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Since86
06-30-2011, 03:39 PM
Behind-the-scenes details of ‘The Decision’ (http://nba-point-forward.si.com/2011/06/30/behind-the-scenes-details-of-the-decision/)

On July 8, 2010, after a season of speculation, LeBron James announced his free-agency destination in a one-hour special on ESPN called The Decision. The concept for the prime-time show (http://adage.com/article/news/lebron-s-entourage-decision-espn/144882/) was hatched in Los Angeles during the 2010 NBA Finals, but it was executed in the tony suburb of Greenwich, Conn. A year later, four key behind-the-scenes operatives speak about their roles in creating the controversial event — the semi-secretive logistics, the intended misdirections, the surprise celebrity participants, and who knew what and when about how their grand production unfolded.

Mark Dowley, former partner at the William Morris Endeavor agency and a Greenwich resident: Ari Emanuel [co-CEO of William Morris] called me and said, “What do you think of the idea of doing the show?” And I really liked it. I like the whole notion of the emancipation of talent. No one could have guessed the level of interest this would get. We had never seen anything like that.

I said we should do it, and I knew Maverick [Carter, LeBron's business manager] and LeBron would agree we should do it for charity. LeBron has a natural preconceived notion about the Boys & Girls Club, and they could sure use the help. I called Maverick, and he loved the idea. He talked to LeBron, and he loved the idea. And then we went out in the course of 10 days and pulled it together.
It always struck me that here we are in [Greenwich], one of the most affluent communities in the world, and we have a terrible gym at the Boys & Girls Club. I thought we could help them out.

Dowley didn’t know how to approach the Boys & Girls Club without blowing the secret, so he called longtime friend Scott Frantz, a Connecticut state legislator and Greenwich resident, and asked him to provide a connection to the club.


Dowley: He’s a guy I can trust. I had the whole world watching and I didn’t want anybody to know where we were shooting this until the last possible minute.

Frantz: Mark didn’t put duct tape over my mouth or anything like that, but the strong hint was that, “Let’s get this organized and not spill the beans.” I didn’t even tell my family. You can’t tell anybody anything — not even your dog.


Frantz had Dowley call Bob DeAngelo, the executive director of the Greenwich Boys & Girls Club, on Sunday, July 4, to pitch the idea.

Dowley: I told him why [Greenwich] made sense. It’s neutral territory, because none of us knew where LeBron was going. It was as neutral as you could get while still being convenient. We worried about doing the show in Cleveland for LeBron’s personal safety. And if we went to any of the other contending cities, people would have thought he was definitely going there. And in Greenwich, I felt like we could get him in and out of town safely.

DeAngelo: I had just gotten back from five weeks of pedaling my bike from San Francisco to Greenwich with friends. When I got home, I had a list of chores to do. The very next day, I was up on a ladder washing windows when someone called — it was Mark Dowley. He asked me if they could use our gym to host this event. He swore me to secrecy. Their plan was to have the location be a total secret, and then at the end of the show, they’d announce where the location of the gym was. I almost fell
off the ladder.

Dowley said the location choice had nothing to do with Carmelo Anthony’s wedding in New York the following weekend.

Dowley: None whatsoever. I heard everything imaginable. That [LeBron] was at [Knicks assistant general manager] Allan Houston’s house and he was going to the Knicks. That he was here for Carmelo’s wedding. I still think most people think that. It’s not true.

Amid all the planning with ESPN and the Club, Dowley had to figure out how to get LeBron from Ohio to Greenwich on the day of the show without anyone noticing.


Dowley: I had a private plane in a hangar in White Plains, N.Y., and we went out and picked him up in Ohio on Thursday [July 8]. I have a good friend, Steve O’Neill, who is the CEO of CitationAir [a private jet company], and I told him what we were doing and to get LeBron here very quietly. I needed to make sure no one in Cleveland knew where the plane was going. We were going to fly out of Akron, but we switched to Cleveland at the last minute.

O’Neill: I knew about the plan seven to 10 days in advance. [The location of the Ohio flight] was originally intended to be sort of a nondescript place where we’d pick him up, because he was allegedly being followed by the press who wanted to know where he was going.

Dowley: LeBron’s people switched it from Akron to Cleveland. LeBron had something to do before that was closer to Cleveland.

O’Neill: Each airport has fixed-based operations — locations you can choose to depart from. We chose one in Cleveland that we thought would be suitable for the trip and would be more private. Sometime before that flight departed, they requested a different FBO at the same airport. Honestly, that happens every day.

