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View Full Version : The gift that keeps on giving: IU will lose 2 scholarships due to academics.



Vince Neil
07-02-2008, 02:38 PM
Academic failings cost IU 2 more scholarships
By Mark Alesia
Posted: July 2,

A The numerous players who left Indiana University's men's basketball team since last season ended will prompt the school to take a reduction of two scholarships for the upcoming season in anticipation of penalties related to the NCAA's Academic Progress Rate, a school spokesman said today.

Spokesman J.D. Campbell said that's in addition to a one-scholarship loss for 2008-09 previously imposed as self-punishment for rule-breaking under former coach Kelvin Sampson. That leaves IU with 10 scholarships available, nine of which are taken.

The reduced scholarships might not have a big impact given the late start new coach Tom Crean had to rebuild the roster, after many of the nation's top players had signed. It's unclear at what point Crean, hired April 1, recruited with the understanding that he would be losing three scholarships.


The APR has more severe "historical" penalties for chronic offenders. But IU associate athletic director Grace Calhoun said through Campbell that "we don't anticipate further penalties going forward."

IU has one scholarship player returning from last season -- Kyle Taber, formerly a walk-on.

Crean has eight scholarship players available for the upcoming season, plus a transfer who has to sit out a year and will be eligible in 2009-10. That counts as nine scholarships for 2008-09.

The APR measures the retention and eligibility of players. Teams can lose scholarships if their score is below a certain threshold and they have a player who left school and wouldn't have been academically eligible for sports had he stayed. In men's basketball, two scholarship losses is the maximum penalty.

The APR was designed to be a more current measure of academic performance than graduation rates. It is a percentage score over a rolling four-year period.

Teams below a certain score are susceptible to historical penalties. IU was below that threshold in 2004-05 and 2005-06, but not punished because of other factors. In 2004-05, teams received a statistical allowance for the small sample size as the APR was getting started. In 2005-06, IU received a waiver from the NCAA because the Hoosiers' single-season score improved significantly.

That means IU has yet to receive the "occasion one" historical penalty, which is a warning. Teams below the threshold for two straight years receive scholarship and practice restrictions. For three straight years, it's a postseason ban in addition to scholarship and practice restrictions. For four straight years, the athletic department is in jeopardy of losing its membership status in the NCAA.

At Marquette, Crean's APR score ranked 91st out of 337 Division
The APR has more severe "historical" penalties for chronic offenders. But IU associate athletic director Grace Calhoun said through Campbell that "we don't anticipate further penalties going forward."

The impact of IU's NCAA infractions case on scholarships for the upcoming season is unclear. It appears highly unlikely the case will be resolved before the academic year begins. IU, Sampson and former assistant Rob Senderoff are accused of five potential major violations.

IU has one scholarship player returning from last season -- Kyle Taber, formerly a walk-on.

New coach Tom Crean has eight scholarship players available for the upcoming season, plus a transfer who has to sit out a year and will be eligible in 2009-10. That counts as nine scholarships for 2008-09.

The APR measures the retention and eligibility of players. Teams can lose scholarships if their score is below a certain threshold and they have a player who left school and wouldn't have been academically eligible for sports had he stayed. In men's basketball, two scholarship losses is the maximum penalty.

The APR was designed to be a more current measure of academic performance than graduation rates. It is a percentage score over a rolling four-year period.

Teams below a certain score are susceptible to historical penalties. IU was below that threshold in 2004-05 and 2005-06, but not punished because of other factors. In 2004-05, teams received a statistical allowance for the small sample size as the APR was getting started. In 2005-06, IU received a waiver from the NCAA because the Hoosiers' single-season score improved significantly.

That means IU has yet to receive the "occasion one" historical penalty, which is a warning. Teams below the threshold for two straight years receive scholarship and practice restrictions. For three straight years, it's a postseason ban in addition to scholarship and practice restrictions. For four straight years, the athletic department is in jeopardy of losing its membership status in the NCAA.

At Marquette, Crean's APR score ranked 91st out of 337 Division
The APR has more severe "historical" penalties for chronic offenders. But IU associate athletic director Grace Calhoun said through Campbell that "we don't anticipate further penalties going forward."

The impact of IU's NCAA infractions case on scholarships for the upcoming season is unclear. It appears highly unlikely the case will be resolved before the academic year begins. IU, Sampson and former assistant Rob Senderoff are accused of five potential major violations.

IU has one scholarship player returning from last season -- Kyle Taber, formerly a walk-on.

New coach Tom Crean has eight scholarship players available for the upcoming season, plus a transfer who has to sit out a year and will be eligible in 2009-10. That counts as nine scholarships for 2008-09.

The APR measures the retention and eligibility of players. Teams can lose scholarships if their score is below a certain threshold and they have a player who left school and wouldn't have been academically eligible for sports had he stayed. In men's basketball, two scholarship losses is the maximum penalty.

The APR was designed to be a more current measure of academic performance than graduation rates. It is a percentage score over a rolling four-year period.

Teams below a certain score are susceptible to historical penalties. IU was below that threshold in 2004-05 and 2005-06, but not punished because of other factors. In 2004-05, teams received a statistical allowance for the small sample size as the APR was getting started. In 2005-06, IU received a waiver from the NCAA because the Hoosiers' single-season score improved significantly.

That means IU has yet to receive the "occasion one" historical penalty, which is a warning. Teams below the threshold for two straight years receive scholarship and practice restrictions. For three straight years, it's a postseason ban in addition to scholarship and practice restrictions. For four straight years, the athletic department is in jeopardy of losing its membership status in the NCAA.

At Marquette, Crean's APR score ranked 91st out of 337 Division I schools.

http://www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080702/SPORTS0601/80702046

Trader Joe
07-02-2008, 02:47 PM
I hate my sports fan life. :suicide2:

Shade
07-02-2008, 02:51 PM
This is almost funny at this point. :shakehead

ABADays
07-02-2008, 02:55 PM
Was the repetition of the story in the first post for clarity or emphasis?

indygeezer
07-02-2008, 02:59 PM
Another ......Failure to Monitor.


(hiding behind the curtain....OK IU, do not name a new AD until After the NCAA announces the sanctions....and then hire Bob Knight as AD.)


I just wanna see Miles Brand have a caniption.

PacerPete
07-02-2008, 03:18 PM
I'm a Purdue grad (twice) and this just continues to sicken the hell out of me. If sampson was on my front porch right now I'd kick his a$$. I can't possibly imagine how an IU grad feels.

SycamoreKen
07-03-2008, 10:22 PM
They weren't using those anyway were they. Don't they have like 10 walk ons?

jeffg-body
07-04-2008, 12:10 AM
I'm a Purdue grad (twice) and this just continues to sicken the hell out of me. If sampson was on my front porch right now I'd kick his a$$. I can't possibly imagine how an IU grad feels.


I can tell you it feels like a drop kick to the groin, but one that lasts about a month.:eek: