform the ABA using the smaller market teams. Basketball was a lot of fun then...and the bigs can re-learn what it is like to play the same team 16 times in 3 mos. (I still hate to see a Spurs uniform)


So, you got better ideas?

Ownagedood
12-10-2011, 09:31 AM
I like the final thought one... As i mentioned in another post i have seriously contemplated removing myself of interest with the NBA.. Though most of the more talented players would probably go to the NBA over the ABA, it would be nice to have a chance to win something in the ABA. I would take that change anyday.

EDIT: ...The part that would be hard is how do you set up the draft? Would you let the NBA take all the players they wanted until their 2 rounds were up? Kinda rough because then we turn into more of a D-League thing.

diamonddave00
12-10-2011, 09:42 AM
As much as I hate the current system , forming a "New ABA league" only puts Indianapolis back as seen as a minor league sports town. With the Colts becoming at best a rebuilding team , Indianapolis has worked too hard to shake that image to simply return to it.

But as a follower of the Pacers since their very first game I echo the sentiment of cheering for a League Champion team being a great experience. It was so exciting to cheer the ABA team on and even the days of the 90's NBA glory Pacers never came close to equaling that feeling.

BillS
12-10-2011, 09:51 AM
I'd want to see a soccer style two-tier league where teams can move up or down as they evolve before a pure major/minor league based solely on market size.

indygeezer
12-10-2011, 09:55 AM
As for the draft....the NBA had their draft and the ABA had theirs. Yes, they fought for the same players but the ABA won many of those drafts because of three primary reasons.

1)money
2) a different and exciting style of up-tempo play
3) with only 8 NBA teams the rosters were so stacked that many really good players never had a chance so the ABA offered that opportunity to a lot of players (can you believe that back then we held 8-10 round drafts)
But those wouldnt come into play here......

so how to fix the NBA????

JB24
12-10-2011, 10:08 AM
I'd want to see a soccer style two-tier league where teams can move up or down as they evolve before a pure major/minor league based solely on market size.

I don't think it would work. European football (soccer) teams have established fan bases and their attendance doesn't really get all that affected when they're relegated. It isn't weird for some second division teams to average 30,000 a year in places like Germany and the UK.

At the risk of generalizing, NBA fans are notoriously fair-weather. If you think attendances right now are bad, they'd probably be d-league bad in a rel/pro system. Some teams just wouldn't survive.

Also, without drastic changes to the system, it would make it that much harder to attract quality players. Football is based on a free-market system so theoretically, lower-division teams can still attract solid players if they have the money. With a cap system, that just worsens the current landscape (stars forcing trades. Why does Chris paul want to play in a lower-tier league?)

1984
12-10-2011, 02:18 PM
You're forgetting one thing: ownership. No one is going to buy an ABA team for $300,000,000. As a result no owner, in his right mind, would move his team. At the very least, the risk is too high.

A better solution would have been to hold out and let Amare and Melodramatic have their own, alternative league. It would have bled dry in less than two years. Meanwhile, the NBA would get back to fundamental, competitive basketball.

Heisenberg
12-10-2011, 02:22 PM
Get rid of max contracts. Let Lebron and Paul and Howard and Kobe and etc etc make what they're actually worth. If the players still want to team up they're turning down A LOT of money.

CooperManning
12-10-2011, 02:29 PM
2) All advertising monies earned by the players should be payed to the league and counted as part of the Basketball Related Income or given to all players equally.


This is crazy. Why would players do endorsements at all if they weren't getting the money for it? Lebron's not going to wake up early on a Saturday to shoot a Nike commercial so that Jeff Foster, Baron Davis, and every other NBA player can get a little cut of the endorsement pie -- and I wouldn't blame him on this one.

1984
12-10-2011, 02:32 PM
I'm still not certain what the new CBA accomplished. It seems the NBA discovered a new way to accomplish the same results. In ten years, I hope there is fundamental and dynamic change.