Dowley: We did have to file multiple flight plans for where we going afterward, but we did not give those to anyone. I trust Steve. He made sure we did everything legally but at the same time had the leeway to change plans at the last minute. And you can do that with the FAA [Federal Aviation Administration] at the last minute.

O’Neill: Obviously, one plan involved Miami. Another involved canceling the flight if he went with New York and would celebrate there. We needed to make sure we had enough fuel to fly to California if he chose Los Angeles, and a crew that could fly at least six hours.
I was told shortly before the show started that it was going to be Miami. I was probably the only person at CitationAir who knew what was going on every step of the way. I called my office and told the right person there, simply, “It’s going to be Miami.” And he said, “OK, thanks.” And that was it. It was not a big sinister plot. It was, “OK, all the passengers are going to Miami and we’ll dust off that Miami flight plan and pass it to the crew [of the plane].” It was just a matter of whether you point the jet south or west.

Of course it was unusual to be a part of the whole drama around The Decision, and it was slightly unusual not to know where we were going until a few hours before departure. But prepping for stuff like that is a nonevent for us — it’s just what we do. When I write a book on this business, this won’t even get a paragraph. OK, maybe one, but not two. We fly well-known people every single day.

Dowley: [LeBron] arrived [Thursday] afternoon, maybe around 2 p.m., and he spent the next three-and-a-half to four hours at my house in Greenwich. I hired a cop and a security guard to sit on the road in front of my house so no one could get in just in case someone figured out where he was. But nobody knew. We had everybody from ESPN people, Boys & Girls Club people, sponsors and even a couple of my kids and their friends were there. And then Kanye West showed up. He and LeBron are pretty close friends. He called my office and just said he wanted to stop by. The office gave him my address, and he just stopped in. It was funny to watch — all the kids there thought LeBron was pretty cool, but apparently they think Kanye is really, really cool. They just flocked right to him.
We kind of had a rehearsal with LeBron and our team, and we called all the teams and told them what was going on [with the show].

Dowley and DeAngelo were disappointed they didn’t keep the location secret until the end. DeAngelo had planned to surprise the kids by tricking them into believing they were coming to the club to eat pizza and watch the event on television, only to arrive and find LeBron James amid a makeshift ESPN studio.

DeAngelo: Just the thrill of visualizing playing a joke on these kids. We were relishing that. It didn’t play out as a secret, but those kids still hyperventilated when they found out LeBron was coming here.

Dowley: [The location] didn’t become known until the day before, when I called the Greenwich Police Department to tell them what was going on. Within a half-hour, Newsday (http://www.newsday.com/sports/basketball/knicks/the-knicks-fix-1.812055/lebron-will-make-announcement-in-greenwich-conn-1.2086121?qr=1) had it and everyone was calling. I was very disappointed. I love the Greenwich Police Department, but at that point, it went outside of a tight circle where I knew everybody and trusted everybody. Trust me, I wrestled with not telling the police, but I thought it would be a great disservice because you could be creating a riot.

DeAngelo: [When word leaked] my computer screen just blew up with all the emails people sent trying to get in. It was a lot of, “I’m a friend of a friend of a friend, and my grandma is from Cleveland and she’s a big LeBron fan. Could she come?” It was hysterical.

According to Dowley, a half-dozen sponsors paid a total of $3.5 million to $4 million for advertising. The organizers agreed to split the money evenly between Boys & Girls Clubs in every city with a team in contention for LeBron — plus the Greenwich club. Nearby clubs in Bridgeport and Stamford also received gifts. Each sponsor paid about $450,000 apiece for packages that included 30-second spots, bumpers and other ad space. The organizers were able to tack on a premium charge because of the special nature of the event.

Dowley: I did know [he was going to pick Miami]. I can’t comment on [how far in advance] I knew.

Frantz: I was there [at the telecast] and had no idea it was Miami. The vast majority would think he would be doing this because he was signing up with New York. That’s what I thought. The only thing that was a letdown for me, as a Knicks fan, was the actual decision. We all sat there in shock that he wasn’t coming to New York.

Dowley: The only other part that was disappointing was someone at ESPN came out that afternoon and said LeBron would announce the winning city within the first 10 or 15 minutes. That was never the case. No one wanted to drag the show out unnecessarily, but if you reveal the surprise within the first 10 minutes, it’s like showing the end of the movie right away. I was very angry. I don’t remember who it was that said it. When I get pissed off at someone, I don’t remember their name.

