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View Full Version : James Harrison is a scumbag and a moron



Trader Joe
10-19-2010, 10:06 AM
http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=5699976

His quotes about his concussion causing hits on Sunday pretty much speak for themselves. What a ****ing idiot.


"I thought Cribbs was asleep," Harrison said. "A hit like that geeks you up, especially when you find out the guy is not really hurt, he's just sleeping. He's knocked out but he's going to be OK."

Concussions are not a joke. When will people realize this? What an ignorant jackass.

duke dynamite
10-19-2010, 11:27 AM
Dooooouche.

SoupIsGood
10-19-2010, 01:42 PM
The lack of concern most alpha-male types have for concussions and other brain injuries has always struck me as weird. W/o their brain they're not going to be impressing anybody with their macho-ness.

RWB
10-19-2010, 02:01 PM
The lack of concern most alpha-male types have for concussions and other brain injuries has always struck me as weird. W/o their brain they're not going to be impressing anybody with their macho-ness.

So eating baby food through a straw is not macho? :blush: I think Harrison was probably 1 for 1 over the weekend. One dirty hit and one that's what I get paid for hit. I think he better watch his knees as some O-linemen will retaliate at some point.

naptownmenace
10-19-2010, 02:19 PM
So eating baby food through a straw is not macho? :blush: I think Harrison was probably 1 for 1 over the weekend. One dirty hit and one that's what I get paid for hit. I think he better watch his knees as some O-linemen will retaliate at some point.

Exactly my same thought. He was excited about that hit but when it happens to him (and believe me someone will go head hunting the next time he lays out one of their teammates) I have a feeling he won't be so happy about it. If he has to sit out a game without pay, that should curb his enthusiasm as well.

Mr_Smith
10-19-2010, 03:19 PM
I hope somebody cut blocks his *** and evaporates is ACL :laugh:

righteouscool
10-19-2010, 04:15 PM
From what I've seen of James Harrison, I think he is probably borderline mentally handicapped. Some of the things he's said just sound so... out of place for a grown man to say. A concussion is when someone's "just sleeping?" Sounds like something my seven year old niece would say.

Slick Pinkham
10-19-2010, 04:49 PM
his wallet is $75,000 lighter also

http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2010/10/19/nfl-fines-james-harrison-75000-dunta-robinson-50000/

Robinson fined 50G, Meriweather 50G also,

no suspensions

It seems like the suspension policy starts with the next game.

ChicagoJ
10-19-2010, 05:16 PM
Let's just put away the helmets and pads and fully convert the game into flag football.

This guy (Goodell) is going to hurt football more than Stern has hurt basketball.

As for Harrison, he's never going to be considered the smartest guy in any room. But he knows how to play football.

ChicagoJ
10-19-2010, 05:23 PM
I hope somebody cut blocks his *** and evaporates is ACL :laugh:

The irony is that the "low" hits really are the dirty plays, not the "high" hits. And in the new PFL (Pansy football league), you'll see a lot more season-ending knee injuries as players learn to aim for the knees instead of the midsection or shoulders.

Meanwhile, I dare you to try to block him with a "low" hit. His uniqueness is because he's short and can get leverage against most OLs. The taller the OT, the easier it is for him to get to the QB. But if you try to hit him with a low block and he gets around it (or over it), he might snap your QB in half. And that's about the highest compliment one can give a defensive player.

Slick Pinkham
10-19-2010, 05:34 PM
Launching yourself at a guys head is not a dirty play???

OK...

There are times when accidental helmet-to-helmet contact does occur, when a receiver ducks for example, but that was not apparent in any of the three hits that drew fines.

I have nothing against enforcing rules against helmet-to-helmet contact. For one thing, that isn't good tackling. You miss and you accomplish nothing. Whatever happened to driving through a guys numbers, midesection, or thighs and wrapping up?

My only complaint was language against "devastating hits"--- whatever that is. That seems to have gone away as an issue. Just because a hit looked like it hurt a lot and the guy doesn't get up doesn't make it illegal. If the hit was at the knees with a player already being tackled, or at the head, then it is illegal. Fine players for making illegal hits. Suspend repeat offenders. Enforcing rules like that doesn't make it flag football and doesn't make the offensive players wear dresses.

