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View Full Version : Bucks mascot falls throught the hoop



plutarch
02-20-2009, 01:09 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f_VdySnHsJY&eurl=http://sports.yahoo.com/nba/blog/ball_dont_lie/post/Video-Bucks-mascot-tears-ACL-in-knee-from-groin?urn=nba,142557

one of the funnies videos i have seen in a long time

Trader Joe
02-20-2009, 01:15 AM
Not as funny knowing the guy blew out his knee.

Roaming Gnome
02-20-2009, 01:15 AM
Did Bango flip off Rufus for hitting him in the "giggle berries" before he fell thru the hoop? Kinda looks like it.

dal9
02-20-2009, 02:15 AM
Not as funny knowing the guy blew out his knee.

but still pretty funny
what the hell was he thinking up there?

pizza guy
02-20-2009, 02:20 AM
Ouch.

Bball
02-20-2009, 03:12 AM
I woulda lost a bet if anyone had ever bet me whether a mascot could fit thru a hoop or not.

-Bball

Lord Helmet
02-20-2009, 04:16 AM
I feel terrible for him.

I don't find it very funny since he got hurt pretty bad, the YouTube comments make me sick, but then again, it's YouTube comments, which are always trash.

RamBo_Lamar
02-20-2009, 04:59 AM
The reindeer's reaction at getting beaned in the gonads was pretty funny at first.

Obviously though, the through-the-hoop stunt did not go smoothly. Got to give the
guy credit though for attempting such a high risk manuver.

At the end of the video after he gets up limping, you can see him clapping trying to
play it off. Hopefully he'll be ok, and a bit more careful if there is a next time he
tries that.

Bball
02-20-2009, 05:19 AM
You mean he went thru the hoop on purpose? I thought he was just standing up there being a 'mascot' and slipped...

-Bball

RamBo_Lamar
02-20-2009, 05:42 AM
It appears (to me at least) like he looks down at the hoop first before trying to
slide down through it. It would have probably worked pretty smoothly had he
not caught the rim with his knee.

It just appears to me like he knew what he was doing, but I could well be wrong.

Bball
02-20-2009, 05:50 AM
I just saw no pad below and assumed he had no intention of going thru... but what do I know?

-Bball

SoupIsGood
02-20-2009, 06:48 AM
It didn't seem to me like he went to go through. Although, looking at it again, he might have! Why else would he look down and stick his left leg out like that?

Either way, being up there was just a bad idea. The only thing worse than blowing out your knee must be blowing out your knee and then having to fall down about 10 feet onto hardcourt. : /

Looks like Bango's a trooper, though--he'll be back in action (albeit at half-speed) in a few games: http://www.nba.com/bucks/news/bango_injury_0900218.html

focused444
02-20-2009, 06:55 AM
the mascot tore his acl......

yahoo sports

http://sports.yahoo.com/nba/blog/ball_dont_lie/post/Video-Bucks-mascot-tears-ACL-in-knee-from-groin;_ylt=AkidfNbPAKu.aDwjPF3a0Qq8vLYF?urn=nba,14 2557

my bad soup i didnt see you posted a link to this already

Unclebuck
02-20-2009, 09:30 AM
Yes, even mascots are people too

Major Cold
02-20-2009, 10:04 AM
Did Bango flip off Rufus for hitting him in the "giggle berries" before he fell thru the hoop? Kinda looks like it.
I laughed heartily at the clip. But this comment almost made me pee.

Unclebuck
02-20-2009, 10:58 AM
Didn't Boomer tear his ACL several years ago. This was in his maybe 2nd or 3rd season

Shade
02-20-2009, 11:25 AM
I think it's pretty obvious that he didn't intend to fall through the hoop. There would have been a pad below the basket.

Los Angeles
02-20-2009, 01:50 PM
For your consideration:

http://espn.go.com/page2/s/bloc/031216.html



When the feathers fly . . . | From Patrick Hruby:

Ladies and gentlemen of the jury, my esteemed WB colleagues offer pithy one-liners (Eric Neel, Tom Friend), anguished testimonials (Chuck Hirshberg), pathological Yankee hatred masquerading as sly sarcasm (Jim Caple).

Being a humble man of letters, and a junior one at that, I make no such grandiose claims.

Instead, I offer physical, tangible evidence. I offer reasoned, dispassionate proof. I offer science.