DeAngelo: When LeBron said he was going to take his talents to South Beach, you could hear a pin drop. People just didn’t know what to do. And you know how you get that little delay before things are broadcast on television? That split second passed, and then you heard this huge collective groan from all the people crowded outside. After that, LeBron left the gym and went into a small, private room just to quiet down a little bit and to protect himself. He did another interview with someone else, and then he had to leave. He was on a very tight schedule.

DeAngelo: We’ve had a lot of athletes and some really great people come through the Boys & Girls Club. They did have time to sit down and sign autographs. [LeBron] was not able to do that, unfortunately. He got here late and was on a tight schedule for the telecast. He had no time prior and he had to get whisked out of here afterward. When you have someone in like that, the tendency is to say he’s going to be great, and sign a lot of autographs and ham it up and get lots of photos. I’d say we were disappointed we weren’t able to do that [with LeBron]. But what carried the day for me was the generosity he showed for the Boys & Girls Club. Our club got a six-figure gift, 30 Hewlett-Packard computers and a whole bunch of Nike equipment. We totally remodeled our gym and got a climbing wall. It was a really positive thing for us.

Dowley: We went back to my house after the show, had a beer, and Kanye and LeBron talked for a while. We then went to the airplane hangar at White Plains. He and everyone else [not West] got on one plane and went to Miami. I got on another plane and went to Nantucket. I think LeBron at that point felt great about [the show]. We all felt great about how much money we netted for the kids. He didn’t look worried one way or the other. It was, “I’m going to Miami to start the next chapter in my life.” He certainly could have done that show and made a lot more money for himself. But we came up with an experiment. I’m fond of experimenting, and I’m proud of doing something different.

[I]Those involved with the making of the special were dismayed at the way it was received and the way in which LeBron has been portrayed as either a megalomaniac or a dupe of corporate suits who used the show to exploit him.

Dowley: We got a lot of grief for it. A good deed never goes unpunished, you know? LeBron is an exceptionally bright young man. No one is taking advantage of LeBron James. And Maverick Carter is a very bright guy. I’ve done deals with them since and we’ll do deals with them in the future. Everybody can hold their heads up high. The only people who know best about how they felt [about the criticism] are Maverick and LeBron. There is no way they enjoyed a lot of the aftermath. I do know morally and from a socially conscience standpoint, they know they did something good.
The guy who really got wronged was [The Decision interviewer] Jim Gray. The whole original idea was Jim’s and Ari’s and Maverick’s. I thought Jim did a hell of a job. He’s quite a gentleman. This was sports, after all, not U.N. wartime reporting. People just got a little nuts over it.

Cavaliers owner Dan Gilbert’s infamous post-Decision letter to Cleveland fans bashing LeBron was a subject of conversation among the show’s insiders almost immediately.

Dowley: What didn’t get enough play was what Dan Gilbert said afterward. The next day, Maverick and LeBron called me and asked what they should say in response. I gave them two suggestions: “I guess Dan is not going to be sending me a fruit basket again this Christmas.” Or then something about how you can understand why [LeBron] doesn’t want to work for this guy anymore — that [LeBron] needed to get out of this abusive relationship. Because it was abusive and stupid what Gilbert said. Especially since hours before he was calling Maverick at my house, checking in about his offer, hoping LeBron will go back there.

Of course, LeBron did the right thing and just issued a “no comment.”

http://nba-point-forward.si.com/2011/06/30/behind-the-scenes-details-of-the-decision/?sct=hp_t11_a0&eref=sihp&hpt=hp_c2

graphic-er
06-30-2011, 03:49 PM
LOL and so the PR attack on the Players begins.

ECKrueger
06-30-2011, 04:22 PM
Here we go again, another opportunity to bash LBJ.

D0NT SH0OT ME
06-30-2011, 04:41 PM
I would hope all the Lebron haters would actually read this, but who am I kidding.

ECKrueger
06-30-2011, 04:45 PM
Only yourself, only yourself.

Kstat
06-30-2011, 04:48 PM
Seems like a lebron-fluff piece to me. The organizer of one of the biggest mistakes in pro sports attempting to put a great spin on a very bad idea.

