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SoupIsGood
10-30-2004, 12:10 PM
http://msn.foxsports.com/story/3118948

I accidentally read a Charley Rosen article.... man this guy makes me mad. I read the Indy and Detroit reviews, what a load of BS. Since when does Detroit "coast"?

Unclebuck
10-30-2004, 12:13 PM
He seems to be a little bitter



Central Division preview
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Charley Rosen / Special to FOXSports.com
Posted: 17 hours ago



Cleveland Cavaliers

Even in the cutthroat Central Division, the Cavaliers have a decent chance of qualifying for the playoffs.

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With the aging, yet still capable Eric Snow added to the mix, and Jeff McInnis on hand from Day 1, there's less pressure for LeBron James to be Superman during his second go-round through the league. Their backcourt lacks a dependable scorer (Dajuan Wagner is too short, too streaky and too defenseless), but is still potent enough to hold its own against most opponents.

Zydrunas Ilgauskas has become an underrated presence in the paint on both ends of the court. He could always score, but his rebounding and shot-blocking have significantly improved. And with more shots available with Carlos Boozer elsewhere, look for Ziggy to finally get the props he's earned.

The biggest hole is at power forward. Absent Boozer, Drew Gooden will be plugged into the gap. This guy is strictly a finesse player whose talent level simply doesn't measure up to most of the other starting power forwards in the NBA. That's why the Cavs need to be surprised by Anderson Varejao and/or Luke Jackson an unlikely possibility.

Moreover, the bench is thin, and the Cavs lack the board power to run. An injury to any player in the normal rotation would knock Cleveland back into the pack of playoff pretenders.

Young player to watch: Who else except LeBron? His inconsistent hand mechanics make every jump shot an adventure. But in his sophomore season, the game-time action should slow down so that his understanding will encompass a wider and deeper view of the court.


Chicago Bulls
This team just doesn't fit together.

Take the big men, for example a combination of confused youngsters (Eddy Curry and Tyson Chandler), a weary-legged Antonio Davis, and the distinctly mediocre Othella Harrington, whose primary advantage is his left-handedness.

The point guard, Kirk Hinrich, is talented, young and eager.

At the skill positions (the shooting guard and small forwards), the Bulls must rely on too many inexperienced players Andres Nocioni from Argentina, plus a pair of rookies, Luol Deng and Ben Gordon. Because the Bulls are so dependent on so many untried players getting the proper experience in a hurry, the team is doomed to another season of unfulfilled potential.

Young player to watch: Of Hinrich, Chandler and Curry, it's Curry who can possibly make the biggest impact. He's an instinctive and multi-dimensional scorer in the low post. But can Curry get his body and his mind in gear?


Milwaukee Bucks
In order to keep playing into May, Michael Redd, Keith Van Horn and the rapidly aging Toni Kukoc must routinely fill the hoop from the outskirts. The trouble is that having to make so many perimeter shots puts an enormous burden on the shooters. Also, over the course of a long season, shooters do tire and suffer slumps. Such prolonged misfiring would be disastrous for the Bucks.

Also, the Bucks don't have the monster glass-eaters to provide put-backs and second-chance shots.

That's why Milwaukee desperately needs T.J. Ford to make a complete and timely recovery from his severe back injury. The speedy Ford can trigger fastbreak opportunities that can create easy buckets and take the pressure off the Bucks shooters. Ford's replacements are Mo Williams and Mike James, both of whom are strictly stopgaps.

Last year, the Bucks overachieved on defense, and to equal their success they must reprise that same scrappiness, awareness and all-out hustle. This might be a difficult undertaking unless Milwaukee gets off to a quick start something that's hard to imagine sans Ford.

Teams that live or die by the jump shot, usually suffer a painful demise.

Young player to watch: Ford is quick as a wish, and eventually coach Terry Porter will tinker with his jump shot until the young man becomes a decent shooter. But when, and if, Ford returns to action, will his back miseries cost him a step or two? If this is the case, then he'll be just another shot-stricken, almost-good-enough runt.


Indiana Pacers
Is their brief stint as serious contender already over? There are signs that this might indeed be the case.

Last season's playoffs proved that Ron Artest is not only unreliable, but a bona fide head case. Reggie Miller is reduced to doing a bad imitation of himself. Jermaine O'Neal has yet to convince serious NBA watchers that he's ready to be a responsible go-to scorer. Jamaal Tinsley continues to make poor decisions with the ball. Austin Croshere is short on talent and short on too many of his jump shots. Jonathan Bender has yet to string together two solid rotations. Stephen Jackson is wild as the wind.

The Pacers' defense is good enough to routinely strangle the league's weak sisters, overcome most middle-of-the-road teams, and beat a sufficient number of powerhouse teams to raise false expectations for postseason success.