Mascots have the hardest job in sports. This much is indisputable, surer than the sun rising in the East, nearly as sure as Jose Canseco's claim that a cocktail of steroids and Human Growth Hormone can add 30 years to your life.


Keep the kids away from Herky the Hawkeye.

But don't take my word for it. Ask the experts. Dr. Edward McFarland, director of sports medicine and shoulder surgery at Johns Hopkins, is the author of a one-of-its-kind study on mascot injuries. Among his findings, which I have submitted as Exhibit No. 1:

* More than half of all mascots have been stricken with a heat-related injury.

* Forty-four percent of mascots suffer from chronic lower-back pain.

* Almost a fifth have sustained knee injuries while working.

In the last decade alone, Seattle's Mariner Moose has broken his leg after skating into an outfield wall. The mascot for the now-defunct Baltimore BayRunners blew out his knee while playing air guitar. Baltimore's Oriole Bird severed the tip of his finger after catching it in a spring-loaded steel door.

Again, recall Dr. McFarland's prior testimony, given under oath:

"A lot of mascots have stories about getting hit in the 'nads," he said. "That's just about the right height for kids to punch. They think they're aiming for the stomach. But they're not."

Ladies and gentlemen, I ask you: Does Gerri Hirshey's locker room attendant endure similar risk?

Now, turn your attention to Exhibit No. 2. You see before you -- smell before you -- the disembodied head of Globie, the Harlem Globetrotters' mascot.

Our furry friends have a cardinal rule: Never wear another guy's head. In a six-month period, the Globie costume traveled around the world and was cleaned exactly once. Consider what the man behind the mask, Paul Pierson, had to say:

"On a scale of 1 to 10, the stench (was) about a 50. The stench (was) horrible. I'll tell you what: You can wash a costume, get it from the dry cleaners, use Bounce, Snuggles, whatever. But the moment you put it on and go out there for five minutes, that clean smell is gone. And that stench just comes straight through."

Ladies and gentlemen, I ask you: Does Eric Adelson's stadium cleanup guy have to stick his head into a bucket of dried puke and half-eaten nachos for hours at a time? Or does he work in an open-air environment?

You may notice that the courtroom is uncomfortably warm today. Why? I asked Rusty, the bailiff, to set the thermostat to 125 degrees. Am I trying to fry an egg on the judge's bench? No. I'm simply giving you a feel for life inside the average mascot costume, where temperatures can soar up to 40 degrees above external conditions.

Ladies and gentlemen, Dr. McFarland reports that the average mascot loses 8.6 pounds per performance. Do Peter Keating's put-upon urine collectors, laboring in climate-controlled comfort, sweat half as much?

Our furry friends work in fear — for both life and feathered limb. Four years ago, a Philadelphia electrician shoved Baltimore mascot John Krownapple off the right field wall at Camden Yards. He fell 15 feet and spent a month in a wheelchair. During the 1994 World Cup, former Washington Capitals mascot Erin Blank was groped by a man from Denmark. Tommy Lasorda once exchanged blows with the Phillie Phanatic.

Ladies and gentlemen, does Jim Caple's Brian Cashman risk fondling at the hands of a grabby Dane?

Despite their troubles, despite their hard work and sacrifice, our mascots make as little as $50 a game. Rasheed Wallace should be sticking up for them. And like Mr. Wallace's Portland teammates, mascots often find themselves here, in court.

A Detroit Tigers fan sued the team's mascot, PAWS, after suffering neck and jaw injuries when he was hit by a foul ball. He claimed he was watching the mascot and not the game. In a separate incident, a court levied a $2.5 million judgment against the Phanatic after a man suffered back injuries from being hugged too hard.

Ladies and gentlemen, does Alan Grant's block-holder run the risk of frivolous litigation, even in a sport where drug test lawsuits are the norm?

For all these reasons, I respectfully submit that mascots have the toughest jobs in sport. The decision is yours. Examine the facts. The evidence is overwhelming. The proof is indisputable. Make your judgment in good conscience. Only one outcome is truly just.

Thank you. The defense rests.

Oh, and your honor, the defense would like to object to Jim Caple's claim that Brian Cashman has the easiest job in sports.

In reality, the easiest job in sports goes to the singer that followed Carl Lewis' epochal butchering of the national anthem at a Chicago Bulls game a few years back. No contest.