LeBron is a great guy. Maverick Carter is a great guy. The whole idea was a good idea. This was all about giving money to the boys and girls clubs from the very beginning....yawn

vapacersfan
06-30-2011, 04:50 PM
An interesting piece, but I would not be surprised at all to find out his agent and/or PR team had a hand it in.

ECKrueger
06-30-2011, 04:51 PM
We’ve had a lot of athletes and some really great people come through the Boys & Girls Club. They did have time to sit down and sign autographs. [LeBron] was not able to do that, unfortunately. He got here late and was on a tight schedule for the telecast. He had no time prior and he had to get whisked out of here afterward. When you have someone in like that, the tendency is to say he’s going to be great, and sign a lot of autographs and ham it up and get lots of photos. I’d say we were disappointed we weren’t able to do that [with LeBron]. But what carried the day for me was the generosity he showed for the Boys & Girls Club. Our club got a six-figure gift, 30 Hewlett-Packard computers and a whole bunch of Nike equipment. We totally remodeled our gym and got a climbing wall. It was a really positive thing for us.


This is what I come back to, no matter what you think of the decision special. Right or wrong, at least he made a bunch of kids happy.

Kstat
06-30-2011, 04:53 PM
An interesting piece, but I would not be surprised at all to find out his agent and/or PR team had a hand it in.

He didn't have to. This is the guy that gets to put "the decision" on his resume for the rest of his career trying to salvage his own reputation.

Since86
06-30-2011, 05:00 PM
Obviously everyone involved knew it was a bad idea, or atleast knew what the possible backlash would be, or they wouldn't have needed all the security that they had.

They knew what it would do to everyone involved and still did it. They purposefully acted like dicks just because they could.

BillS
06-30-2011, 05:21 PM
Hey, I've got an idea. All the LBJ supporters in this come and line up, and we can have your SOs break up with you and tell everyone how inadequate you are on national TV. If we give the money to charity, that's all OK, right?

After all, feelings are less important than charity. Pride - screw it, suck it up Cleveland, it's for charity. :bs:

vapacersfan
06-30-2011, 05:31 PM
I posted a billboard on the highway telling me wife I was leaving her, I just cannot figure out why she is being so bitter. I mean, its not like I explained how inadequate she was

LadiesfromSection220
06-30-2011, 06:01 PM
I just find it ironic that LBJ has a business manager named "Maverick".

90'sNBARocked
06-30-2011, 06:32 PM
This is really cool. I have a different look on the whole situation and makes me see LeBron in a little better light

no green

vapacersfan
06-30-2011, 08:18 PM
PS. I wish LeBron would have used the "My owner is abusing me" defense.

Would have been pure gold

Basketball Fan
06-30-2011, 09:39 PM
It will live as an epic PR fail for LeBron but one of the best things to happen to the NBA because a villain was created and helped bring back some popularity for the NBA that it was missing for quite some time.

Of course now they are deciding to lockout just when the casual fan was actually interested.

"The Decision" special was beyond stupid of Lebron to do.

But I had no issue with his actual decision which always seemed to be what the criticism stemmed from at least from the legends.. I'd never leave to go join another star... well coming from MJ that actually seemed truthful but Magic and Bird not so much they were drafted into teams that made it possible.

I didn't recall any of them saying they hated the Decision special(besides Barkley of course) which I found ironic.

ndcoltsnpacers
06-30-2011, 09:58 PM
Personally, I support LeBron's Decision to leave our division. Glad Cleveland can go back to being mediocre-bad for the next 15-20 years. Thank you LeBron.

Bird Fan
06-30-2011, 10:17 PM
Interesting read. Not really a fluff piece and not bashing him either. Just some insight on what went down.

Pacersalltheway10
07-01-2011, 12:21 AM
It will live as an epic PR fail for LeBron but one of the best things to happen to the NBA because a villain was created and helped bring back some popularity for the NBA that it was missing for quite some time.

Of course now they are deciding to lockout just when the casual fan was actually interested.

"The Decision" special was beyond stupid of Lebron to do.

But I had no issue with his actual decision which always seemed to be what the criticism stemmed from at least from the legends.. I'd never leave to go join another star... well coming from MJ that actually seemed truthful but Magic and Bird not so much they were drafted into teams that made it possible.

I didn't recall any of them saying they hated the Decision special(besides Barkley of course) which I found ironic.
Really if it wasn't for Lebron , the Heat ,and the Decision , this lockout probably wouldn't have happened or at least wouldnt have been this bad. It's all come down to hard cap vs soft cap just to keep those superteams running. If a lockout is what has to happen to stop the superteams I'll be glad it happened. If the players win, I'll be POed.