ChicagoJ
10-19-2010, 05:47 PM
That wasn't Harrison. And he led with his shoulder pad on both hits Sunday, but the offensive player wasn't standing still. Instead of missing with a whiff, he missed with the pad but connected with the helmet.

And yes, I agree, that's not good fundamentals. Hit 'em in the numbers and crush them into the turf. That's the best way to split an offensive player in half.

Mr_Smith
10-19-2010, 11:16 PM
James just got fined $75,000 for putting Cribbs to "sleep"

Trader Joe
10-19-2010, 11:18 PM
If you're a fan of good, fundamental football, you should be all for the NFL penalizing helmet to helmet hits. It will only encourage better tackling. It doesn't "pussify" the league or make them a bunch of pansies at all.

Slick Pinkham
10-20-2010, 10:09 AM
Harrison is also quite the drama queen, since he is "contemplating retirement" because of the fine.

http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2010/10/20/james-harrison-contemplates-retirement/

Trader Joe
10-20-2010, 10:21 AM
LOL.

Slick Pinkham
10-20-2010, 10:56 AM
Isn't he also the player who skipped the team visit to the White House, with his reason being that the only reason they were even invited was because they won the Super Bowl, and that probably Arizona would have been invited if they had won instead?

real...sharp...cookie...

Hicks
10-20-2010, 12:25 PM
To me being upset about prohibiting concussion-inducing hits is a little bit like complaining that we don't still have gladiators killing each other. Priorities.

Since86
10-20-2010, 12:44 PM
That wasn't Harrison.

So he only got fined for dumb comments? That makes sense.

The problem is you can't judge intent. But when you have someone like James Harrison, you clearly understand he's out to hurt people, and if that means paralyzing him, then that looks like it's okay.

Jay, he said that concussions were "headaches" (now we know who that one poster was) and that Cribbs looked like he was asleep. And you're defending that?

I know you lose common sense when dealing with Pitt, but come on, you're better than that.

Calling Harrison an idiot doesn't lower your fandom status.

Trader Joe
10-20-2010, 01:42 PM
He skipped practice today while contemplating his retirement.

Is this real life?

Trader Joe
10-20-2010, 02:03 PM
Since86, J was saying that Harrison didn't launch himself at anyone helmet first which Slick (I still miss you're old name :() was saying he did.

That was Merriweather and I'm surprised he didn't get the biggest fine. His hit was flat out vomit inducing. Even Belichik was appalled by it.

Since86
10-20-2010, 02:14 PM
I know what Jay is saying. I'm saying in the eyes of the league, he's wrong.


Steelers linebacker James Harrison (http://www.rotoworld.com/content/playerpages/player_main.aspx?sport=NFL&id=665) has been fined $75,000 for a hit on Browns receiver Mohamed Massaquoi (http://www.rotoworld.com/content/playerpages/player_main.aspx?sport=NFL&id=5233),

Obviously, he should have been flagged on the play, as the NFL has determined it wasn't a legal hit.

Trader Joe
10-20-2010, 02:17 PM
Well, J's arguing about the way that Harrison's helmet approached Massaquoi's I think. As in it was a an accident or something. I think Harrison's own comments pretty much put that to rest though.

ChicagoJ
10-20-2010, 02:30 PM
So he only got fined for dumb comments? That makes sense.

The problem is you can't judge intent. But when you have someone like James Harrison, you clearly understand he's out to hurt people, and if that means paralyzing him, then that looks like it's okay.

Jay, he said that concussions were "headaches" (now we know who that one poster was) and that Cribbs looked like he was asleep. And you're defending that?

I know you lose common sense when dealing with Pitt, but come on, you're better than that.

Calling Harrison an idiot doesn't lower your fandom status.

My comments aren't because I'm a fan of the Steelers. My comments are because I'm a fan of hard-hitting, smashmouth football. The Steelers also happen to play that style. But I would be defending Ray Lewis or the guys on Baltimore if this happened to them as well, even though they're our chief rivalry.