And another thing ...

http://www.usatoday.com/sports/tenworstjobs-10-mascot.htm



It's not all fun at the games; being mascot is hard work

By Erik Brady, USA TODAY

Bromley Lowe left his size-22 floppy shoes on the pitcher's mound in September following his last game after 10 seasons as the Oriole Bird.

"I loved the job," he says. "In some ways it was the greatest job you could have. But I had to give it up because it was just so physically draining."


By H. Darr Beiser, USA TODAY
The Oriole Bird slides under a make-believe tag during pregame antics at Camden Yards in 1999.

It's not that easy being green. Just ask Tom Burgoyne, who as the Phillie Phanatic plays the big galoot in the shag-green suit. "It's supposed to look easy," Burgoyne says. "But it's not. This is hard work."

Comedians have a saying that dying is easy — comedy is hard. Mascot work is harder yet. Don't believe it? Lowe says you should try wearing an outfit of synthetic feathers, foam and fiberglass on a 100-degree day in July.

"Imagine wearing a fur coat in a sauna while doing aerobics," Lowe says. "That's what it's like."

Once, during a game on a 105-degree day, Lowe saw spots and thought he was going to pass out. He says he has lost as many as 10 pounds in a game, even though he and a partner traded innings so one could always be out of the sun and drinking water.

"Parades are the worst," Lowe says. "I was in a Fourth of July parade in Laurel, Md., in 1995, and it felt like it would never end. I was treated in an ambulance. They hooked me up to an IV. But eventually you learn to pace yourself. I think the San Diego Chicken put it best: 'If you can't stand the heat, get out of the chicken.' "

Break a leg

Orthopedic surgeon Edward McFarland, who heads the sports medicine program at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, surveyed mascots in the NFL, NBA and MLB and found 42% have suffered heat-related illnesses.

McFarland sent surveys to 71 mascots for pro teams in 2001 and got answers back from 48, or about two-thirds. Of these, 20 reported a heat illness, including 14 who were treated with intravenous fluids and one who was hospitalized.

Almost all of the mascots reported injuries of one kind or another, the most common being ankle sprains, reported by almost one-third; 21 injuries were severe enough to require surgery.

Among the mascot mishaps cited in the report: "falling off a wall while performing a somersault, being pushed off a 10-foot wall by a fan, falling off a dugout, flipping over moped handlebars during a skit, being tackled by fans and players, falling awkwardly when performing basketball dunks, being hit in the head with a bat and being run over by a van during a skit."

John Krownapple was the Oriole Bird in 1999 on a day when he and Lowe took turns performing. Krownapple was in the right-field bleachers when a drunken fan gave him a two-handed shove onto the field 10 feet below. Krownapple broke both ankles and spent 40 days in a wheelchair.

"People think of you as a cartoon character," Lowe says. "They tend to forget that the guy inside the suit is flesh and blood."

Sometimes it takes cartoon characters to remind us of that. On the episode of The Simpsons that aired after the Super Bowl, Homer Simpson opens a showboating academy for preening athletes.

"After you prance across the goal line," Homer advises, "you roll the other team's mascot to the ground and drive your cleats into his neck."

"Homer, are you sure we aren't crossing a line here?" fictional football star Deion Overstreet says. "I happen to know the person inside that leprechaun suit is a single mother."

Mascot wanted

Burgoyne agrees his job stinks — but only literally. Otherwise he rejects the premise that he has one of the worst jobs in sports.

"I get paid to watch games and make people laugh," he says. "How great is that?"

But what about the heat and the smell and the danger?

"Sure, it smells, and you get the occasional foul ball to the noggin. I sweat through five T-shirts a night. But that's no big deal. You put some stick-on air fresheners in the head and Febreze under the armpits at night and you're good to go."

Burgoyne remembers the day in 1989 when he scoured the want ads in The Philadelphia Inquirer. He was a year out of business school at Drexel and checked first under S, for sales, and then under M, for management. That's when he saw it: Mascot Wanted.

He had been the Hawk at Saint Joseph's Prep in Philadelphia. So he answered the blind ad, which turned out to be for the backup Phanatic. He performed more than 1,000 times in shopping malls and classrooms before Dave Raymond, the original Phanatic, left after 16 years in 1994. Burgoyne has been the man since.

"You take some physical risks, I guess," Burgoyne says. "But most of the time you just shake it off and move on."