D0NT SH0OT ME
07-01-2011, 04:13 AM
Really if it wasn't for Lebron , the Heat ,and the Decision , this lockout probably wouldn't have happened or at least wouldnt have been this bad. It's all come down to hard cap vs soft cap just to keep those superteams running. If a lockout is what has to happen to stop the superteams I'll be glad it happened. If the players win, I'll be POed.


So you're saying the main reason the lockout is taking place is because of Lebron? That's a refreshing take on the matter to say the least. I also don't think it's a stretch to assume that you believe the 2007 Celtics had no influence on the current trend of super-teams. Oh how easily the past can be forgotten.

pacer4ever
07-01-2011, 04:19 AM
So your saying the main reason the lockout is taking place is because of Lebron? That's a refreshing take on the matter to say the least. I also don't think it's a stretch to assume that you believe the 2007 Celtics had no influence on the current trend of super-teams. Oh how easily the past can be forgotten.

That happened via trade not free agency huge difference. It isn't like the big 3 in Boston planned it years in advance like the Miami big 3 did. KG and Ray Allen were traded to Boston not choosing to team up.

D0NT SH0OT ME
07-01-2011, 04:31 AM
That happened via trade not free agency huge difference. It isn't like the big 3 in Boston planned it years in advance like the Miami big 3 did. KG and Ray Allen were traded to Boston not choosing to team up.


He's talking about the affect super-teams have on cap space, and is implying that the trend is solely the result of Lebron and the Heat. I pointed out that the Celtics had a so called super-team well before the Heat did. No discussion took place as to whether they were acquired via free agency or trade as those points do not pertain to the subject.

pacer4ever
07-01-2011, 04:37 AM
He's talking about the affect super-teams have on cap space, and is implying that the trend is solely the result of Lebron and the Heat. I pointed out that the Celtics had a so called super-team well before the Heat did. No discussion took place as to whether they were acquired via free agency or trade as those points do not pertain to the subject.

well if we want to say that i mean throughout the NBA there have been super teams look at Boston in the 60s MIL in the early 70s. Lakers and Celtics in the 80s and the Bulls in the 90s and the Lakers and the Spurs in the 00s.(i kow i proably left a few teams off the list:D) I mean super teams have always been part of the game i don't think there is a way to stop it from happening via draft or trade. But Via freee agency? it has to be put to a stop.

ziplockfresh
07-01-2011, 04:51 AM
I didn't have a problem with LeBron's decision. If someone wants to play second fiddle or lead a trio of supreme talent to a title, so be it. The fact 'The Decision' donated to the Girls and Boys Club is great, but not once did LeBron speak of the club or voice his passion for the project. It was wrong to **** all over Cleveland in a one-hour special, but to not notify the public as to why, was worse.

D0NT SH0OT ME
07-01-2011, 05:13 AM
well if we want to say that i mean throughout the NBA there have been super teams look at Boston in the 60s MIL in the early 70s. Lakers and Celtics in the 80s and the Bulls in the 90s and the Lakers and the Spurs in the 00s.(i kow i proably left a few teams off the list:D) I mean super teams have always been part of the game i don't think there is a way to stop it from happening via draft or trade. But Via freee agency? it has to be put to a stop.



Why do you think the practice of acquiring "super-teams" needs to be put to a stop?

Lance George
07-01-2011, 05:33 AM
<iframe width="425" height="349" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/j3bUb72KzFA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

:laugh:

pacer4ever
07-01-2011, 05:36 AM
Why do you think the practice of acquiring "super-teams" needs to be put to a stop?

acquiring via trade or draft like OKC is doing and Boston did and all the old teams did I have no problem with. It's when Miami bought a big 3 that's where the problem lies and to a lesser extent the Lakers back when Shaq came.

Richard_Skull
07-01-2011, 05:55 AM
acquiring via trade or draft like OKC is doing and Boston did and all the old teams did I have no problem with. It's when Miami bought a big 3 that's where the problem lies and to a lesser extent the Lakers back when Shaq came.