This hasn't come out in the articles, but James and Joshua Cribbs are very good friend from their days together at Kent State.

I don't think James expresses himself very well, which is why he usually does not talk to the press. His comments were stupid, certainly. I've not attempted to defend his comments as they pertain to concussions.

His play was deemed to be "dangerous", but the league made sure they didn't call it an "illegal" hit because it was within the rules. This is the very first time in football history that "dangerous" has become a fineable event.

Was it a "high" hit? Yes.

But James didn't launch or leave his feet. Had Massaquoi not ducked his head, James would have put his shoulderpad in Massaquoi's body. Maybe Massaquoi should be fined for not standing up straight and therefore increasing the chance of a getting his bell rung? This play happened at full speed. That's about as reasonable as fining the defensive player because he didn't hit a moving target at the exact right place.

High speed collisions happen. That is the very game of football. And that's why there was no flag on the play and why the league is calling his play "dangerous" but not calling it "illegal". They're making an example out of him because he hits hard.

And frankly, if I were an offensive player I'd rather be hit by Harrison's helmet than his shoulder pads.

If Massaquoi ducked his head at a different angle, we would have had a shoulder pad-to-helmet hit that would have been much, much more dangerous. Because then we're talking about a potential spinal cord injury instead of a concussion.

Concussions are a big deal. We should take those injuries seriously.

But I'm still more worried about ruptured knees and ruptured spinal cords than I am worried about concussions.

Every defensive player intends to hurt the player they are tackling. This is a game of full-speed collisions. That's why they wear pads. As Mike Tomlin says every week, the game is usually won by whichever team is more violent. That's elementary football, and it has been that way for 100+ years.

Slick Pinkham
10-20-2010, 02:38 PM
That was Merriweather and I'm surprised he didn't get the biggest fine. His hit was flat out vomit inducing. Even Belichik was appalled by it.

Harrison got the bigger fine because he was already fined before:

Ray Anderson, the NFL's vice president of football operations, explained that Harrison received a higher fine because he is a repeat offender. Harrison was fined $5,000 for driving Titans quarterback Vince Young to the ground on Sept. 19 at Tennessee.

http://blogblitz.nfl.com/pittsburgh-steelers/entry/james_harrison_s_recent_hits

Trader Joe
10-20-2010, 02:44 PM
Sorry J, but I'm much more concerned about concussions than I am ruptured knees.

Slick Pinkham
10-20-2010, 02:51 PM
His play was deemed to be "dangerous", but the league made sure they didn't call it an "illegal" hit because it was within the rules.

What they called all three incidents, in the official NFL press release:

"'flagrant violations of player safety rules"

They (the NFL) believe the hits were illegal and their press release goes into great detail to describe exactly why the Harrison hit was, in fact, illegal:

"In the second quarter of Pittsburgh's game against Cleveland, Harrison unnecessarily struck a defenseless receiver in the head and neck area. That action violated Rule 12, Section 2, Article 8 (g) of the NFL Official Playing Rules, which states that it is unnecessary roughness if the initial force of the contact by a defender's helmet, forearm, or shoulder is to the head or neck area of a defenseless receiver who is catching or attempting to catch a pass. Anderson added that the action also violated Rule 12, Section 2, Article 8 (h) of the NFL Official Playing Rules, which states that if a receiver has completed a catch and has not had time to protect himself, a defensive player is prohibited from launching (springing forward and upward) into him in a way that causes the defensive player's helmet, facemask, shoulder, or forearm to forcibly strike the receiver's head or neck area -- even if the initial contact of the defender's helmet, facemask, shoulder, or forearm is lower than the receiver's neck."

http://prod.www.nfl.com/news/story/09000d5d81b75043/printable/nfl-fines-three-players-a-total-of-175k-for-flagrant-violations

Since86
10-20-2010, 02:54 PM
And Jay, no player should be leading with his helmet, regardless of the location.

I watched Dante Love laying montionless on the IU sideline from two players lowering their helmets. It wasn't even a "hard" hit, but both lowered their helmets well below shoulder level and it cost Dante a shot in the NFL. I think he could have most definately made it as a Steve Smith type receiver.

