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90'sNBARocked
07-18-2011, 05:58 PM
http://today.msnbc.msn.com/id/43745218/ns/today-good_news/t/-year-old-gives-his-scholarship-other-teens?GT1=43001#



Compton High basketball player Allan Guei felt his classmates needed the money more

Compton High’s graduation ceremony: Guei
wanted to donate the $40,000 to the other
seven students.

“I’ve already been blessed so much and I
know we're living with a bad economy, so I
know this money can really help my
classmates,” Guei said in a statement. “It was
the right decision.”

Guei elaborated on his decision to give the
money away in an interview with ESPN: “I was
already well taken care of to go to school, to
go to university for free. ... I felt like they
needed it more than I did.”

The beneficiaries of Guei’s generosity were
ecstatic.

“It was a shock,” said Omar Guzman, 17, a
runner-up who plans to use the money to
attend San Diego State University. “I’m really
grateful there are people like that out there. It
was generous.”

Another of the seven runners-up, Donald
Dotson, also plans to start at Cal State
Northridge in the fall. Dotson described Guei
as “a very deep, intelligent and warm
person.”

“He's going to go really far in life,” he said in a
statement. “Because of what he’s done for
us, God will bless him. That’s what life is all
about — stepping forward to help other
people.”

Lines that divide — and unite
The free-throw competition was the idea of
Court Crandall, the Hollywood screenwriter
behind the movie “Old School” and a partner
at a Southern California advertising firm.
Crandall was well aware of Compton’s image
problems due to gang-related crime. Many of
the city’s residents also deal with extreme
financial pressures; according to Census
data, more than 25 percent of the city’s
families live below the poverty line.

One day Crandall was watching his teenage
son play basketball with some bright,
ambitious Compton students, and he got to
thinking about the lines that divide us. Then
inspiration struck: Could a free-throw line
bring people together?

He decided to create the free-throw
scholarship competition and make a
stereotype-busting documentary film about
the lives of Compton students in the process.
Compton’s senior class had about 80
students with a GPA of 3.0 or higher; the
eight students who participated in the
competition got selected randomly from that
group.

Crandall’s advertising firm, Wong, Doody,
Crandall, Wiener, raised more than $75,000
for scholarships, making it possible to give
$40,000 to the first-place winner and more
than $5,000 — enough to cover about a year
of college expenses — to each of the seven
runners-up.

Now, with Guei’s added generosity, each of
those seven runners-up has around $11,000
in scholarship money.

jeffg-body
07-18-2011, 11:54 PM
All I can say is wow. Such maturity in a young man should inspire others to help their fellow men and women who need a little help in getting through life.

Anthem
07-19-2011, 07:54 AM
That's cool.

So am I understanding the story correctly? The guy's dad put together a free-throw-shooting contest, the guy won, and then decided not to take any of the money?

Very classy.

smj887
07-19-2011, 10:18 AM
That's cool.

So am I understanding the story correctly? The guy's dad put together a free-throw-shooting contest, the guy won, and then decided not to take any of the money?

Very classy.

They weren't related. The Crandall fellow was watching his own son play and decided to get involved with the Compton school.

90'sNBARocked
07-19-2011, 11:55 AM
It was really in my humble opinion, a perfect example of how a young man's upbringing can have such a profund effect that would rise above what typically one would think of a response from a kid from Compton

Kudos to the parents