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Erik
10-25-2008, 05:03 PM
I never really cared to burn movies before and I don't really know my way around a computer. But, I am getting the urge to find a good system to download movies from the internet and also make copies from my current library for my retired stepfather. I was wondering if any of you knew of a simple program that a guy like me could work with. I'm sure it's not overly complicated but I remember a friend telling me that he uses some sort of decoding software with his, and that's where I get a little confused, is it still nescasary to have to do that? Thanks in advance for playing the roll of a Best Buy employee.

Bball
10-26-2008, 12:22 AM
Nero Recode (part of the Nero suite) works well. Nero is commercially available either online or places like Best Buy.

For free software look into:
DVD Shrink
or
Ripit4Me
or
* DVD Fab HD Decrypter

* Earlier versions were free but I think newer ones are not.

DVD Shrink is easy to work with and free and will do MOST DVD's. Every once in a while a DVD will have some newer copy protection scheme that it won't be able to copy... and then generally one of the others will be able to do it. (Which is not to say Nero is any different in that regard).

IIRC you also need either DVD Decryptor installed or at least the basic version of Nero (which comes with many computers) as DVD Shrink uses other software routines for it's burning.

You can copy complete discs and compress them to fit on single layer discs or copy just the movie (which requires less or no compression to fit on a single layer DVD). If you search for the above titles you'll find forums and FAQS dedicated to them.

-Bball

Erik
10-26-2008, 02:18 AM
Thank You.

RamBo_Lamar
10-26-2008, 03:36 AM
While a little pricey, 1Click DVD Copy works quite nicely while running
DVD43 for decryption.

If you want to get into stuff like transfering VHS tapes to DVD, then
the Nero program Bball recommended is very good. It has support for
many video capture cards. A "video stabilizer" box can be connected
between the VCR and capture card for decryption of VHS tapes.

IMPORTANT NOTE: Making copies of copyrighted media is illegal
unless it is of your own personal collection for backup purposes only.
Even then the legality of doing so might be argued.

Anthem
10-26-2008, 08:38 PM
I'm a big HandBrake fan for ripping, but that doesn't give you any extras... only the video itself.

Of course, that's why I like it.

duke dynamite
10-27-2008, 01:04 AM
For legal DVD buring I use Nero 9.

For not-so-legal buring, I suggest DVD Decrypter (Copyright Protection remover) and DVD Shrink (So you don't have to spend a butt-load of money on dual-layer DVDs.

Hicks
10-27-2008, 02:03 AM
I'm surprised you deleted that, count.

RamBo_Lamar
10-27-2008, 09:04 AM
I'm surprised you deleted that, count.

I saw that too, and understand the point he was making.

I will add a statement to my post that making copies of copyrighted media is
illegal unless it is of your own personal collection for backup purposes only.

duke dynamite
10-27-2008, 11:54 AM
I will add a statement to my post that making copies of copyrighted media is
illegal unless it is of your own personal collection for backup purposes only.
What sucks is that the MPAA and RIAA considers that illegal, too.

Heck, they think ripping your own CDs to your computer for your portable music device should be illegal.

Major Cold
10-27-2008, 12:10 PM
Support your musicians and buy their music. That is all I am gonna say.

RamBo_Lamar
10-27-2008, 02:33 PM
Here is further info from Bitwise Magazine:

http://www.bitwisemag.com/copy/reviews/software/dvdsoftware/dvdsoftware.html#isitlegalanchor


YES, BUT IS IT LEGAL?

If you have a recordable DVD drive and some software to record DVDs, does this mean that you are on the High Seas towards piracy? The answer to that is, ‘well, maybe’. Or then again, ‘maybe not’.
There are, of course, plenty of legitimate uses for a DVD recorder. If you want to back up your personal data files or your home videos, then you are on safe ground: it’s legal. On the other hand, the position is equally clear-cut if you plan on copying Hollywood blockbuster movies and selling them on the Internet: that’s illegal!
But what if you want to make a personal backup of a DVD movie that you’ve bought for safe keeping? Or maybe you’d like to copy a DVD to your hard disk of your laptop? Then again, what if you’ve recorded a TV show onto your video or DVD player and you want to make a copy of it to give to a friend? The usual wishy-washy answer to these questions is that the legality may depend on the laws of your native country. But, come on, most of us know that in most countries duplicating copyrighted materials, for whatever reason, is likely to be frowned upon by the officers of the Law. And yet, most of probably wouldn’t consider it a very grave offence to make copies of a TV show or make a personal backup of a DVD which we legally own.
The fact of the matter is that the legal issues in many countries are not yet fully resolved. In the USA, for example, it is legal to make a backup of an audio CD but (possibly?) not of a video DVD. The crucial American legislation is the Digital Millennium Copyright Act of 1998 which outlaws devices or services aimed at circumventing copyright protection technologies. This law appears to be somewhat fuzzy around the edges, however. In 2004, a San Francisco federal judge ruled that some DVD copying products from a company called 321 Studios were illegal on the grounds that they circumvented CSS (Content Scrambling System) encryption technology. The San Francisco ruling did not, however, state that DVD copying itself was illegal. 321 Studio responded by releasing a new DVD copying product without decryption. But very few commercially available DVD movies lack CSS encryption, so it is not surprising that this product failed to achieve the popularity of its predecessor. 321 Studio subsequently ceased operations.
A similarly named product called 123 Copy DVD is now available from http://www.123copydvd.com (http://www.123copydvd.com/). This lacks built-in decryption but provides links to a 3rd party plugin which does decrypt. The company claims that its product is legal in the USA. However, when you click the link to download the plugin, a message warns “Some 3rd party plug-ins not legal in certain areas around the world.”
In some European countries, it is either legal or at least not definitely illegal to make personal backup copies of a DVD. In Germany it is illegal to distribute any software capable of evading copy protection. In Norway the legality of breaking the CSS algorithm was tested in 1999, when the algorithm was made public by Jon Johansen. Mr Johansen cracked the algorithm in order to create a program to play DVDs on computer running the Linux operating system. He then posted his program code, DeCSS, on the Internet. The movie industry took Johansen to Court - and lost! In January 2003, the court ruled that Norwegian citizens were free to make copies of DVDs which they had bought legally. The Motion Picture Association of America was far from overjoyed by this ruling. In a statement they said: “ The actions of serial hackers such as Mr. Johansen are damaging to honest consumers everywhere. While the ruling does not affect laws outside of Norway, we believe this decision encourages circumvention of copyright that threatens consumer choice and employment in the film and television industries.”
As you may gather, this is an area that is fraught with legal pitfalls. We would therefore suggest that you assume that, if in doubt as to whether or not the law permits you to copy, decrypt or backup a DVD, you should presume that it does not. It is legal in most countries to use a DVD burning application which lacks decryption capabilities. Many of these legal applications claim that they allow you to copy DVD movies “for your own personal use”. However, there are almost no DVD movies which are not encrypted. Which makes you wonder how people manage to use these legal DVD burning applications without the use of some additional software of less certain legality….?