You're trivalizing a very serious issue, not only just concussions, but head injuries in general that the NFL has to deal with. They're going to err on the side of caution, because no one wants to see their players carted off the field and never be able to put on pads.

If that makes it too "sissy" for you, or whatever you want to call it, then I suggest rugby. (although you'll find that rugby has a rule that you cannot hit above the shoulders for ANY reason.)

vapacersfan
10-20-2010, 05:16 PM
I have two thoughts.

<O:p</O:p1. I just watched the Philly play (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dYL5ltBZZlg&feature=player_embedded) I think it is REALLY hard to penalize guys for hits to a defenseless player. These are guys who are told to go on instinct, and now, at full speed, you want them to stop and think “Should I hit him”? Now I totally get there are times when you can pull back, but a bang bang play like that. I get you are trying to protect players, but I also think that is a really tough decision.
<O:p
2. My second thought. There is NEVER, NEVER a excuse for a helmet to helmet hit. People can make excuses for players not speaking well (or just being plain stupid) but bottom line is it is not a good football move. Hit the man in his numbers, and drive through him. No need to aim for the head…….unless you are trying to cause injury. If that is the case, you are a scumbag and you should not be playing football

<O:p</O:p
Last thing. As a theatre major, it is comical seeing the whole “Woe is me, I am going to retire because I got in trouble” STFU. You should have been suspended, and not just for one game, IMHO.

vapacersfan
10-20-2010, 05:20 PM
This is from Bang, the gentleman who makes the Bang NFL cartoons. I stongly agree with this



That is some bull**** on Dunta Robinson. It was shoulder to chest, helmet to helmet was incidental.
As far as "defenseless receiver" ,,, give me a break. If Robinson pulls up, Jackson catches the ball. Then the media wonders why he pulls up, blah blah blah.

That was a clean football play, a good hit that separated the receiver from the ball. Truth be told, every receiver is defenseless when he is in the act of catching a ball.

The NFL needs to recognize that at it's very base element, football is a brutal sport, a sport of collisions.
"It's not a contact sport. It's a collision sport." I believe that was Vince Lombardi who said that. I wonder how he'd feel about all this?
They cannot legislate it to be much more safe than it is without changing the essence of the game.
They're killing the sport by erasing what makes the sport what it is.

They're makiing it impossible to play defense,

~Bang

ChicagoJ
10-20-2010, 05:28 PM
But you're missing the point. He didn't lead with his helmet on either play. He led with the shoulder pad and missed because the offensive player was still trying to control the football. But he didn't miss with a "whiff", he missed the pad and connected with the helmet.

Its unfortunate that NFL defensive players are not trying to tackle stationary sleds and tackling dummies. They're trying to tackle moving targets. Mistakes happen. That's what this is (in Harrison's case). Not sure that the Merriweather situation is the same.

I'm not defending helmet-on-helmet. I'm saying that at full speed, its often an accident, not an intentional, dirty play.

I'm not trivializing concussions, but from what I've read more NFL players are in deed worried about ACL ruptures and spinal cord ruptures than concussions. And I'd agree. A single concussion will bother you for a little while. A single ruptured ACL might end your career, and the NFL doesn't have guaranteed contracts. A single ruptured spinal cord will leave you paralyzed for life.

A series of concussions - yes, that's a really big deal. What's the magic number?

ChicagoJ
10-20-2010, 05:42 PM
What they called all three incidents, in the official NFL press release:

"'flagrant violations of player safety rules"

They (the NFL) believe the hits were illegal and their press release goes into great detail to describe exactly why the Harrison hit was, in fact, illegal:

"In the second quarter of Pittsburgh's game against Cleveland, Harrison unnecessarily struck a defenseless receiver in the head and neck area. That action violated Rule 12, Section 2, Article 8 (g) of the NFL Official Playing Rules, which states that it is unnecessary roughness if the initial force of the contact by a defender's helmet, forearm, or shoulder is to the head or neck area of a defenseless receiver who is catching or attempting to catch a pass. Anderson added that the action also violated Rule 12, Section 2, Article 8 (h) of the NFL Official Playing Rules, which states that if a receiver has completed a catch and has not had time to protect himself, a defensive player is prohibited from launching (springing forward and upward) into him in a way that causes the defensive player's helmet, facemask, shoulder, or forearm to forcibly strike the receiver's head or neck area -- even if the initial contact of the defender's helmet, facemask, shoulder, or forearm is lower than the receiver's neck."

http://prod.www.nfl.com/news/story/09000d5d81b75043/printable/nfl-fines-three-players-a-total-of-175k-for-flagrant-violations

Thanks. I had not seen that, and the AP articles I've seen didn't pick it up.

