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View Full Version : What Lebron James and the Miami Heat teach about teamwork



Basketball Fan
04-26-2011, 03:11 PM
Its the cover story for Fast Company Magazine its a 5 page article so I'll just copy and past some of it.

http://www.fastcompany.com/magazine/155/the-worlds-greatest-chemistry-experiment.html?page=0%2C0




Forget for a moment that this has anything to do with basketball. Forget about sports altogether. What LeBron and company are attempting to do applies to any organization that's serious about winning. A year ago, James, Wade, and Bosh were the top dogs -- the leading scorers -- on their respective teams. Today, they're divvying up the sirloin scraps, at far less pay, in search of one prize: a championship. Yes, they've been derided for conspiring to give Miami a huge leg up at the expense of small-market teams (namely James's former employer in Cleveland and Bosh's in Toronto), but their mutual sacrifice is a resounding vote for teamwork. Teamwork among superstars. It's a huge bet that, in the end, talent will prevail.

This is a strategy that's on the rise these days. Look at Silicon Valley. Which tech company, when given the chance, doesn't raid the talent pool, stocking up on the world's best execs and engineers in the hopes of racing past the competition? Late last year, Mark Zuckerberg personally persuaded Lars Rasmussen, the cocreator of Google Maps, to join a host of elite ex-colleagues at Facebook. If ESPN anchor Stuart Scott were to cover the business universe, he would have summed up the acquisition in a word: Boo-yah!

Since86
04-26-2011, 03:14 PM
For various reasons, sports competition and industry competition are two completely seperate things, and should remain seperate.

Sparhawk
04-26-2011, 03:24 PM
For various reasons, sports competition and industry competition are two completely seperate things, and should remain seperate.

Unless it teaches CEOs to get paid a bit less and the peons getting more and better benefits, I have no clue how that writer came to compare the two.

I'm sure you could compare just about anything whether they are related or not, but you have to ask yourself if it really makes sense to do so.

Plus this sounds more like businesses should be merging to save costs and increase revenue. Not sure how that helps drive creation; plus competition is a damn good thing.

Since86
04-26-2011, 03:34 PM
Unless it teaches CEOs to get paid a bit less and the peons getting more and better benefits, I have no clue how that writer came to compare the two.

That's not even happening in Miami though. They filled out their roster with league minimum players.

Whiskeyjim
04-26-2011, 03:58 PM
For various reasons, sports competition and industry competition are two completely seperate things, and should remain seperate.could you expound on that? i'm not following.

Since86
04-26-2011, 04:06 PM
could you expound on that? i'm not following.

Because one is centered around providing entertainment, while the other is providing a product/service to start off with.

There's a reason why the US government isn't stepping in and handing the Simons a bailout and telling the country that the NBA is "too big to fail."

In the grand scheme of things, sports aren't important. They're entertainment, pure and simple.

Sure, they're both competition, but so is playing wiffleball.

EDIT: And the NBA is entertainment because it's "best" are spread around. IF all the best were on one team, then it wouldn't be very entertaining. It would be the Harlem Globetrotters and the Washington Generals, and they can barely sell out high school gyms.

asmithxc
04-26-2011, 04:06 PM
That's not even happening in Miami though. They filled out their roster with league minimum players.

Really, the opposite is happening.

Insofar as you can compare it to business, it would be like a company paying the senior management huge money and undercutting market price for all their employees.

Thoreau87
04-26-2011, 04:36 PM
For various reasons, sports competition and industry competition are two completely seperate things, and should remain seperate.

Sports analogies work great in business. Why can't they work the other way around?

While it's not perfect, it nonetheless fits. James and Bosh, both captains (CEO's), decided to sacrifice money and notoriety to play for a new team (business) that gave them the best chance to achieve the highest level of success in their sport (industry).

CEO's ask themselves this very question. Should I get the most out of my company (team) or should I take my talent to the industry leader (in the big three's case a realistic NBA dynasty) and let my baby go (the dream of winning a title for the team that drafted you)?

Again, not perfect, but not worth saying they should remain separate.

Thoreau87
04-26-2011, 04:45 PM
Because one is centered around providing entertainment, while the other is providing a product/service to start off with...

...In the grand scheme of things, sports aren't important. They're entertainment, pure and simple.

1. Entertainment is a service
2. Why does the government get involved if sports aren't important?
NBA: FBI investigation on Donaghy
NFL: Just yesterday Federal Judge Susan Nelson's ruling against the owners.
MLB: Congressional hearings about steroids.

Just accept the analogy :)

King Tuts Tomb
04-26-2011, 05:46 PM
In the grand scheme of things, sports aren't important. They're entertainment, pure and simple.


I think we all know this isn't true. For whatever reason, sports in American society play a far larger role than "entertainment." The problem a lot of fans (and sportswriters) have is that sports are at the same time so inconsequential and so important.

Sports are probably the most intensive and important part of contemporary American culture, far surpassing literature, movies and maybe music. Not saying it's a good or bad thing, just reality.

Whiskeyjim
04-26-2011, 06:28 PM
Because one is centered around providing entertainment, while the other is providing a product/service to start off with.

There's a reason why the US government isn't stepping in and handing the Simons a bailout and telling the country that the NBA is "too big to fail."

In the grand scheme of things, sports aren't important. They're entertainment, pure and simple.

Sure, they're both competition, but so is playing wiffleball.

EDIT: And the NBA is entertainment because it's "best" are spread around. IF all the best were on one team, then it wouldn't be very entertaining. It would be the Harlem Globetrotters and the Washington Generals, and they can barely sell out high school gyms.Not trying to be dense or willfully argumentative.

But I still don't catch the relevance of 'entertainment.'

In business and sport, people in teams are trying desperately to win against their competition and succeed. In both, there is both an individual and team component. And to the extent they win, they make the whole sport and industry better through excellence and innovation.

In business and sport, team members are generally paid according to their perceived worth to the team, although in both areas, it is an inexact 'science.'

In business and sport, the government often meddles rather inconsistently and confusingly.

In business and sport, all team members are really quite serious about it regardless of the end goal, whether it be winning a championship, making a better cheesy, or designing a new car.

And in both, being a better player begins and is centered around self-preparation, self-improvement and emotional maturity.

What am I missing?

Since86
04-27-2011, 12:24 PM
I don't know what is so complicated about the issue.

Sports competition has rules set up to ensure a fair play. That's not the case with business. Sure, there are laws and regulations, but those are for legal purposes so people don't steal, commit fraud, etc.

In sports, they cap the salary for each team and punish them for going over said cap. In business, if a company wants to spend a billion dollars on the salary of just two people, they can, and there's nothing against the law to do it.

And while I agree entertainment is a service, it's a non-esstential service. It's not like providing healthcare. If the NBA locks out next season, people will replace it with something. They might not be happy, but it's not like people are going to do without.



There's a reason why some business men don't last in the NBA. It's not a typical business, and can't be ran the same way. The owner of Starbucks, who bought the Supersonics found out pretty quickly that the business world and the sports world are two completely different things.

There is example after example of millionaire/billionaire owners that are great businessmen who try and run a team and fail. There's a reason why.....

Everything you've said Jim is true. But just because they have similiarities doesn't mean they're one in the same. A snail and a human share traits as well, but we are two completely different species and should be treated as such.

Trader Joe
04-27-2011, 02:48 PM
Funniest thing said in the article...that Toronto is a small market. HILARIOUS.