It isn't like Miami cheated. They were the only team that set themselves up for the opportunity by clearing out all their cap space and already having one of the Big Three there (Bird rights). Miami's front office Pwned the league and every one is B****ing about it. It's one thing to hate LeBron for being a douche, but pissing all over the work Miami did is just wrong IMO.

pacer4ever
07-01-2011, 06:00 AM
It isn't like Miami cheated. They were the only team that set themselves up for the opportunity by clearing out all their cap space and already having one of the Big Three there (Bird rights). Miami's front office Pwned the league and every one is B****ing about it. It's one thing to hate LeBron for being a douche, but pissing all over the work Miami did is just wrong IMO.

They weren't the only team i mean Chicago had Rose and could add 2 max guys. I just think the system is flawed and that's why the long lockout is coming and it will hopefully make the NBA more competitive.


EDIT

but there are 6 NBA owners who have missed a full season in the NHL they own both. The owners know if they hold out the whole season the Players will cave and accept the deal the owners are offering which will prevent this. Like what happen in the NHL(which severally changed the NHL). I really expect we will miss the whole NBA season unless the players cave and accept the owners offer. (that's just my cut feeling Herb Simon and the rest of the owners can afford to hold out to get the deal they want)

Richard_Skull
07-01-2011, 06:13 AM
They weren't the only team i mean Chicago had Rose and could add 2 max guys. I just think the system is flawed and that's why the long lockout is coming and it will hopefully make the NBA more competitive.

Yea, and they added Boozer and Korver. Jumped up to the top in the East (biggest jump in the east i think). But no one throws crap their way. And thats my point. People throw crap at Miami and say that it's not fair they got to build a super team just because they despise LeBron. Same thing is probably going to happen to the Knicks because of Melo. When in truth, Donnie set them up great to become a 'super' team.

pacer4ever
07-01-2011, 06:15 AM
Yea, and they added Boozer and Korver. Jumped up to the top in the East (biggest jump in the east i think). But no one throws crap their way. And thats my point. People throw crap at Miami and say that it's not fair they got to build a super team just because they despise LeBron. Same thing is probably going to happen to the Knicks because of Melo. When in truth, Donnie set them up great to become a 'super' team.

No i just think it was unfair because i feel they planed this years ago and Miami knew and Dwade recruited them years ago and he should win GM of the year lol.

Richard_Skull
07-01-2011, 07:25 AM
No i just think it was unfair because i feel they planed this years ago and Miami knew and Dwade recruited them years ago and he should win GM of the year lol.

Hearsay. But, anyway, I guess GMs and front offices should (I believe they do that already, e.i. Melo and Amar'e in NY) factor in players who can recruit when drafting or signing free agents.

But in anycase, you still can't punish franchises for doing their job better than the majority. If it happened to us, most everyone would be singing to a different tune.

Shade
07-01-2011, 07:41 AM
Dowley: I told him why [Greenwich] made sense. It’s neutral territory, because none of us knew where LeBron was going. It was as neutral as you could get while still being convenient. We worried about doing the show in Cleveland for LeBron’s personal safety. And if we went to any of the other contending cities, people would have thought he was definitely going there. And in Greenwich, I felt like we could get him in and out of town safely.

The fact that they were concerned for LeBron's safety as a result of this decision should have been a huge red flag that it was a bad idea from the beginning.

ECKrueger
07-01-2011, 11:33 AM
They would have been concerned no matter what. Cleveland would still be sour without the show.

vapacersfan
07-01-2011, 11:46 AM
They would have been concerned no matter what. Cleveland would still be sour without the show.

Sour? Yes But I think it would have been on a much smaller scale

ECKrueger
07-01-2011, 12:02 PM
Eh, probably somewhat, but they are not mad at the show, they are mad he left.

vapacersfan
07-01-2011, 12:03 PM
Eh, probably somewhat, but they are not mad at the show, they are mad he left.

That is where I disagree.

I think the fanatics would be mad he left, but I think most people were pissed that the show happened.

ECKrueger
07-01-2011, 12:08 PM
You know he still would have given interviews if he didn't do the special, and those would have been playing for a hour on sportscenter too. Or they would have had coverage for a hour or something. I believe they would have been mad no matter what.

redfoster
07-01-2011, 12:43 PM
You are right that they would have been upset either way, but I believe that many fans think that LeBron was rubbing their faces in it by doing a special that was so widely marketed. An hour of coverage on SportsCenter with pundits talking about the move is a lot different than the man himself creating a one-hour TV show to announce it.

Honestly, though, think whatever you want. It really doesn't matter. People were pissed, blah blah blah, whatever. That sums up my feelings.