I disagree with the second part. He didn't launch himself and if the receiver had caught, not bobbled, the ball he likely would have done exactly what everyone (including me) is advocating - he would have stuck his shoulder pad right in the numbers at just the right time. But in effort to still catch a bobbled ball, the reciever didn't end up where James was aiming.

But the moral of the story is this: defenders should stop pursuing or tackling precious little receivers until the receiver has caught the ball, put two feet down, and made a football move because the NFL wants to market completed passes, not great hitting.

PS, for those that always complain about how ESPN changed thier tune the day following the Palace brawl, it should be noted that the CBS announcers did not think either of Harrison's hit deserved a flag. They were surprised there was a flag thrown on the second play, but then the official explained that it was a delay-of-game because one of the Browns players kicked the ball out of bounds thinking that Harrison forced a fumble off a completed pass.

And again, had he not been bobbling the ball, he probably would have gotten both feet down before James clobbered him. But he didn't, and that's why we are having this conversation today.

So I'm not sure what the television media is making out of these plays (as I haven't had a television on since I finished watching that game on my TiVo Sunday night), but I suspect its a change-of-opinion like Pacers fans have seen before.

Slick Pinkham
10-20-2010, 05:43 PM
According to NFL Executive Vice President of Football Operations Ray Anderson, he also "launched" meaning springing forward and upward into the neck area.

You are correct in that he is not accused, in that NFL memo anyway, of "leading" the helmet but he is still accused of breaking two specific rules- head/neck contact on a defenseless receiver (i.e. one in the process of catching ot attempting to catch a pass, rather than acting as a runner after the catch) and launching.


edit--- I just saw that you addressed this issue as I was typing

Slick Pinkham
10-20-2010, 05:48 PM
No, the moral of the story is this: defenders should stop tackling receivers in the neck/head area until the receiver has caught the ball, put two feet down, and made a football move,

because the NFL wants to begin penalizing more severely players who break a rule that has been on the books for quite some time but that players and coaches alike never paid any attention to, because the fines ($5,000 or so in the past) were so incredibly inconsequential.

ChicagoJ
10-20-2010, 05:51 PM
Sidebar,

This is truly ironic...




NFL stops selling photos of Harrison's illegal hit
Wednesday, October 20, 2010
The Associated Press


NEW YORK (AP) -- The NFL has taken down photos that were for sale of illegal hits that earned players large fines.


The league said Wednesday an outside vendor used an automated process to post pictures online for fans to buy, but the system would be changed to ensure photos of illegal hits were not available.


Three defensive players were fined at least $50,000 each Tuesday after a series of violent hits in Sunday's games raised concerns that the NFL's disciplinary policy wasn't doing enough to prevent head injuries. The league now plans to start suspending players for particularly dangerous hits.


Steelers linebacker James Harrison, fined $75,000, criticized the photos' presence in a radio interview Wednesday morning, saying "I guess they want to get their money on the front end and the back end."


The NFL says: "We regret the mistake."
<!-- AP Credit -->
Copyright<SCRIPT type=text/javascript>document.write(new Date().getFullYear());</SCRIPT> 20102010 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.


Steelers linebacker James Harrison, fined $75,000, criticized the photos' presence in a radio interview Wednesday morning, saying "I guess they want to get their money on the front end and the back end."


:laugh:


I don't think he's the brightest guy around, but I don't think he's as dumb as he's been portrayed on here either.


And here's one more quote you guys have been ignoring:


"Actually, I know Josh from college. We're cool. When it's us vs. them, everything's out the window, all friendships are off until the game is over with. I'll probably get a chance to talk to him sooner or later."


