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Bball
06-29-2004, 01:18 AM
Interesting story and point...
Also... Primoz gets mentioned tho I doubt it makes his scrapbook.
-Bball

Snub of Rice shows NBA teams often miss the point


June 28, 2004
By Gregg Doyel
SportsLine.com Senior Writer
Tell Gregg your opinion!




The 2004 NBA Draft came and went without a single team spending a pick on Miami (Fla.) senior Darius Rice, which shows how stupid the NBA can be.

The NBA needs Rice, and players like him. The thing is, there aren't many players like him. Which is why the NBA needs him.

Forget the basketball skill, of which Rice has plenty, and listen to this story:

Darius Rice was the centerpiece of a Hurricanes team that went nowhere.(Getty Images)
Rice's father is dying. Ten years ago, Tom Rice, a former All-American football player at Jackson State, suffered kidney failure. His kidneys had been a bane even before that, sending this mammoth man to the hospital on several occasions, but he was forced to stop coaching football at Lanier High School when Darius was 8. Tom fainted, right there on the field. Darius was next to him when it happened.

Tom eventually would get a kidney transplant, but when Darius was a senior at Lanier High, that kidney failed. Darius, a McDonald's All-American who had chosen Miami over Kentucky, offered Tom one of his kidneys. That's the love of a good son.

Tom said no. That's the love of a good father.

"You can't play in the NBA with one kidney," Tom Rice said Friday, the morning after all 30 NBA teams ignored his son.

That's about all Tom will say about his health, other than to confirm that he undergoes dialysis three times a week. Tom won't say what others will, that for the past four years, Darius has asked his father -- begged him -- to take one of his kidneys. That offer Darius made as a high school senior? It wasn't a one-time thing. It was, and remains to this day, a standing offer.

For four years, Tom has told his son, "No."

Now the NBA has told Darius the same thing.

Stupid NBA. In four years at Miami, Rice led the Hurricanes in scoring all four seasons and finished with 1,865 points. Forget that Miami was a lousy team for most of his career, the fault of since-fired coach Perry Clark, and consider how difficult it must have been for Rice to average 16 points and six rebounds and shoot 35 percent on 3-pointers as the best player on a bad team against great competition.

The NBA ignored Rice while drafting another legion of foreigners. When will NBA teams learn that, as they flail about for the next Dirk Nowitzki, they're more likely to get the next Jake Tsakalidis, Primoz Brezec or Igor Rakocevic?

Those were three of the foreign players taken in the 2000 NBA Draft, a draft that in hindsight Darius Rice should have entered. No, he wasn't half the player then that he is now, but the NBA doesn't care about what kind of player you are now. The NBA cares about what kind of player you might become.

In 2000, Rice was a 6-foot-10 small forward with decent athleticism and a great 3-point shooting stroke. He could have become a superstar, and had he been available in the 2000 draft, someone in the NBA would have taken him -- perhaps late in the first round.

Four years later Rice is still a 6-10 small forward with decent athleticism and a great 3-point shooting stroke. He's also four years smarter on the court, and in those four years he hasn't even whiffed trouble off it.

The NBA doesn't care about that, either. One of Rice's classmates from 2000, Eddie Griffin, turned pro after one season at Seton Hall, where he sucker-punched teammate Ty Shine in the locker room after Shine had failed to pass him the ball late in the game. Griffin was drafted No. 7 overall in 2001, but should anyone be truly surprised that his career has been jeopardized by a litany of legal and behavioral problems in the past year?

Rice spends his spare time playing chess or tinkering on his computer, or maybe even studying. He's a finance major, roughly one semester short of graduating, and won the Lanier High School Science and Mathematics Award, as well as the Kodak National Leadership Award.

No, the NBA doesn't need players like Darius Rice, or fathers like Tom Rice.

Listen to this story:

On Friday, a couple of hours before his third weekly dialysis treatment, Tom Rice was asked how he was feeling.

"I'm hurting," he said. "I expected Darius to get drafted."

No, Mr. Rice. How are you, you know, feeling?

"Oh," he said. "My health is OK. But my heart is more hurt right now based on the outcome of the draft."
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http://www.sportsline.com/collegebasketball/story/7457722

Young
06-29-2004, 01:22 AM
The reason why he slipped is one word, IMO, inconsistant.

But the grass can be greenier on the other side, just ask Marquis Daniels.

Kegboy
06-29-2004, 01:35 AM
The reason why he slipped is one word, IMO, inconsistant.

But the grass can be greenier on the other side, just ask Marquis Daniels.

Yep, in today's NBA, you're better off going undrafted than being a second-round pick. Sure worked for Brad.
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:duel:

MagicRat
06-29-2004, 01:38 AM
But the grass can be greenier on the other side, just ask Marquis Daniels.

But if you're not lucky, it could be Golic-ier.....:rolleyes:....Sorry, it's late......

Kegboy
06-29-2004, 01:40 AM
But the grass can be greenier on the other side, just ask Marquis Daniels.

But if you're not lucky, it could be Golic-ier.....:rolleyes:....Sorry, it's late......




:laugh:

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:duel:

MSA2CF
06-30-2004, 05:13 PM
Sad story and all, but if the kid can't compete at the NBA level, then it doesn't really doesn't matter to NBA teams. Hopefully, some team will sign him. If not, there's always the NBDL, Europe, ABA, Harlem Globetrotters, AND1 Streetballers, etc. I don't mean to come off as a jerk if I have. :neutral:

Snickers
06-30-2004, 07:05 PM
You're right. If he's not NBA talent, and he doesn't have the "potential" that so many teams take risks on, there's no reason for a team to draft or sign him. He'll get a chance in somebody's summer league, though.

I remember a player by the name of Sitapha Savane, who was drafted be the Senegal [I think] military, and if he had made it to the NBA he wouldn't have had to serve.

I read an emotional article about it, and met the guy in person, and really wanted him to make it. [he was 6'10", athletic, and had good fundamentals, so it wasn't that much of a stretch]

No such luck. He's probably toiling away in some hot, dusty corner of Africa now. :(

I saw Rice here at the Portsmouth tournament, and he didn't do much of anything in any of the games I watched. Hopefully he'll impress somebody in summer league/training camp. :whoknows: