PDA

View Full Version : Jennings opts to play in Europe



SpADeD
07-09-2008, 07:30 AM
Don't know if this should be in this forum or not, but Arizona recruit Brandon Jennings decided to give away his scholarship and play in Europe for 1 year before going into the draft. Just wondering what everyones thoughts on this is and the odds of it becoming a trend.

http://sports.espn.go.com/ncb/news/story?id=3479195

Justin Tyme
07-09-2008, 09:10 AM
Why would a Euro team want to sign him for one year and lose that year investment in him when they know he's just looking to make some bucks while qualifying to go to the NBA? He would be a one and done just like if he had gone to college, but he'd be getting paid legally.

If Euro teams are willing to do it and with the money they now are spending on contracts, it would give young high school players a valid option instead of going to college or the D-league.

It's an interesting situation, and could possibly hurt colleges in recruiting star players.

owl
07-09-2008, 09:17 AM
I believe the current NBA rule is a joke anyway. These kids should not be restricted from
entering the draft out of HS. Plus, it makes a mockery of "education" as most of these kids
will laugh their way through class, if they even show up. The college game should not be
the D-League for the NBA.

rexnom
07-09-2008, 09:36 AM
Depending on how good Jennings is, this could be huge.

DGPR
07-09-2008, 09:38 AM
Stern needs to seriously re-consider this rule about High School players. Consider the amount of freshmen players that came out of this year's and last year's drafts.

Dukins
07-09-2008, 09:42 AM
How can a 16yr. old kid be drafted by the Oakland Athletics, but HSers cant be drafted by the NBA. Stern definitely needs to reconsider this. When I got out of high school I went to work, so what is the difference of a HS basketball player going to work for the nba straight out of high school.

DGPR
07-09-2008, 09:45 AM
Stern also needs to realize that Lebron James, Kobe Bryant, and Tracy McGrady didn't go to college and they are making his league tons of money.

rexnom
07-09-2008, 09:50 AM
How can a 16yr. old kid be drafted by the Oakland Athletics, but HSers cant be drafted by the NBA. Stern definitely needs to reconsider this. When I got out of high school I went to work, so what is the difference of a HS basketball player going to work for the nba straight out of high school.
The more appropriate question is, how come an 18-year-old can vote and enlist in the army but not play in the NBA?

esabyrn333
07-09-2008, 10:03 AM
How can a 16yr. old kid be drafted by the Oakland Athletics, but HSers cant be drafted by the NBA. Stern definitely needs to reconsider this. When I got out of high school I went to work, so what is the difference of a HS basketball player going to work for the nba straight out of high school.


So does everyone also think that the rule for the NFL is BS. You have to be a Jr before you can go to the NFL.

I like the rule because there was alot of Highschoolers that would enter the draft and not be selected at all.

At least this way they go to school or the D-league or europe if they so choose.

But alot of kids go to collage the think for a year and discover that they are not as good as they have been told by people and stay in school and get an education.

Personally I think it needs to be changed to 2 years. This gives the NBA to make better draft choices based on production instead of potintial. If the kids don't want to go to collage go the the NBDL that is why it was created. JMO

esabyrn333
07-09-2008, 10:09 AM
The more appropriate question is, how come an 18-year-old can vote and enlist in the army but not play in the NBA?

Or play in the NFL or drink beer or be the a doctor or lawyer or an officer in the military.

Plus if you want to get techinical they can join the NBA in the NBDL.

This is just like the military because you don't just join and go to war you join go to a 8 week boot camp, than a tech training school that can be anywhere from 4 weeks to a year or more.

I don't like this agrument because the are hundreds of jobs you can't just do out of highschool.

rexnom
07-09-2008, 10:19 AM
Or play in the NFL or drink beer or be the a doctor or lawyer or an officer in the military.

Plus if you want to get techinical they can join the NBA in the NBDL.

This is just like the military because you don't just join and go to war you join go to a 8 week boot camp, than a tech training school that can be anywhere from 4 weeks to a year or more.

I don't like this agrument because the are hundreds of jobs you can't just do out of highschool.
But the reason you can't do those jobs is because you aren't qualified. Some of these guys are qualified straight out of high school.

And the NCAA should not be the NBA's boot camp. What a horrible perversion of academia.

esabyrn333
07-09-2008, 10:28 AM
But the reason you can't do those jobs is because you aren't qualified. Some of these guys are qualified straight out of high school.

And the NCAA should not be the NBA's boot camp. What a horrible perversion of academia.

Thats why I am saying if they don't qualify for school they should go the the NBDL. This is also why I think it should be increased to 2 years. This would help the NCAA and NBA.

