PDA

View Full Version : How long before you get engaged



Unclebuck
05-30-2008, 02:00 PM
update post #55 - to answer my own question - obviously not long enough


I have a question: How long should you wait after you meet someone before you get engaged.

NO, no, it is not for me, it really isn't, but I have a really good friend who just got engaged after only knowing her for 3 months. Granted they are both in their mid-30's, and I realize as you get older you know more of exactly what you want. But still I think it is entirely way too early. And because of school, work and living about an hour part, they really haven't spent that much time together.

My friend also just got divorced about 8 months ago or so, and was really a wreck over it emotionally. But one reason his prior marriage didn't work out is because they rushed into it way, way to quickly and I fear he is repeating the same mistake.

For me personally, I would not think about getting engaged for at least 1 year, and then I would still have a good 6 to 12 month engagement.

Am I crazy - what are your thoughts

Shade
05-30-2008, 02:07 PM
There isn't really a right answer.

I know someone who was dating someone else for 6 years and they just recently got engaged.

I know someone else who ended up splitting up with his gf after about the same time period.

And one of my closest friends got married only a year after he met his wife, and they seem like about as close to a perfect couple as you can get.

Personally, my belief is that if you feel you know someone as well as you possibly can, and you feel like you can live with that person for the rest of your life, accepting their faults as a part of who they are (rather than hoping to change them with time, which is a mistake a looooot of people make), then you're good to go.

I have also found that most people seem to change into who they're going to be for the most part in their early 20s or so. At least, from my experience. I know I'm a hell of a lot different than I was in my early 20s as well.

Gyron
05-30-2008, 02:15 PM
It all depends on the person. My wife and I dated 2 years before getting engaged. We lived together a year before we got engaged. And then we were engaged a year before we got married.

We've been married now for over 10 years. So I think we did it the right way for us. It also helped that we were like best friends for about 6 months before we started dating too.

Unclebuck
05-30-2008, 02:25 PM
It all depends on the person. My wife and I dated 2 years before getting engaged. We lived together a year before we got engaged. And then we were engaged a year before we got married.

We've been married now for over 10 years. So I think we did it the right way for us. It also helped that we were like best friends for about 6 months before we started dating too.

I am a huge believer in being best friends first.

Let me ask another question though, how long does it take to get to know someone. Some people can fool you. I say at least 6 months and that is only if you are with that person in all types of situations. Also important to be with someone in the normal everyday type situations - just being with someone on the weekends or in vacation situations well you really dont learn as much about someone.

I'm not a big believer in the living together thing, but for practical reasons I could see where that might be a good idea.

You two haven't helped me much though, you are supposed to say 3 months is way to soon to be engaged

Gyron
05-30-2008, 02:33 PM
I can't say that Buck. My Brother only knew his wife for a few months before they got engaged, and he and his wife are one of the happiest couples I have ever met. And I have to admit, she's one hell of a girl, looks, brians and all. They've been married about 4 years now.

Twes
05-30-2008, 02:40 PM
3 months is waaaaaaaaaay too soon.

Unless she's really really hot. And rich. In a deep, spirital connection sort of way.

Unclebuck
05-30-2008, 02:46 PM
I can't say that Buck. My Brother only knew his wife for a few months before they got engaged, and he and his wife are one of the happiest couples I have ever met. And I have to admit, she's one hell of a girl, looks, brians and all. They've been married about 4 years now.

That is a good point. But then why not just get engaged 1 or 2 weeks after meeting - they may end up being the happiest couple ever. I guess just because it worked out great for them doesn't prove that it was the best decision for them even. (not sure I am explaining myself) are you saying if they would have waited another 6 months that things would be different today? No of course not. But there are a lot of couples who get married way too soon. if it is right it is right, but you have a much better chance of knowing that at month 8 then at month 3.


My friend and his fiance are not in a good financial situation, in fact he owes me a lot of money

Vince Neil
05-30-2008, 02:47 PM
I have a question: How long should you wait after you meet someone before you get engaged.

NO, no, it is not for me, it really isn't, but I have a really good friend who just got engaged after only knowing her for 3 months. Granted they are both in their mid-30's, and I realize as you get older you know more of exactly what you want. But still I think it is entirely way too early. And because of school, work and living about an hour part, they really haven't spent that much time together.