Numb shoulders

The Hawk at Saint Joseph's University is often cited as the best mascot in college sports. This season is the 50th in which a costumed student has flapped his wings for every moment of every game. The Hawk flaps continuously for roughly two hours, even through halftime.

"It's the hardest thing I've ever done, by far," Saint Joe's senior Mike Tecce says. "The worst is the first half hour to 45 minutes. After that your shoulders go numb and you can just keep going."

How many flaps does he do every game? "Everyone asks me that," Tecce says. "I'm an accounting major, but I don't keep count. It's hard enough as it is."

ESPN kept count during a game a few years ago and estimated 3,500 flaps a game. Try flapping your arms at home with no heavy costume. You'll be tired by 50, if not 15.

But don't dare suggest that being a mascot is among the worst job in sports. Tecce figures for him it's the best. He gets a scholarship. And he gets to represent the indomitable spirit of his school.

Tecce is the 28th student to be the Hawk, a tradition begun in 1956. The job is a coveted one. Tecce wrote an essay on why he wanted to be the Hawk, appeared before a panel of judges and was interviewed by Saint Joe's coach Phil Martelli.

"I am an ambassador for my school," Tecce says. "I'm a symbol of our spirit. I can't even begin to explain how huge that is for me. This is the coolest thing I've ever done."

The age-old battle cry at St. Joe's is: "The Hawk will never die."

Of course not. Dying is easy. Mascoting is hard.

grace
02-20-2009, 03:30 PM
Didn't Boomer tear his ACL several years ago. This was in his maybe 2nd or 3rd season

Yes he did. I don't remember what year, but it was back in the MSA days.

As for Bango, the Bucks TV play by play guy said he tore his antler crucitae ligament (pun intended).

duke dynamite
02-20-2009, 03:31 PM
Wow, this really startled me when I saw it. I hope he is okay.

idioteque
02-20-2009, 03:32 PM
Didn't Boomer tear his ACL several years ago. This was in his maybe 2nd or 3rd season

Yes. The person who played Boomer back then was related to a girl I went to grade school with.

I felt bad laughing about this, but God I couldn't help it.

YoSoyIndy
02-20-2009, 09:05 PM
I feel terrible for him.

I don't find it very funny since he got hurt pretty bad, the YouTube comments make me sick, but then again, it's YouTube comments, which are always trash.

I think it is OK to find it funny as long as you're not laughing because the guy got hurt. I'm sure the mascot himself laughed when he saw it. Seconds after having a halfcourt shot banked off his crotch, he did a vertical splits through a basketball net. That's amazing and hilarious.

ECKrueger
02-20-2009, 11:06 PM
I think it is OK to find it funny as long as you're not laughing because the guy got hurt. I'm sure the mascot himself laughed when he saw it. Seconds after having a halfcourt shot banked off his crotch, he did a vertical splits through a basketball net. That's amazing and hilarious.

Ahh, I feel better then.

Hoop
02-21-2009, 12:21 AM
Check out this one.

<object height="344" width="425">


<embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/UZMKwmApTP4&hl=en&fs=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" height="344" width="425"></object>

PacersRule
02-21-2009, 12:38 AM
OH MY GOSH! THAT IS CRAZY! Was that actually real? What if they failed?

Lord Helmet
02-21-2009, 04:33 AM
I think it is OK to find it funny as long as you're not laughing because the guy got hurt. I'm sure the mascot himself laughed when he saw it. Seconds after having a halfcourt shot banked off his crotch, he did a vertical splits through a basketball net. That's amazing and hilarious.
Agreed.

31andonly
02-21-2009, 07:24 AM
Check out this one.

<object width="425" height="344">


<embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/UZMKwmApTP4&hl=en&fs=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"></object>

You gotta be kiddin' me..is this real? I'm not sure..

However...the girl is in pain while the others are jumping around...

Makes you wonder why people do things like that :rolleyes:

Hicks
02-21-2009, 10:12 AM
I think that one was a fake. I hope it was.

count55
02-21-2009, 07:39 PM
I think that one was a fake. I hope it was.

Looked possibly authentic...


You gotta be kiddin' me..is this real? I'm not sure..

However...the girl is in pain while the others are jumping around...

Makes you wonder why people do things like that :rolleyes:

Actually, if the girl was that dumb and trusting to try that (if it was real), you have to wonder exactly what else those four guys have talked her into doing?

SoupIsGood
02-21-2009, 08:49 PM
It's fake. She slaps the net as she goes by.