And if Rick Carlisle's body language reveals that he really doesn't believe in his players, how can they believe in t themselves?

Young player to watch: Bender is an injury-prone, seven-foot, long-distance shooter who would rather dance away from contact than bang and be banged. Is he a powerless power forward, or a giant-sized small forward? Will he keep his body parts intact long enough for anybody to find out?


Detroit Pistons
All reigning champs look invincible and Detroit is no different. That said, there are unavoidable pitfalls to their repeating.

The champions have a tendency to play in cruise control Hey, we're the champs! That means we can turn our game on whenever we need to. The truth is that in order to win successive titles, the top dogs have to play hard all the time, simply because every other team in the league will be pointing to their encounters with them. Beating the champs gives an opponent instant credibility and self-esteem.

A huge reason why the Pistons triumphed last year was their admirable team chemistry. But chemistry is always a delicate entity in the existential world of the NBA.

And the Pistons' chemistry was significantly altered during the off-season.

Subtract Corliss Williamson and add Antonio No-dyess, who's made whatever reputation he has by putting up good numbers with bad teams. Another newcomer with an even more powerful personality is Derrick Coleman. Already on his last legs, will DC sublimate his monstrous ego or call too much attention to himself?

And can the holdover players continue to deal with Larry Brown's constant yipping and habitual cynicism? Both will be in full operation as Brown tries to prove that last year was not a fluke, that he's not to blame for the fiasco in Athens, and that he is, indeed, a genius.

Chemistry works only as long as the W's greatly outnumber the L's. So it would behoove the Pistons to avoid any possible internal dissent by roaring out of the gate.

Still, the Pistons are the champs until somebody beats them.

Young player to watch: Can Tayshaun Prince sustain the plastic-man defense he sicced on Kobe? Will his 6-foot-9, 215-pound frame hold up under a full season of pounding? (Look for Brown to limit Prince's daylight.) And will the rest of the league ever stop biting on Prince's fakes right, and take measures to keep him from spinning left?


Charley Rosen, former CBA coach, author of 12 books about hoops, the next one being A PIVOTAL SEASON HOW THE 1971-72 LA LAKERS CHANGED THE NBA, is a frequent contributor to FOXSports.com.

Anthem
10-30-2004, 02:30 PM
Wow, what a moron.

efx
10-30-2004, 03:32 PM
Man there's an argument for birthcontrol.
If this was written before the start of last season I could have seen his point but how can anyone call Artest a headcase after last season?
No mention of the best record in the leauge. No mention of the reliability of Foster. No mention of the vastly improved play of Artest as well as the fact that he became the DPOTY.

Then again, this little waste of human life is writing for Fox Sports which is kinda like the national enquierer of sports.

Unclebuck
10-30-2004, 03:52 PM
I have re-read what he wrote, and what in the world does he mean about Rick Carlisle's body language. That is just a strange comment

TheSauceMaster
10-30-2004, 04:04 PM
I dunno after the Injury to Reggie was announced I noticed a diffrent tone in our play in the Game last night and Rick looked alittle puzzled and concerned ..maybe that was just my observation.

I'm really worried about how well these guys that have not had much playing time will react to getting alot more mins , there conditioning. Pollard played what 31-32 mins last night and I think it really showed he wasn't used to playing that much time.

Anthem
10-30-2004, 05:35 PM
Man there's an argument for birthcontrol.

:laugh:

Kstat
10-30-2004, 05:53 PM
Subtract Corliss Williamson and add Antonio No-dyess, who's made whatever reputation he has by putting up good numbers with bad teams.

So does that mean if we picked up Elton Brand, that'd be a crappy idea too?:laugh:

We picked up a better shotblocker than corliss, a stronger player, a better inside player, and a great rebounder.....ah well......


The champions have a tendency to play in cruise control Hey, we're the champs! That means we can turn our game on whenever we need to

Cause, as we all know, the Pistons are well-known for thair coasting.....:rolleyes:


The truth is that in order to win successive titles, the top dogs have to play hard all the time

Apparently Rosen was vacationing on Mars from 2000-2003....


And can the holdover players continue to deal with Larry Brown's constant yipping and habitual cynicism?

You know, since Larry always burns his players out after one season, and all....;)


Both will be in full operation as Brown tries to prove that last year was not a fluke, that he's not to blame for the fiasco in Athens, and that he is, indeed, a genius.

Agreed. If the Pistons don't do well this year, Larry Brown may not get into the hall of fame. Oh wait.....



Chemistry works only as long as the W's greatly outnumber the L's. So it would behoove the Pistons to avoid any possible internal dissent by roaring out of the gate.

......so he's saying that losing teams don't have good chemistry? Captain obvious strikes again!