For every player ready to play out of high school there is 3 more that trys it and doesn't even see a roster

btowncolt
07-09-2008, 10:31 AM
I'm honestly surprised Nike or Reebok has not stepped up and offered the top 5 kids in each class a couple million if they train with that company for a year and agree to sign endorsement contracts with them - then the company can release video of the guys playing in a controlled environment. Less chance of injury, less chance of hurting your draft stock.

Major Cold
07-09-2008, 10:32 AM
aside from the debate I heard that he was not academically qualified to go to Arizona and would have to go to juco. If that is true I don't blame him. This opens a new can of worms. Mayo almost did this.

esabyrn333
07-09-2008, 10:34 AM
I'm honestly surprised Nike or Reebok has not stepped up and offered the top 5 kids in each class a couple million if they train with that company for a year and agree to sign endorsement contracts with them - then the company can release video of the guys playing in a controlled environment. Less chance of injury, less chance of hurting your draft stock.


Thats a Damn good Idea.....

btowncolt
07-09-2008, 10:38 AM
Thats a Damn good Idea.....

Probably wouldn't want to risk damaging their reputation with Stern - knowing they could sign the guys in a year anyway.

I'm just still a little surprised that so many of these guys actually have gone to college. There's very little upside for many of them - GMs still love potential....

rexnom
07-09-2008, 10:38 AM
Thats a Damn good Idea.....
I don't understand how you can think that's a good idea but that the NBA allowing 18-year-olds is somehow a bad one.

2minutes twowa
07-09-2008, 10:38 AM
Why not. Get paid, no classes, live abroad for a year, then enter the draft. Sounds good to me.

Kuq_e_Zi91
07-09-2008, 10:49 AM
I like that idea. The only problem I see is if these kids don't pan out in the NBA. They might be top 5 in high school, but we all remember Kwame Brown. There's risk in it for these companies like Nike or Reebok dishing out millions to high school kids who still haven't proven worthy on a higher level. Then there's Lebron James. He had a deal with Nike in high school and he worked pretty well for them but how many Lebron's are out there? Also, there's an issue of responsibility. You would be giving teenagers, some not even of legal age, millions of dollars. Some might not know what to do with it and then you have more problems. Interesting idea though.

btowncolt
07-09-2008, 10:53 AM
I like that idea. The only problem I see is if these kids don't pan out in the NBA. They might be top 5 in high school, but we all remember Kwame Brown. There's risk in it for these companies like Nike or Reebok dishing out millions to high school kids who still haven't proven worthy on a higher level. Then there's Lebron James. He had a deal with Nike in high school and he worked pretty well for them but how many Lebron's are out there? Also, there's an issue of responsibility. You would be giving teenagers, some not even of legal age, millions of dollars. Some might not know what to do with it and then you have more problems. Interesting idea though.

I'm talking post-graduation here; not about dealing with them in high school.

College just doesn't make a heck of a lot of sense for some of these guys - there should be better ways to go. A year of training and mentoring on life in the NBA would probably serve many better than college.

Of course, most of them will be high picks anyway and there are certain.....perks.....to the undergraduate life.

esabyrn333
07-09-2008, 11:02 AM
I don't understand how you can think that's a good idea but that the NBA allowing 18-year-olds is somehow a bad one.


Personally I would like to see guys stay 2 years in collage so that the game would be great to watch. Could you imagine all of these freshman drafted this year coming back next year to there collage teams.

I do believe it benefits the kids with life experince and development of there maturity.

Honestly though I'm just bored so I decided to play devil's advocate here its kinda boring reading a thread where everyone agree's with one side of an argument. I personally don't care one way or the other. :eek:

idioteque
07-09-2008, 11:06 AM
I think the no HS players in the NBA role is a joke. You can't really compare the NBA to the NFL in this situation at all IMHO. The NFL is by far the most physically demanding league in all of sports. As far as I know, the only player to even contest and try to work around the rule was Maurice Clarrett, and look how his NFL career turned out. Then, in the NBA, the best two players in the league right now didn't go to college.

It's a complete mockery of academia to suggest "these kids need an education" as a justification for the rule. I can't speak for every school, but the majority of the college basketball players at my alma mater (I knew a couple of them and heard about others) rarely went to class and had no intention to graduate. There was a strong group of kids on the team that did care: that's fine, college basketball is for them. But there is no reason for Arizona or any other school to commit a $30,000 scholarship to a kid who is never going to graduate from the school any maybe go to class 10 times the one year who is there, while at the same time, denying a scholarship to a lower-middle class kid with honor roll in high school from Phoenix because all scholarship funds have been used up.

But, of course, it's going to keep happening, the schools really don't care if the kid graduates or not, as long as he generated revenue for the school for that year.

That rule suggested where the kids just sign endorsement contracts out of HS is great. Who cares what Stern thinks, he's an ******* tyrannical ******* who won't be the commissioner forever. The Euroleague idea is good, but what team is going to want these kids for just one year? There are, however, some kids that could probably go there for 2-3 years and enter the draft when they're 20 or 21.