My friend also just got divorced about 8 months ago or so, and was really a wreck over it emotionally. But one reason his prior marriage didn't work out is because they rushed into it way, way to quickly and I fear he is repeating the same mistake.

For me personally, I would not think about getting engaged for at least 1 year, and then I would still have a good 6 to 12 month engagement.

Am I crazy - what are your thoughts

My wife and I got engaged after 4 yrs of dating and have been married now for 15 yrs.

3 months way too soon in my opinion, especially since he just got divorced (8 friggin' months ago!!!!!!!!! Yikes!). This sounds like a "rebound" relationship to me.

How long before you got engaged 'Buck?

Shade
05-30-2008, 02:54 PM
Personally, I have a hard time believing you can get to know a person well enough to make a life decision in only three months. But it's not impossible.

Unclebuck
05-30-2008, 02:55 PM
How long before you got engaged 'Buck?

I've been engaged to the Pacers for about 24 years now. And I waited at least 3 or 4 years before I decided the Pacers were the thing for me, I checked out the NFL, MLB, college football, the NCAA, I dated around, but then after a proper period of time I decided it was time

Shade
05-30-2008, 03:00 PM
I've been engaged to the Pacers for about 24 years now. And I waited at least 3 or 4 years before I decided the Pacers were the thing for me, I checked out the NFL, MLB, college football, the NCAA, I dated around, but then after a proper period of time I decided it was time

No offense, but she's really let herself go the last few years. ;) :(

avoidingtheclowns
05-30-2008, 03:02 PM
My friend and his fiance are not in a good financial situation, in fact he owes me a lot of money

you're one to talk about obscene amounts of outstanding debt...



I've been engaged to the Pacers for about 24 years now. And I waited at least 3 or 4 years before I decided the Pacers were the thing for me, I checked out the NFL, MLB, college football, the NCAA, I dated around, but then after a proper period of time I decided it was time

given your reservations about living together before marriage, i'm really stunned that you don't mind sharing your partner -- seems pretty kinky for you.

Shade
05-30-2008, 03:07 PM
you're one to talk about obscene amounts of outstanding debt...

Actually, this explains why UB has been gambling so much; to try to win the back the lost money from his friend. ;)

bellisimo
05-30-2008, 03:15 PM
3 months? oh talk about jumping the gun there - sometimes it takes me 3 months just to get into a relationship...

it sounds to me as if its more about not being alone than wanting to be together with each other...which is understandable to a degree...but 3 months is way too soon...that is of course they get engaged now and don't really get married for 5 more years...

Unclebuck
05-30-2008, 03:38 PM
I'm not sure if they have a date set or if he gave her a ring (I haven't spoken to him yet, just got an e-mail) But knowing him, they are probably getting married the Saturday before Father's day (with my money!!)

sweabs
05-30-2008, 03:46 PM
you are supposed to say 3 months is way to soon to be engaged

3 months is way too soon to be engaged (seriously).

Hicks
05-30-2008, 03:57 PM
My experiences around people who are married is that MOST of the time 3 months is way too soon, but I've seen it work out before.

Unclebuck
05-30-2008, 04:04 PM
You have to get to know the person on good days and bad days. How do they act when they are sick, how do they act when you are sick, how do they react to really hot weather, really cold weather.

Maybe I should give my friend the link to this thread.

No, I really can't say anything - first it won't do any good, second he hasn't asked for my advice, third I want to stay friends with the guy (so I get my money back at least)

avoidingtheclowns
05-30-2008, 04:28 PM
I'm not sure if they have a date set or if he gave her a ring (I haven't spoken to him yet, just got an e-mail) But knowing him, they are probably getting married the Saturday before Father's day (with my money!!)

okay -- so it isn't just a short dating period it is also an incredibly short engagement period too. why not just go all shotgun wedding in vegas? i'm sure if they involved gambling you could get behind this holy disastrimony.

grace
05-30-2008, 04:37 PM
There's no answer to that question because it depends on the people involved. My cousin got engaged after dating his wife to be for 3 months. Needless to say my aunt was more than not happy about it. They were engaged for probably 9 months before they got married. In October they'll be celebrating their 32nd wedding anniversary.

And then there's my other cousin who lived with her boyfriend for a few years before they got married. It's been one disaster after another. They should have been divorced at least one kid ago.




(Note to Kegboy: I know you know who the 2nd cousin is. The first is Gary.)

