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View Full Version : Worst r.season record ever?



Hicks
08-23-2004, 09:05 PM
I was trying to find out, but I'll just ask: What team had the worst regular-season record ever?

Obviously the Bulls have the BEST regular-season record ever at 72-10 (which is just sick), but I don't know what the worst it. I want to say I read it was 11 or 13 wins, but I'm not sure.

SoupIsGood
08-23-2004, 09:13 PM
I think it was 9, but I'm not sure.

Zesty
08-23-2004, 09:17 PM
The 72-73 Philadelphia 76ers went 9-73. Worst ever.

Kegboy
08-23-2004, 09:17 PM
76ers, I believe '72 or '73:

9-73 :o

I'm sure dipper can fill us in. All I know is Fred Carter was on it.

Hicks
08-23-2004, 09:18 PM
9 wins?? :o Ouch.

Kegboy
08-23-2004, 09:21 PM
http://www.nba.com/sixers/history/index_new.html#1972-76


The 1972-73 Sixers set an NBA record for futility, finishing 9-73 for the year. The team's ineptitude stemmed from many factors-Cunningham had fled to the ABA, trades had not been favorable, and draft choices had been busts. Carter, who would later coach the team, was the top scorer (20.0 ppg) on a miserable roster that shuffled players in and out but never came close to a winning formula. Freddie Boyd, Manny Leaks, and Leroy Ellis were other starters. Rookie coach Roy Rubin didn't last past his 4-47 start, and his replacement, player-coach Kevin Loughery, didn't fare much better. The team set the standard by which bad NBA teams would be judged for years to come.


Of course, just 3 years later they stole Dr. J from NJ and almost beat Walton and Dr. Jack for the trophy the next year. Not to shabby of a turnaround.

SoupIsGood
08-23-2004, 09:21 PM
Many of those highly paid ESPN anaylsts were predicting utah would break that record this year. Boy, were they wrong.

Kegboy
08-23-2004, 09:23 PM
http://www.nba.com/sixers/history/index_new.html#1972-76


The 1972-73 Sixers set an NBA record for futility, finishing 9-73 for the year. The team's ineptitude stemmed from many factors-Cunningham had fled to the ABA, trades had not been favorable, and draft choices had been busts. Carter, who would later coach the team, was the top scorer (20.0 ppg) on a miserable roster that shuffled players in and out but never came close to a winning formula. Freddie Boyd, Manny Leaks, and Leroy Ellis were other starters. Rookie coach Roy Rubin didn't last past his 4-47 start, and his replacement, player-coach Kevin Loughery, didn't fare much better. The team set the standard by which bad NBA teams would be judged for years to come.


Of course, 3 years later they stole Dr. J from NJ, and the next year only Walton and Dr. Jack kept them from taking home the trophy. As turnarounds go, that's not to shabby.

beast23
08-23-2004, 11:56 PM
The heck with Dr. J. They also landed McGinnis the year before.

SoupIsGood
08-24-2004, 08:31 AM
What was their record the season after the 9 wins?

dipperdunk
08-24-2004, 09:01 AM
Yeah, that dubious distinction still belongs to the 76ers. :laugh: That is what you get when you trade Wilt for a bag of doritos.

They bounced back with Doc and McGinnis. They had a great front office in the late 70's/early 80's. They added some serious talent those years in the drafts and with some great trades. I don't remember much about the McGinnis teams I started watching them in 1979 when I was about 5 when Cunningham was already the coach and McGinnis was already gone. My old man who has been watching the 76ers since they were called the Warriors always makes sure to remind that McGinnis was a terrific player. ;)