Ozwalt72
12-10-2011, 02:34 PM
We need Dr. House.

trs72
12-10-2011, 04:48 PM
Get rid of max contracts. Let Lebron and Paul and Howard and Kobe and etc etc make what they're actually worth. If the players still want to team up they're turning down A LOT of money.

This is what I think as well. Doubt to many of these bums would take a lot less to play with their buddy.

Eleazar
12-10-2011, 04:58 PM
I'm still not certain what the new CBA accomplished. It seems the NBA discovered a new way to accomplish the same results. In ten years, I hope there is fundamental and dynamic change.

Basically they just took a baby step. With the new BRI split it will be easier for teams to break even, but that is about all that happened. There was nothing to make the league more competetive.

Heisenberg
12-10-2011, 05:13 PM
I'm still not certain what the new CBA accomplished. It seems the NBA discovered a new way to accomplish the same results. In ten years, I hope there is fundamental and dynamic change.
If you're not gonna be able to compete you won't (shouldn't) go broke doing it. That's what changed.

pezasied182
12-10-2011, 05:46 PM
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1) Incorporate a tax on players playing in states that have no income tax, equal to the average of the state income taxes paid by all other players. A $10,000,000 tax free salary is alot more than say Indiana where that salary is taxed at what, 2 percent?

2) All advertising monies earned by the players should be payed to the league and counted as part of the Basketball Related Income or given to all players equally.

3) give the smaller or cold weather teams a larger cap number than warm weather or big market teams. Salaries could be adjusted if the player is traded.

I know these are largely ineffective but some means of inducing the players to smaller market teams needs to be found.

FINAL THOUGHT......... Split up the NBA back to it's 8 teams of the '60's and reform the ABA using the smaller market teams. Basketball was a lot of fun then...and the bigs can re-learn what it is like to play the same team 16 times in 3 mos. (I still hate to see a Spurs uniform)


So, you got better ideas?

1. Players are moving from lower income taxes, to those with higher income taxes. California, New Jersey and New York are 3 of the top 5 highest taxed states. I don't see why this is necessary. People living in Indiana and Illinois pay 7% less taxes than those living in California, so should players on the Pacers and Bulls be taxed more by the league to make it fair?

2. As said before, why should LeBron and other top players have to do endorsements and commercials so other players in the league can get paid more?

3. San Antonio is a small market team, as is Oklahoma City. Chicago is a cold weather team, as is Boston. Do these teams deserve to have special treatment from the league?

indygeezer
12-11-2011, 10:10 AM
I never said my ideas were good...just what I see as good for the Pacers. :D
I did forget about the high taxes in NY but places like Florida and Texas have a distinct likability advantage + no tax.
As for the sharing of endorsement monies. The analogy I see is that in my 9-5 I was required to turn over any patents I earned as intellectual property of the company...for which I was given the grand sum of $1.00. It is done in business all of the time. Anything you earn or create during your employment belongs to the employer. As a realtor anything I earn in the line of my realty expertise is paid to the broker and he decides how much of it I will be paid (set percentage). And so my idea was to level the playing field. Howver, if Lebron doesn't want to get up on Saturday morning and share the endorsement fee then fine, nobody would force him to get up. I'm sure ALL of the players are making plenty w/o the endorsement money anyway.

rm1369
12-11-2011, 10:53 AM
Get rid of max contracts. Let Lebron and Paul and Howard and Kobe and etc etc make what they're actually worth. If the players still want to team up they're turning down A LOT of money.

This is a huge part of a true solution. Putting a cap on max salaries only helps the destination franchises. Not only do they get the best players but they get them for a salary that is similar to what the non destination cities have to pay to get 2nd and 3rd tier players - increasing the impact of having a top tier guy (or two). If top players are able to get what they are worth it would be nearly impossible for them to team up - unless they are willing to leave significant money on the table. It also allows non destination teams to atleast attempt to outbid the destination cities. What was LBJ worth to Cleveland?

No max salary, no or only partial guaranteed contracts, and a hard cap are what the league needs to even the playing field (as much as possible). That would have required losing at least one full season, but IMO it would have been worth it.