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MLB007
09-02-2010, 10:12 AM
http://www.southbendtribune.com/article/20100901/SPORTS13/100909926/1001/Sports



By ERIC HANSEN
Tribune Staff Writer
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SOUTH BEND — Whatever tight end hex that former Notre Dame head football coach Charlie Weis was bedeviled with apparently has been passed on to new coach Brian Kelly.

At least in a milder dose.

Three days before Kelly's era opener against Purdue at Notre Dame Stadium, senior backup tight end Mike Ragone was knocked out of action, just as he was reasserting himself on the depth chart.

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Ragone missed Wednesday's practice with what Kelly termed a severe ear infection with vertigo. His status for Saturday's Purdue matchup is questionable.

“He's had severe headaches,” Kelly said. “He's in the infirmary right now.”

Ragone missed a handful of practices earlier in preseason with heat illness. That helped sophomore Tyler Eifert to leapfrog Ragone on the depth chart and freshman Alex Welch to open some eyes.

“He can't catch a break right now,” Kelly said of Ragone. “He had two great days of practice - two very, very good days.”

ChristianDudley
09-02-2010, 03:56 PM
There's just something about playing sports in Indiana....

Day-V
09-02-2010, 03:58 PM
I love that word, "infirmary".

Cactus Jax
09-02-2010, 04:52 PM
I hope they dont force him to play if he's still hurting. As most of us have read about Tyler's vertigo it took a look time for the symptoms to go away as it wrecked most of his rookie season.

ToasterBusVIP
09-02-2010, 11:07 PM
There's just something about playing sports in Indiana....

Well, as someone who was born in Indiana and lived there for over 20 years, I wouldn't be surprised if there is something to that. While in Indiana I have always had trouble with seasonal allergies, which in turn contributed to constant swelling and closing of the Eustachian tube (which links the pharynx to the middle ear and is what allows you to equalize pressure in your ears).

When I was away from the Midwest, I never had those problems. So no I wouldn't really be surprised if there's a connection with constant ear infections and a more serious condition like vertigo.

Bball
09-03-2010, 01:18 AM
Well, as someone who was born in Indiana and lived there for over 20 years, I wouldn't be surprised if there is something to that. While in Indiana I have always had trouble with seasonal allergies, which in turn contributed to constant swelling and closing of the Eustachian tube (which links the pharynx to the middle ear and is what allows you to equalize pressure in your ears).

When I was away from the Midwest, I never had those problems. So no I wouldn't really be surprised if there's a connection with constant ear infections and a more serious condition like vertigo.

I find it hard to believe that a condition like you've described would be overlooked or missed in Tyler's case. Way too many medical professionals involved to think that would happen with a professional NBA player after this amount of time. It's a little more plausible in an NCAA player, especially early on... but even they have access to some very good doctors and ultimately a network of doctors if things don't clear.

ToasterBusVIP
09-05-2010, 01:58 AM
I find it hard to believe that a condition like you've described would be overlooked or missed in Tyler's case. Way too many medical professionals involved to think that would happen with a professional NBA player after this amount of time. It's a little more plausible in an NCAA player, especially early on... but even they have access to some very good doctors and ultimately a network of doctors if things don't clear.

Well I don't know about that. Colds and allergies happen, you can take antihistamines and whatnot but everybody gets them. I'm not even going to mention sinus infections here. It's not that the allergies directly involve ear infections, those can happen as a result of the inner ear becoming inflamed or weakened through colds/allergies and being susceptible to infection. If the vertigo was brought on by a viral infection, which I understand is often the case, it's likely the doctors wouldn't know about it until the virus had taken hold. I'm no doctor, but this sounds like a likely culprit:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vestibular_neuritis