Los Angeles
05-30-2008, 04:37 PM
After about 6 months to a year, the sex/gushy/butterfly/infatuation stage kind of mellows out. When it does, sometimes that "other side" of someone that they've been keeping in check will pop out and say hello.

You know, the needlessly jealous part of someone, or the cheap part of someone, or the overly needy part.

So keeping that cycle in mind, I wouldn't even consider engagement until at least a year has gone by without red flags.

If you are still both fantastically in love and fantastically compatible after two years, that's a green light in my book.

Peck
05-30-2008, 05:32 PM
The 3 months is not nearly the concern, the 8 months post a traumatic divorce is.

However engaged does not mean married, so if they are engaged to each other for a good while then it might work out.

My wife and I dated for about 4 years before being married but we might as well have been engaged the entire time & we just celebrated 22 years of being married this past Saturday.

Los Angeles
05-30-2008, 07:31 PM
Happy Anniversary, Peck!

idioteque
05-30-2008, 11:11 PM
It really really really really depends on the person. From what you're saying it's much too short of a time based off of his past experience, but then again I don't know him at all either.

My parents, lets just say they didn't know each other very well and I was the reason they got married, and they actually just celebrated their 22nd anniversary. Look at my age to the left of this message and do the math... I think when you you look at the circumstances though there was probably a 1:1,000 chance of that working out at all. And they're actually very happy and very stable. Many of my friends parents would downright scare me with their arguments growing up, but my parents never did that publicly or hardly at all (according to my Mom).

Eindar
05-31-2008, 03:57 AM
Three months is too short. I find statements like, "it depends on the person" to be a cop out. There is absolutely no way you will know enough about a particular human being in three months to know unequivocally that you want to spend the rest of your life with them.

Those of you talking about success stories involving people who didn't date very long? Hey, even a blind squirrel finds a nut every once in a while. It can work, but when it does, it's nothing more than blind luck.

Also, this may sound a little contradictory to my earlier position, but I also feel like long-term dating won't prove to you that this person is right for you, but it will show you if they're wrong for you. It's kinda like the NFL Combine. It doesn't show us who will be great, but it does show us who won't. :)

I'd say that if after 1 year of seeing them regularly (> once per week), you're still crazy about them, go ahead and move in together. If that works out great for a year, get engaged, and if that works out great for a year, get married. Or, if you don't like the idea of co-habitation, wait 2-3 years. By that time, you still won't know if someone is perfect for you, but you'll have an idea of who they are as a person. Regardless, the most important factor on the success or failure of a marriage is the ability to compromise, and the resolve of the two individuals to stick with it when it gets a little tough.

SycamoreKen
05-31-2008, 01:44 PM
My wife and I met in September, got engaged Christmas Eve, And were married in July. we will be celebrating our 11th wedding anniversery this year. I think what matters most is the maturaty level and the commitment of the people going into the marrage.

I don't think or even agree with people having to live together before they get married. If you spend enough time with each other that is irrelevant. Almost all of the poeple I know that have been married for 30+ years never lived together before they were married.

Hicks
05-31-2008, 02:30 PM
I also don't think you need to have practically psycho-analyzed every facet of your spouse before getting married, either. If you need to in order to get a sense of who they are, then OK I guess, but I don't think everyone feels like they need to know every last detail of that person before they want to be with them long-term. Which is NOT to say that you want to go in knowing hardly anything.

btowncolt
05-31-2008, 02:39 PM
If you asked me Unclebuck, I would do it today.

SycamoreKen
05-31-2008, 03:12 PM
I agree Hicks. One will never know eerything about one's spouse, and one should expect to have to change when the two of you become one. I find out things about my wife all the time I never knew. She does the same about me. I also find there are things I have to change and grow in to insure we stay on the same page and happy together.

Putnam
05-31-2008, 04:04 PM
I think what matters most is the maturity level and the commitment of the people going into the marriage.

Exactly.

I went on exactly zero dates with my wife, and married her 8 months after we met. I didn't talk to her on the telephone until we'd been married nearly 2 years. That was 22 years ago.

Maturity and commitment are what you need.

Eindar
05-31-2008, 11:37 PM
Exactly.

I went on exactly zero dates with my wife, and married her 8 months after we met. I didn't talk to her on the telephone until we'd been married nearly 2 years. That was 22 years ago.

Maturity and commitment are what you need.