Hicks
07-01-2011, 12:46 PM
Why do you think the practice of acquiring "super-teams" needs to be put to a stop?

In theory I don't, but if you get too many super teams, what the hell are we supposed to do with the other 20 teams left with nothing to do but get their brains bashed in?

RLeWorm
07-01-2011, 12:48 PM
i wish Lebron was on this team, its him against the world, just like the Pacers.

Since86
07-01-2011, 12:55 PM
You know he still would have given interviews if he didn't do the special, and those would have been playing for a hour on sportscenter too. Or they would have had coverage for a hour or something. I believe they would have been mad no matter what.

Like other's have pointed out, it's like telling your wife you're divorcing her by taking out a billboard ad.

It's bad taste. There's no way you can spin it not to be.

No one is saying that he didn't have the "right" to do it. Or the thought that it would raise money for a charity wasn't a good cause.

Yes, there would still have been people pissed off at him. People from Chicago, Cleveland, New York, and all the other people rooting for a team he turned down.

But instead of having a select few upset, he pissed off pretty much the entire NBA fanbase, or atleast mostly all of them outside of LeBron and Miami Heat fans.

People hire PR firms to "minimize" damage for a reason.

Since86
07-01-2011, 12:56 PM
I don't blame Miami for playing within the rules for creating a super team. I blame the NBA for having the rules in place that allows it to happen, which is another reason, IMHO, the NBA wants to change the current system.

Pacersalltheway10
07-01-2011, 01:03 PM
So you're saying the main reason the lockout is taking place is because of Lebron? That's a refreshing take on the matter to say the least. I also don't think it's a stretch to assume that you believe the 2007 Celtics had no influence on the current trend of super-teams. Oh how easily the past can be forgotten.

No I'm saying that if the current league structure wouldnt have allowed Lebron to do all this, the lockout wouldnt have been that bad. Lebron or the Heat are not the direct cause, the NBA regulations on the soft cap are.

Pacersalltheway10
07-01-2011, 01:08 PM
i wish Lebron was on this team, its him against the world, just like the Pacers.

I don't.

Pacersalltheway10
07-01-2011, 01:24 PM
The creation of superteams via free agancy or holding your team hostage (Carmelo) is what's wrong with the NBA. Why do superteams need to be stopped??? What the :censored: are we supposed to do with the other 25 teams in the league. I can honestly tell you that if nothing changes through this lockout and players are still allowed to form superteams, I'm done with the NBA. The league is becoming garbage. The Pacers can't create superteams (via free agency) because no one wants to come here.


Lebrons a big :censored: . The way he handled this was just stupid. The Decision doent have any effect on the lockout, but it was just a stupid decision to have the "Decison". I'm getting sick of the word decsion.

I can't believe there are people who worship his :censored:.

Stern's not the cause of this lockout either, but the way he handles this league is garbage. You don't have to be a rocket scientst to see that he loves the big markets a whole lot more than he loves smaller ones. The whole scandla with the refs is mind blowing too. He called that one referee who bet on the games ( I cant remember his name) "The most accurate official in the league". and he still kept Bavetta after he also had a part in the scandal.

Shade
07-01-2011, 01:25 PM
i wish Lebron was on this team, its him against the world, just like the Pacers.

We already have plenty of players who don't show up in crunch time.

makaveli
07-01-2011, 02:06 PM
So Lebron didn't have time to take a picture or sign an autograph for all those kids who sat there as set dressing for a couple of hours but he had plenty of time to go back to some dudes house and pop bottles with Kanye?

Richard_Skull
07-02-2011, 05:09 PM
No I'm saying that if the current league structure wouldnt have allowed Lebron to do all this, the lockout wouldnt have been that bad. Lebron or the Heat are not the direct cause, the NBA regulations on the soft cap are.

Miami is under the cap. Even if there was a hard cap, they could've done what they did. Although, it would be harder to maintain, but if there was a hard cap they (Big Three) would've just taken less money. (Which wouldn't be a problem because a hard cap will lower all money)

BlueNGold
07-04-2011, 02:54 PM
The problem I have with "the decision" is the effect it has on fair competition. While their are some barriers, some other superstar might decide to go to Miami so they can dominate for a decade. Imagine the Heat with a true dominant force in the paint like Dwight Howard. Their single weakness would be filled and they truly would become unstoppable. There would be no point watching it because the end result would already be decided.