Kuq_e_Zi91
07-09-2008, 11:08 AM
Even with post graduation, their highest level of play would be in high school.

How would you train and mentor about life in the NBA? I think these kids need to be in the NBA to really understand it. Listening to a representative from Nike won't tell them everything they need to know. Business wise maybe, but definitely not coaching wise. If they're not going to want to sit through classes of academics, I doubt they want to be taught how to spend their newly acquired millions of dollars.

If I was a coach in the League, I'd rather have a draft pick mentored by Lute Olsen or Coach K than some suit from Nike.

btowncolt
07-09-2008, 11:14 AM
Not following the point you're trying to make with that first sentence. Only had 1 coffee today. One year of college does very little for most of these guys in terms of prepping for the NBA.

I think you underestimate Nike's resources. Why would they bring in "suits" when they can ask just about anyone in the industry to come in to work with them?

You can get much better coaching if you only have basketball to worry about every day. Eliminating the risk of dropping your stick from one bad year or a coach suddenly not liking how you fit in their system (or, say, making a bunch of illegal calls and blowing your team up) could be a boon to a number of potential lottery picks.

The physical training alone that comes from just a year of dedicated work where you only have basketball to worry about could do wonders for even mid-level prospects.

rexnom
07-09-2008, 11:15 AM
Even with post graduation, their highest level of play would be in high school.

How would you train and mentor about life in the NBA? I think these kids need to be in the NBA to really understand it. Listening to a representative from Nike won't tell them everything they need to know. Business wise maybe, but definitely not coaching wise. If they're not going to want to sit through classes of academics, I doubt they want to be taught how to spend their newly acquired millions of dollars.

If I was a coach in the League, I'd rather have a draft pick mentored by Lute Olsen or Coach K than some suit from Nike.
Then Lute Olsen or Coach K should be coaches for NBDL teams or some minor league team or even Nike/Reebok teams then. They have no place in academia unless they are teaching a class. I think baseball has a good system - draft the kids whenever they want to enter the draft (as long as they are 18 by the draft's registration cut-off). Then each team should be allowed the option of sending them to a minor league for an unrestricted number of years without the players filling a roster spot. It's just ridiculous to have academic institutions function as farming systems for the NBA.

EDIT: I think NBA teams should be allowed to rent players out also, like European clubs. It would be nice if we could sign Lorbek or Stanko and then rent him out to European clubs on an annual basis. We would then bring him over when we felt he was ready. Or, imagine the Pacers drafting Jennings and signing him to a 3-year deal. If he's ready, he can join immediately. If he's not/no room for him on the team, we could rent him out to an NBDL team (you don't even need affiliation) or a Euro team, both of which would be glad to have his talent for a year. Stern/NBA owners are just using the NCAA to groom their future players for free and the NCAA doesn't mind because, as DCP mentioned, colleges only care about money.

esabyrn333
07-09-2008, 11:19 AM
I. The Euroleague idea is good, but what team is going to want these kids for just one year? There are, however, some kids that could probably go there for 2-3 years and enter the draft when they're 20 or 21.

If I was one of these highschool kids this is what I would do. All that money and you get to tour europe for a year or maybe a little longer. Hell yea...Euro women are fun for a normal guy let alone a professional atholete....I would then pettion for them to set up teams in Thailand and the Philippines. If anyone has a chance to go to the Philippines you need to go....Juicy's for everyone. :dance::dance::dance:

btowncolt
07-09-2008, 11:23 AM
I think the European option's popularity hinges on what happens with Jennings - if he doesn't get PT and kills his draft stock, then no player would run the risk again.

If it becomes popular, it seems like a much better way to brace for life in the NBA than college could ever be. Not to mention you're thousands of miles away from the kind of people that often get some of these players into trouble.

esabyrn333
07-09-2008, 11:24 AM
EDIT: I think NBA teams should be allowed to rent players out also, like European clubs. It would be nice if we could sign Lorbek or Stanko and then rent him out to European clubs on an annual basis. We would then bring him over when we felt he was ready. Or, imagine the Pacers drafting Jennings and signing him to a 3-year deal. If he's ready, he can join immediately. If he's not/no room for him on the team, we could rent him out to an NBDL team (you don't even need affiliation) or a Euro team, both of which would be glad to have his talent for a year. Stern/NBA owners are just using the NCAA to groom their future players for free and the NCAA doesn't mind because, as DCP mentioned, colleges only care about money.

I like your Idea also...But I wonder if the collage game lost alot of this talent and didn't care so much about the money created by atholetics what the effect it would have on the normal non-athletic student that goes to school to get an education. I think that they would see a raise in the cost to attend the schools if this happened.

rexnom
07-09-2008, 11:27 AM
I like your Idea also...But I wonder if the collage game lost alot of this talent and didn't care so much about the money created by atholetics what the effect it would have on the normal non-athletic student that goes to school to get an education. I think that they would see a raise in the cost to attend the schools if this happened.
The NCAA is not around to keep tuition costs down.