And in your case, a whopping dollop of luck. She could have been an axe murderer for all you knew. Or, more realistically, she could have been horrible with money or had a secret drinking/drug problem, neither of which would have come to light until you'd known her a bit longer than 8 months.

Maturity and commitment are important, but I question anyone's ability to definitively determine that quality in their future spouse within a year or two. I feel like the courting process is about "feeling out" the other person. It's a time where you determine if this person's flaws are something that you can live with, because getting into a marriage hoping someone will change is a sure-fire way to end up in divorce court.

Another thing, I can make a marriage to a chimpanzee work, that doesn't mean I'll be happy for the rest of my life. There are lots of people who are married and miserable out there, and are just making it work. I intend to be happy and also make it work.

Hicks
06-01-2008, 10:49 AM
Remember though that everyone is different, including the guys and what they need in terms of "feeling things out", etc.

Putnam
06-01-2008, 01:58 PM
My first comments aimed only to point out the brevity of the time I knew my wife. the OP asks "how long" and I was agreeing with Ken that maturity and commitment matter more than a set length of time.

I didn't mean to suggest that I didn't know my wife very well before we were married. We met during Peace Corps training, and after 8 weeks of training were deployed to different stations. We never had occasion to go on dates, but we wrote copious letter (writing almost every night, and sending thick bundles of letters when we could find a courier in a country with no mail service.) So, I never knew much about how my future wife would behave on a roller coaster or at a rock concert, but I knew pretty much everything about her values and opinions and priorities in life.

Eindar describes courtship as a "feeling-out process." I think he is probably right in most courtships, and correct that many failed marriages could have and should have been avoided through a lengthier process of feeling-out.

Feeling-out is helpful for deciding it isn't going to work. When it does work the way it should, everything necessary is contained in the wedding vows. If people would enter into marriage as seriously as it deserves (with the maturity and commitment that Ken suggested) then bad marriages would be very rare, and divorce ever rarer.

It seems to take a long time to determine whether it is going to "work out" with a potential spouse because dating is such an unnatural exercise. It tells you very little about what the other person is really like: how she behaves when you take her out to a restaurant tells you nothing about how she would manage a household.

Unclebuck
06-01-2008, 08:16 PM
He's getting married September 20th. I pray it works out between them. I didn't say a negative word to him, he's getting enough of that from his family.......

Naptown_Seth
06-01-2008, 08:39 PM
I'm not sure if they have a date set or if he gave her a ring (I haven't spoken to him yet, just got an e-mail) But knowing him, they are probably getting married the Saturday before Father's day (with my money!!)
Wasn't this a Curb Your Enthusiasm plot. He loaned a guy money for another reason and instead he used it for a wedding that I think Larry wasn't even invited to.

Eindar
06-01-2008, 11:32 PM
My first comments aimed only to point out the brevity of the time I knew my wife. the OP asks "how long" and I was agreeing with Ken that maturity and commitment matter more than a set length of time.

I didn't mean to suggest that I didn't know my wife very well before we were married. We met during Peace Corps training, and after 8 weeks of training were deployed to different stations. We never had occasion to go on dates, but we wrote copious letter (writing almost every night, and sending thick bundles of letters when we could find a courier in a country with no mail service.) So, I never knew much about how my future wife would behave on a roller coaster or at a rock concert, but I knew pretty much everything about her values and opinions and priorities in life.

Eindar describes courtship as a "feeling-out process." I think he is probably right in most courtships, and correct that many failed marriages could have and should have been avoided through a lengthier process of feeling-out.

Feeling-out is helpful for deciding it isn't going to work. When it does work the way it should, everything necessary is contained in the wedding vows. If people would enter into marriage as seriously as it deserves (with the maturity and commitment that Ken suggested) then bad marriages would be very rare, and divorce ever rarer.

It seems to take a long time to determine whether it is going to "work out" with a potential spouse because dating is such an unnatural exercise. It tells you very little about what the other person is really like: how she behaves when you take her out to a restaurant tells you nothing about how she would manage a household.

Lots of good stuff here, and I agree that dating, as in, let's go out to eat and to a movie, is pretty much worthless, other than it kindles those warm, goofy feelings that you need to make it to the next step.

I guess I should revise my statement to be: How long is long enough? As long as it takes to know you're willing to spend the rest of your life with them, hell or high water, and can be happy with that decision as well.