He's also not the savage beast that he's being portrayed as.

Just an ordinary beast, not a savage one. :D

ChicagoJ
10-20-2010, 05:55 PM
No, the moral of the story is this: defenders should stop tackling receivers in the neck/head area until the receiver has caught the ball, put two feet down, and made a football move,

because the NFL wants to begin penalizing more severely players who break a rule that has been on the books for quite some time but that players and coaches alike never paid any attention to, because the fines ($5,000 or so in the past) were so incredibly inconsequential.

Alright. I get what you're saying. But in many (not all) of those cases, its an unfortunate accident not a dirty, malicious play. If the receiver were standing still and James hit him helmet-to-helmet then $75,000 isn't nearly large enough of a fine. But Massaquoi was moving and lowered his head too.

I'm okay with these fines if they also start issuing similar fines for chop blocks. Because those aren't usually accidents.

Trader Joe
10-20-2010, 05:56 PM
Maybe not, but he's definitely an idiot. Just because he's wise enough to pick up on the irony that the NFL made money off the hit twice doesn't make his comments about "sleeping" or being hurt vs. being injured any less idiotic.

idioteque
10-20-2010, 06:11 PM
No, the moral of the story is this: defenders should stop tackling receivers in the neck/head area until the receiver has caught the ball, put two feet down, and made a football move,

because the NFL wants to begin penalizing more severely players who break a rule that has been on the books for quite some time but that players and coaches alike never paid any attention to, because the fines ($5,000 or so in the past) were so incredibly inconsequential.

Will this or will this not drastically change football? I watch the NFL, but admittedly I don't know a whole lot about playing the game or its mechanics. I can just see this norm making guys really reticent to hit other players, possibly even being more cautious than they need to be. This could result in a lot of big plays. Will this rule cause Rex Grossman to become Peyton Manning because receivers will be given to much room to catch the ball and make a football play?

Just an aside, the NFL has to love Harrison's boneheaded comments, as it allows the players to be entirely vilified in this affair while making the league look like the victim. I mean Bob Sanders would blow some guys up from time to time, and the league basically rewarded this behavior by letting him be DPOY, and he was DPOY largely because of his hits, Sanders always seemed average at best in coverage.

ChicagoJ
10-20-2010, 06:11 PM
Maybe not, but he's definitely an idiot. Just because he's wise enough to pick up on the irony that the NFL made money off the hit twice doesn't make his comments about "sleeping" or being hurt vs. being injured any less idiotic.

Yeah, but as I also posted, he just knocked out a college friend/ teammate.

I know enough about James Harrison to understand that he had no idea how to properly express (verbally) conflicting emotions - that his play against Cribbs wasn't dirty or illegal but still resulted in his friend losing consciousness.

Plenty of people around here give/ gave Ron Artest a free pass because he said weird/ odd things. James is terrible with the media and just wants to be left alone Keep that in mind. He probably is an idiot, but we're not asking him to be a diplomat either.

It comes back to what he said Sunday night. He wants to hurt (ie, he wants the offensive player saying "ouch!") with his hits but he doesn't want to injure opponents.

And its also a shame that he opened his mouth at all on Sunday. He's clearly said some stupid things this week.

vapacersfan
10-20-2010, 06:32 PM
All good points.

I just hope that this does not either.

A. Turn into a judgement call for the refs

Mr. Ref, why was my guy flagged.
Ref: Well it was a judgement call, and to me it was a devastating hit".

B. The NFL does not go too extreme. If we ever see a rule that states "You can not hit a receiver until he has possesion." the NFL will die.

Pacers#1Fan
10-20-2010, 06:33 PM
Honestly, as a fan, I love seeing someone on the OTHER team getting lit up by one of ours and I'm not going to pretend I don't. It's energizing to the fan base and the team. That being said, is it wrong? If you have the best interest of the players at heart of course hits like that need to be monitored and punished, no question.

I understand that there is a heightened awareness of concussions and other head/neck injuries that could come as a result of hits like that. I also understand that this season is starting out as one of the worst seasons for head and neck injuries sustained during games for the NFL. What I don't understand, however; is why it took something like this to enforce rules that are ALREADY IN PLACE.