Kuq_e_Zi91
07-09-2008, 11:31 AM
I think the European option's popularity hinges on what happens with Jennings - if he doesn't get PT and kills his draft stock, then no player would run the risk again.

If it becomes popular, it seems like a much better way to brace for life in the NBA than college could ever be. Not to mention you're thousands of miles away from the kind of people that often get some of these players into trouble.


Sold me on that. One of my biggest concerns was the money that they would be receiving and the choices they would make with it. Being away from distractions does help, unless they find new distractions wherever they go.

You probably would see an increase in tuition costs but there would also be an increase in available scholarships. Doesn't the tuition increase annually anyways? Or maybe that's just the economy these days...

d_c
07-09-2008, 01:04 PM
So Brandon Jennings is essentially doing what most European players do:The vast majority of Euro players don't go to college of any sort and start playing professionally at a very young age (16-20).

The only difference is that nobody makes a big deal out of it and don't get criticized by the likes of Dick Vitale and all that is righteous.

Good luck to Brandon. Good for him, giving the middle finger to an organization like the NCAA and getting paid for what he's doing instead of working for free. Hope it works out for him.

d_c
07-09-2008, 01:11 PM
If it becomes popular, it seems like a much better way to brace for life in the NBA than college could ever be. Not to mention you're thousands of miles away from the kind of people that often get some of these players into trouble.

Not to mention, everyone constantly says that Americans need to expose themselves to other cultures and know more in life than simply what's in their own country.

And now we have Brandon Jennings getting criticized for forcing himself to live/learn in a different culture and getting the type of exposure to another part of the world that a lot of Americans could stand getting exposed to.

It definitely is a risk on the part of Jennings, but he could definitely come away from this experience better prepared for real life than just spending all of 1 year in college, partying, being the bigman on campus and taking a bunch of easy classes at a school he probably wouldn't graduate from anyways.

owl
07-09-2008, 01:17 PM
Not following the point you're trying to make with that first sentence. Only had 1 coffee today. One year of college does very little for most of these guys in terms of prepping for the NBA.

I think you underestimate Nike's resources. Why would they bring in "suits" when they can ask just about anyone in the industry to come in to work with them?

You can get much better coaching if you only have basketball to worry about every day. Eliminating the risk of dropping your stick from one bad year or a coach suddenly not liking how you fit in their system (or, say, making a bunch of illegal calls and blowing your team up) could be a boon to a number of potential lottery picks.

The physical training alone that comes from just a year of dedicated work where you only have basketball to worry about could do wonders for even mid-level prospects.


What exactly is this basketball of which you speak? Where are they playing?
Unless it is organized, high quality play, then the player stagnates.

owl
07-09-2008, 01:19 PM
So Brandon Jennings is essentially doing what most European players do:The vast majority of Euro players don't go to college of any sort and start playing professionally at a very young age (16-20).

The only difference is that nobody makes a big deal out of it and don't get criticized by the likes of Dick Vitale and all that is righteous.

Good luck to Brandon. Good for him, giving the middle finger to an organization like the NCAA and getting paid for what he's doing instead of working for free. Hope it works out for him.

Last time I checked going to college is very expensive.

d_c
07-09-2008, 01:28 PM
Last time I checked going to college is very expensive.

Last time I checked, a $300,000 contract is worth more than $30,000 in college tuition/room/board (and a public school like UofA costs less than that).

btowncolt
07-09-2008, 01:28 PM
What exactly is this basketball of which you speak? Where are they playing?
Unless it is organized, high quality play, then the player stagnates.

I doubt a little start-up like Nike or Reebok could figure out those sorts of issues.

rexnom
07-09-2008, 02:05 PM
I know Beasley loved his time in Manhattan, Kansas but he easily could have gone to a European party city a la Barcelona, Paris, Rome, etc., made a million dollars and still be a top-two pick.

idioteque
07-09-2008, 07:04 PM
I know Beasley loved his time in Manhattan, Kansas but he easily could have gone to a European party city a la Barcelona, Paris, Rome, etc., made a million dollars and still be a top-two pick.

Hey now, they don't call it Manhappenin' for nothing.

Dece
07-10-2008, 12:44 AM
I honestly love this, I was talking about this before when we were debating the 19 rule wondering if it was possible.

I mean honestly if you're one of these kids, why play for 30k and earn that college all that prestige and money, when you can't earn yourself anything more out of it? Might just as well go make 10 to 50 times that in Europe. Let alone endorsement money they can make immediately because they don't have to dance around the whole "is he a professional" issue.