I just don't think that anyone's a good enough judge of character to make that kind of decision after three months, much less two people being able to independently make that decision about each other. At three months, you're doing a little bit of hoping. Also, most people take more than three months to research their next car purchase, and that's usually only a 5-10 year commitment :)

Unclebuck
06-02-2008, 09:23 AM
Three months is too short. I find statements like, "it depends on the person" to be a cop out. There is absolutely no way you will know enough about a particular human being in three months to know unequivocally that you want to spend the rest of your life with them.

Those of you talking about success stories involving people who didn't date very long? Hey, even a blind squirrel finds a nut every once in a while. It can work, but when it does, it's nothing more than blind luck.

Also, this may sound a little contradictory to my earlier position, but I also feel like long-term dating won't prove to you that this person is right for you, but it will show you if they're wrong for you. It's kinda like the NFL Combine. It doesn't show us who will be great, but it does show us who won't. :)

I'd say that if after 1 year of seeing them regularly (> once per week), you're still crazy about them, go ahead and move in together. If that works out great for a year, get engaged, and if that works out great for a year, get married. Or, if you don't like the idea of co-habitation, wait 2-3 years. By that time, you still won't know if someone is perfect for you, but you'll have an idea of who they are as a person. Regardless, the most important factor on the success or failure of a marriage is the ability to compromise, and the resolve of the two individuals to stick with it when it gets a little tough.

Eindar, I agree with all of your post here 100%

I met with my friend last night and I sensed that he is getting some negative feedback from his family. And yes he did buy her a ring and is making installment payments. Someone told me once you should spend about 1 months income on an ring, of course he was a guy and very conservative with his money. Also heard the theory that you should spend about 6 months income on a ring. (I don't think so)

Thanks for all the good responses in this thread

grace
06-02-2008, 01:05 PM
Someone told me once you should spend about 1 months income on an ring, of course he was a guy and very conservative with his money. Also heard the theory that you should spend about 6 months income on a ring. (I don't think so)


Personally I think you should spend what you can afford on a ring. Having said that I know my brother paid for his wife's ring on the installment plan. It's been 16 years. I'm pretty sure he's paid it off by now.

Unclebuck
06-02-2008, 01:22 PM
Personally I think you should spend what you can afford on a ring. Having said that I know my brother paid for his wife's ring on the installment plan. It's been 16 years. I'm pretty sure he's paid it off by now.

I think the payments should last at least as long as the marriage

Gyron
06-02-2008, 01:23 PM
I used a coupon and bought my wifes ring on sale........

Putnam
06-02-2008, 03:08 PM
I hate to say this.

My wife's was made in Liberia and cost practically nothing. That was before they called them "Blood Diamonds" and it was considered bad form to buy them.

JayRedd
06-02-2008, 05:58 PM
Wasn't this a Curb Your Enthusiasm plot. He loaned a guy money for another reason and instead he used it for a wedding that I think Larry wasn't even invited to.

I think it was a birthday party.

Twes
06-02-2008, 07:26 PM
Personally I think you should spend what you can afford on a ring. Having said that I know my brother paid for his wife's ring on the installment plan. It's been 16 years. I'm pretty sure he's paid it off by now.

Wow.

:ballchain:

317Kim
06-02-2008, 08:23 PM
Gee. This was an interesting thread to read because I'd been pondering these things every now and then.

With that said, how young is too young to get engaged?

My boyfriend and I have been dating for about a year and a half and we're not thinking about it now, but just for future references is all.

Bball
06-02-2008, 10:14 PM
3 months and then get engaged.... Well, to each his own I guess.

But I think the wedding date is the real problem. THAT is what is too soon.

...But then what do I know.

-Bball

rexnom
06-03-2008, 09:35 AM
Isn't age a factor? And what you are doing at the time? I just don't think I could afford an engagement, or more importantly, a wedding and marriage, until after I'm done with my Ph. D. and I'm in my late 20s at least. I've been with my girlfriend for almost two years and we're living together but still...If I met her after all my schooling was done and I had a solid job then I would have no problem getting engaged after two years (or maybe even a few months). Now it just seems way too soon.

Peck
06-07-2008, 02:50 AM
Gee. This was an interesting thread to read because I'd been pondering these things every now and then.

With that said, how young is too young to get engaged?

My boyfriend and I have been dating for about a year and a half and we're not thinking about it now, but just for future references is all.

There is no one real answer for this. It all depends on both people and their commitment to each other.