I do see the need for enforcement of rules on flagrant violations if for based solely on the reasoning 'if we can't do it to them, at least they can't do it to us' and hopefully this translates into bodies lasting longer. My fear though is the league becoming hypersensitive to big hits. There was nothing wrong with Dunta Robinson's hit by the rules, no helmet to helmet and he lead with his shoulder. If hits like that even begin to get scrutinized then I would be all for seeing a team go out on Monday Night Football and play two-hand-touch.

<object width="480" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/PPFrJ5hyDIo?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/PPFrJ5hyDIo?fs=1&amp;hl=en_US" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="480" height="385"></embed></object>
That's the stuff.

vapacersfan
10-20-2010, 06:39 PM
Serious question, not trying to be a smart ***.

Would that hit get fined today?

ChicagoJ
10-20-2010, 06:49 PM
A. Turn into a judgement call for the refs

Mr. Ref, why was my guy flagged.
Ref: Well it was a judgement call, and to me it was a devastating hit".


Sure. But its not turning into a judgment call for the refs, its turning into a judgement call for the league office.

The Joshua Cribbs play was clearly not a penalty for a million reasons, and was allegedly not part of the NFL's review.

The Massaquoi play was not deemed to be a penalty during the game because at full speed the officials saw that Harrison led with his shoulder and arms, did not launch himself, allowed Massaquoi enough time to either bobble the ball or catch it, and that the only reason Harrison's arms hit Massaquoi in the head (it wasn't really helmet to helmet anyway, it was forearm to helmet) was because Maasquoi moved into the Harrison's path at the last minute. He wasn't a defenseless player.

In that case, I think the on-field officials got it right in real time, at full speed. The league office, with a bevy of controversial hits, wanted to make a big splash and label one of its stars as a "repeat offender" so that everybody knew there was "a new sherrif in town." They should have just stuck with fining Merriweather.

PS, watch the play against Vince Young that Harrison was fined for earlier in the season. If that were anybody but a QB, that's just a regular tackle. But since he tackled a precious QB, its a $5,000 fine to set the stage for "repeat offender" status. Puhleaze. Isn't it bad enough that we allow QBs to slide feet first so that they "can avoid getting hit"?

vapacersfan
10-20-2010, 06:57 PM
Fair point.

Granted, you could just change Mr. Official to Mr. Commish

As far as the QB issue, I agree.

I wont be popular here for saying it, but I remember a while back (2007?) when the Redskins played the Colts I think at FedEx field.

Landry hit Manning and got hit for a 15 yard penalty. Manning ended up coming back in the game and destroying our defense, but I bet if it is any QB besides Manning (or Brady) it is not a penalty.

And I realize it goes both sides. A ND player was one foot out of bound and got tapped and I yelled for a flag. My GF was watching on skype and even she (who knows as much about football as I know about filing my own taxes) laughed and said "It is a contact sport, right. Why did he just go hige out of bounds, and why do you want to reward him for it?" Harsh, but true.

Pacers#1Fan
10-20-2010, 06:59 PM
Serious question, not trying to be a smart ***.

Would that hit get fined today?

This week I think it definitely would have drawn a fine. Next week i would say a game suspension would be discussed.
That's why I threw it in there. A lot of people only view things from the point of "them" until they're made look at it as "us".

Pacers#1Fan
10-20-2010, 07:02 PM
I wont be popular here for saying it, but I remember a while back (2007?) when the Pacers played the Colts I think at FedEx field.




I'm afraid I missed that game ;)

Slick Pinkham
10-20-2010, 07:47 PM
Serious question, not trying to be a smart ***.

Would that hit get fined today?

No way. While the defender lowered his head and attacked with the helmet, this was a running back already with possession of the ball. That was like Harrison's hit on Cribbs. Legal, even if it was helmet-to-helmet.

Again, devastating hits are not subject to penalty, and as far as I am aware, neither are blows to the head or leading with the helmet, except if the neck/head hit is given to a QB in the pocket or to a receiver in the act of catching a pass or fielding a punt.