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View Full Version : Owners, players have great divide to bridge



90'sNBARocked
06-16-2011, 09:57 AM
http://www.indystar.com/article/20110616/SPORTS04/106160445/NBA-owners-players-great-divide-bridge?odyssey=tab|topnews|text|Sports


The end of the Finals could mean no more NBA games for a long time unless the owners and players come to an accord on a new collective bargaining agreement.

The current CBA expires June 30, so the clock is ticking louder for the sides to hammer out a deal. If there's a work stoppage and it's anything like the 1998-99 lockout, when the season was shortened by 32 games, it would ruin the momentum this exciting postseason created.

To this point, the sides haven't made much progress in hammering out a deal.

Here are the main issues that will need to be resolved:

Basketball-related income

Under the current system, players receive 57 percent of the basketball-related income (BRI). It's projected to be about $3.8 billion this year.

Owners' view: The NBA says 22 of 30 teams are losing money, so owners want BRI cut by about $900 million and the remaining split reduced to 50-50. They say the players get a percentage of gross revenue, but the owners want to move to a net system.

Players' view: They like the current model and dispute that owners are losing that much money with TV ratings, merchandise sales and the digital businesses up. The players have proposed credits for arena-related work and a less reduced share of BRI.

Hard salary cap

There is a push to institute a hard salary cap, eliminate exceptions and roll back salaries. There is currently a soft cap and teams can exceed it using various exceptions, but face luxury-tax penalties.

Owners: Hoping to create competitive balance, they want the current $58 million cap cut to about $45 million and phased in over a couple of years. To keep current rosters intact, the owners have proposed rollbacks of players' salaries.

Players: A hard cap won't affect competitive balance, and since they have signed contracts, the players are steadfastly opposed to their current salaries being rolled back or cut. They're against losing exceptions, such as the midlevel, bi-annual and minimum salary.

Guaranteed contracts

Most NBA contracts are fully guaranteed.

Owners: They can shorten or get out of contractual obligations, which also could make players prove they deserve their full salary. Should players be cut, the owners have proposed guaranteeing a certain percentage based on the individual's salary.

Players: They have offered a reduction in the guarantee, but not to the percentages the owners proposed. The players also feel if there is a hard cap, there is no need to eliminate guarantees.

Contract details

Players can sign for up to six years with 10.5 percent raises with their current teams, and five years with 8 percent raises if they switch teams.

Owners: They want maximum four-year deals with roughly 3 percent raises if a player re-signs, and three-year pacts with about 2 percent raises if a player leaves.

Players: Why reduce contract lengths if the guarantees are reduced and vice versa? The NBA's maximum length for a contract is the shortest in pro sports, and the 10.5 and 8 percent raises are maximums -- teams don't have to give the max. In many of these proposals, the players say the owners are trying to protect themselves from themselves.

Other issues . . .

Including a change in the minimum age of players, the length of rookie contracts and a more flexible trading system.

Overall, the owners want to overhaul and undo what has been in place and the players want something similar to the current system.

Roaming Gnome
06-16-2011, 12:05 PM
No need to put out an NBA schedule in July/August... It's fairly evident that would just be an exercise in futility.

Jan, 2012
:nba: :nba:
Catch it!!!

90'sNBARocked
06-16-2011, 12:53 PM
No need to put out an NBA schedule in July/August... It's fairly evident that would just be an exercise in futility.

Jan, 2012
:nba: :nba:
Catch it!!!

I know man. On a good note, looks like I will be only watching sport on Sunday (assuming NFL gets it together)

wifey should be happy

more freakin shoppin time :censored::censored::censored:

Pacersalltheway10
06-19-2011, 04:56 PM
If a say 55 million hard cap come in place, what happens to teams like the Heat, Lakers, and Celtics? Would they immediately have to trade players or release them to get under 55 million?

So for example would Miami be forced to trade Bosh for say a young player on a rookie contract or picks?

If this is the case could the Pacers cash in?

Pacer Fan
06-19-2011, 11:22 PM
If a say 55 million hard cap come in place, what happens to teams like the Heat, Lakers, and Celtics? Would they immediately have to trade players or release them to get under 55 million?

So for example would Miami be forced to trade Bosh for say a young player on a rookie contract or picks?

If this is the case could the Pacers cash in?

It tells you in the bold type under hard salary cap.

Owners: Hoping to create competitive balance, they want the current $58 million cap cut to about $45 million and phased in over a couple of years. To keep current rosters intact, the owners have proposed rollbacks of players' salaries.

Hicks
06-19-2011, 11:28 PM
I think a hard cap makes more sense if it's closer to where the current luxury tax line is.

And wherever it ends up being (assuming it's there at all), I'm thinking instead of letting teams cut a player or players, they'll just be grandfathered in, only being allowed to make trades which lower their salary and for contracts no longer in years than the ones going out (or perhaps they must be shorter?), and they are not allowed to sign players (except for draft picks) until they are back under the cap.