duke dynamite
10-27-2008, 05:24 PM
The fact of the matter is that the legal issues in many countries are not yet fully resolved. In the USA, for example, it is legal to make a backup of an audio CD but (possibly?) not of a video DVD.


That is true, but earlier this year the RIAA said it should be illegal to rip CDs. LOL

duke dynamite
10-27-2008, 05:25 PM
From Engadget.



RIAA not suing over CD ripping, still kinda being jerks about it

by Nilay Patel, posted Dec 30th 2007 at 12:16PM


Okay, so we've done some digging into the RIAA's lawsuit against Jeffery Howell, in which the industry is claiming that ripped MP3s are "unauthorized copies," and it turns out that Jeffery isn't actually being sued for ripping CDs, like the Washington Post and several other sources have reported, but for plain old illegal downloading. As we're all unfortunately aware, that's pretty standard stuff; the big change from previous downloading cases is the RIAA's newfound aggressiveness in calling MP3s ripped from legally owned CDs "unauthorized copies" -- something it's been doing quietly for a while, but now it looks like the gloves are off. While there's a pretty good argument for the legality of ripping under the market factor of fair use, it's never actually been ruled as such by a judge -- so paradoxically, the RIAA might be shooting itself in the foot here, because a judge wouldn't ever rule on it unless they argue that it's illegal. Looks like someone may end up being too clever for their own good, eh?


http://www.engadget.com/2007/12/30/riaa-not-suing-over-cd-ripping-still-kinda-being-jerks-about-it/

RamBo_Lamar
10-28-2008, 07:25 AM
I can remember as a kid going to the store to do food shopping with my
mother. I would get her to buy this cereal (I think it was Honeycombs)
because they would have these cardboard record singles of The Monkeys
attached to the backs of the boxes. Was able to collect 5 or so different
songs, and would play them on my father's record player. They were very
cool.

Having had a cheap tape recorder that was given to me as a toy, used to
put the mic in front of one of the stereo speakers (the records were already
in mono) and make a recording of the records to have as one tape "album"
that I could listen to all the time. It would take some experimenting to get
the tone and volume levels on the stereo set just right for a good quality
recording, but eventually got it to come out pretty good.

Of course, I thought what I was doing was perfectly fine.

That was not that much different (in concept anyway) from modern day
media copying, except that the technology has advanced to the point that
it is possible to make very high quality (if not perfect) copies of the original.
The way I see it, is if you own the original the copy was taken from, and are
using copies only for your own personal use, then the artist, or actor, or
owner of the copyright isn't getting short-changed out of any royalties they
might be due.

If you rip an MP3 from a CD you own, and listen to the MP3s instead of the
CD, that saves wear and tear on your original which the artist has already
collected their fees for. If you listen to the MP3 over and over it would
be like listening to the CD over and over, and I certainly have never heard
of any restrictions on how often you can listen to a CD that you have
purchased.

Bball
10-28-2008, 11:07 AM
In the case of CD's maybe musicians are going to have to learn to play live again and someone needs to figure out that you don't need fireworks, dancers, and a multi-million dollar production to tour. That way you can keep ticket prices reasonable so that existing fans can all afford to see the band and you can cultivate new fans along the way too.

RamBo_Lamar
10-28-2008, 11:25 AM
In the case of CD's maybe musicians are going to have to learn to play live again and someone needs to figure out that you don't need fireworks, dancers, and a multi-million dollar production to tour. That way you can keep ticket prices reasonable so that existing fans can all afford to see the band and you can cultivate new fans along the way too.

And in the case of DVDs, actors and actresses need to go back to doing
Vaudeville type acts instead of making movies with $100,000,000 budgets!

:laugh:

Bball
10-28-2008, 12:10 PM
And in the case of DVDs, actors and actresses need to go back to doing
Vaudeville type acts instead of making movies with $100,000,000 budgets!

:laugh:

Watching box office returns I'd have to say that there's been no significant hit on movie ticket sales at the box office so actors will be fine.

I have a sneaking feeling that most of the illegal copying that goes on is between people who would never have purchased the DVD in the first place. They copy, watch, and even share... all out of convenience. But take away that convenience and they'd never buy, rent, or even watch the movie until it was on free TV.

I read something a while back saying that even though CD profits (or sales) were down and record labels crying about that, if you dig deeper their overall profits are up because of legitimate downloads and the like.