I was married at 18 and I just celebrated my 22 Wedding anniversary. However a friend of mines daughter was married at 18 and her's did not even last 4 months.

It totally depends on both people's commitment to each other and a mutual long term goals.

Twes
06-07-2008, 06:41 AM
I was married at 19 and widowed a year and a half later.

I married again 11 years ago in my early 30's.

We were together quite some time before we got engaged and then it was awhile before the wedding.

It's all a blur. There's no set rule. It has more to do with the people, maturity, commitment, compatibility etc.

I think too many people enter into marriage lightly and jump out far too quickly, but at some point if it feels right you just have to go for it.

I hope it works. Best of luck to you guys.

idioteque
06-07-2008, 11:33 AM
Isn't age a factor? And what you are doing at the time? I just don't think I could afford an engagement, or more importantly, a wedding and marriage, until after I'm done with my Ph. D. and I'm in my late 20s at least.

Ah, Rex, you're so GW. :) You can get married at the local courthouse for relatively nothing.

The one good thing I see about getting married and starting out early? You aren't like 60 when your kids are in HS. My parents are in their mid 40's and have the rest of their lives to themselves.

jeffg-body
06-07-2008, 11:45 AM
Just from my experience I was engaged 2 times before my wife and I were engaged. IMO if your age has "teen" in it that is too early. I dated my wife for about 2 years and we lived together a year before we were engaged. It has been 10 years since our wedding now.

Los Angeles
06-07-2008, 01:40 PM
I was married at 19 and widowed a year and a half later.


I'm sorry for your loss, Twes. I can't imagine what that must have been like.

Twes
06-12-2008, 08:40 AM
I'm sorry for your loss, Twes. I can't imagine what that must have been like.

Thanks.

ABADays
06-12-2008, 01:44 PM
I am a huge believer in being best friends first.

Let me ask another question though, how long does it take to get to know someone. Some people can fool you. I say at least 6 months and that is only if you are with that person in all types of situations. Also important to be with someone in the normal everyday type situations - just being with someone on the weekends or in vacation situations well you really dont learn as much about someone.

I'm not a big believer in the living together thing, but for practical reasons I could see where that might be a good idea.

You two haven't helped me much though, you are supposed to say 3 months is way to soon to be engaged

Wow. I think it takes a lifetime to get to know someone. Every year presents new challenges and external pressures and with that comes changes in a couples dynamics. Marriage is tough. A marriage with children can be even tougher. But the rewards are worth it. If you don't have a commitment to it it's easy to just throw it away.

I think of it this way. Of all the people you come across in your life, you are lucky to really KNOW only a few.

Gyron
06-12-2008, 01:56 PM
Twes, I just read that about your first wife. I am so sorry to hear that. I just can't imagine what that would have been like, especially at that age....

Twes
06-12-2008, 01:58 PM
Twes, I just read that about your first wife. I am so sorry to hear that. I just can't imagine what that would have been like, especially at that age....

It's like anything... you take care of what's before you and keep going forward.

Thanks. That was a long time ago.

Unclebuck
09-04-2008, 10:31 AM
Son-of-a-*****.

Just to update this story. I hadn't heard from my friend in about 6 weeks, figured he was really busy with the wedding planning and all - well just a little bit ago I received a voice mail that he is no longer with his fiance and oh by the way she is pregnant. She broke up with him.

(I rest my case with the it "being too soon to be engaged" comment - should also add -"too soon for sex as well" - but that is another issue.

I have no idea what happened (Was wondering why I hadn't received a wedding invitation). When I saw that he called me this morning - I figured something was up - and it probably wasn't good. This sucks

Putnam
09-04-2008, 11:48 AM
The question was a very good one, and there are as many valid answers as people. But, in this instance, Unclebuck saw it coming.

Don't ya just hate being right sometimes?

ilive4sports
09-04-2008, 12:28 PM
I dont think there is a right answer, but usually, longer seems to work better. Hell my parents dated for 3 weeks or something and then got engaged and 6 months later got married. Later this month they will be celebrating their 25th anniversary. My brother was dating a girl for a little over 6 months and had known her for a over a year when they got engaged. Then right before the wedding everything got called off.

Sorry to hear about your friend UncleBuck. Its not an easy thing as I have witnessed with my brother.

Los Angeles
09-04-2008, 04:39 PM
Shocker of the century. I hope he does right by his child.

Good luck and Godspeed to your friend. Life gets pretty weird sometimes.