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View Full Version : Incredible pictures of one of Earth's last uncontacted tribes firing bows and arrows



bellisimo
05-30-2008, 08:39 AM
Skin painted bright red, heads partially shaved, arrows drawn back in the longbows and aimed square at the aircraft buzzing overhead. The gesture is unmistakable: Stay Away.

Behind the two men stands another figure, possibly a woman, her stance also seemingly defiant. Her skin painted dark, nearly black.

The apparent aggression shown by these people is quite understandable. For they are members of one of Earth's last uncontacted tribes, who live in the Envira region in the thick rainforest along the Brazilian-Peruvian frontier.
Thought never to have had any contact with the outside world, everything about these people is, and hopefully will remain, a mystery.


Visit link for more information....

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1022822/Incredible-pictures-Earths-uncontacted-tribes-firing-bows-arrows.html





http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2008/05/29/article-1022822-016B043900000578-706_468x350.jpg

http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2008/05/30/article-1022822-016C54D300000578-839_468x314.jpg

http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2008/05/30/article-1022822-016C568F00000578-370_468x308.jpg

http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2008/05/30/article-1022822-016B054900000578-795_468x286.jpg

http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2008/05/30/article-1022822-016C561900000578-8_468x301.jpg

Hicks
05-30-2008, 08:48 AM
Interesting.

bellisimo
05-30-2008, 08:51 AM
now Mel Gibson doesn't have to worry about finding his actors for Apocalypto II

SoupIsGood
05-30-2008, 08:58 AM
I bet those guys would like to do some countin'.

LoneGranger33
05-30-2008, 09:00 AM
That's friggin' awesome. Too bad the rainforest won't last.

Arcadian
05-30-2008, 09:07 AM
By seeing an aircraft having they been contacted? I would love to see what their morning paper's headline will be: Mole People Come from the Sky.

travmil
05-30-2008, 09:11 AM
Obviously, the folks in the planes have never heard of the Prime Directive...

idioteque
05-30-2008, 09:43 AM
They will have contact with other people in the next 25 years. The way the rainforest is melting away? It's inevitable.

Also I found some more information about this yesterday and I can't find the source now, but there are said to be about 100 uncontacted tribes around the world.

bellisimo
05-30-2008, 09:54 AM
By seeing an aircraft having they been contacted? I would love to see what their morning paper's headline will be: Mole People Come from the Sky.

FTA: The tribespeople are likely to think the plane that took this photograph is a spirit or large bird


Also I found some more information about this yesterday and I can't find the source now, but there are said to be about 100 uncontacted tribes around the world.

once again FTA:
It is extraordinary to think that, in 2008, there remain about a hundred groups of people, scattered over the Earth, who know nothing of our world and we nothing of theirs, save a handful of brief encounters.
The uncontacted tribes, which are located in the jungles of South America, New Guinea and a remote and the beautiful and remote North Sentinel island in the Indian Ocean (the inhabitants of which have also responded to attempts at contact with extreme aggression) all have one thing in common - they want to be left alone.
And for good reason. The history of contact, between indigenous tribes and the outside world, has always been an unhappy one.

Gyron
05-30-2008, 10:34 AM
I hope people leave them alone. I mean, why spoil what they have there.

Leave them be.

Can you imagine the time it takes to paint your body everyday though....

It appeared there were at least 3 colors. There was one guy who was completely black, a couple who were red, a couple who were orange. I wonder if thats like hiearchy in their tribe?

Or maybe thats how you tell your family apart. Hi, Nice to meet you, we're the "purple" Neighbors.

indygeezer
05-30-2008, 11:10 AM
What's all the excitement about. That's just an aerial photo I had taken of Spicoli's new house. His neighbors came out to wave at us as we flew over in the chopper.

Twes
05-30-2008, 11:12 AM
I just wish we could pan in and get a better look at the rack on that chick.

It wouldn't be so funny if one of those sumb bit ches had invented a 50 cal.

I think it's a meth lab.

Those guys are trippin big time.

They'll be tellin this story at the head shrinking parties for years.

indygeezer
05-30-2008, 11:33 AM
That one red dude looks to be holding one heckuva bazooka.


Funny how even the "uncontacted" peoples all have developed bows and arrows. I could prolly make a killing selling 'em PSE equipment.

Anyone wanna be the point man on this venture?

Gyron
05-30-2008, 11:38 AM
Geezer, its obvious they need a real estate agent there. I mean, look at all that land around them that could be used for a subdivision.

You should help them sell off some of that land so they can build bigger huts!

Spicoli
05-30-2008, 11:43 AM
I knew that hut looked familiar

Twes
05-30-2008, 02:37 PM
Unprovoked aggression.

Isn't this where we get to see how the gunship rockets shoot where the pilot is looking.

rexnom
05-30-2008, 06:47 PM
I've read some on the North Sentinel group actually...well as much as can be read...their geographic location actually favors isolation for a long time...as long as someone doesn't go Keamy all over their island. I didn't know this many people remained isolated still..

Arcadian
05-30-2008, 07:08 PM
Do the people in Btown's basement count as an isolated group?

indygeezer
05-30-2008, 08:57 PM
Geezer, its obvious they need a real estate agent there. I mean, look at all that land around them that could be used for a subdivision.

You should help them sell off some of that land so they can build bigger huts!

I have a feeling they may object to Covenants and Restrictions.

Lesseeeee

1) No boats parked in the driveway for more than 24 hrs.
2) No bonfire dancing after 11:00 PM
3) Indoor plumbing is required in all housing constructed after 11/17/2007
4) No relieving yourself within the village limits between sunrise and sunset
5) No spear chucking after sunset until 1/2 before sunrise.
6) Dogs are food
7) All bows must be disarmed and locked in an approved child-proof tree trunk.
8) the village elders must approve everything.


hmmm I may have missed something...............

kester99
05-30-2008, 11:25 PM
These people may be 'uncontacted' like the Americas were 'undiscovered' prior to Columbus. I could see these folks knowing full well, from other tribes' info, that that thing in the sky was one of the eurodevils' conveyances.

ajbry
05-30-2008, 11:53 PM
I hope people leave them alone. I mean, why spoil what they have there.

Leave them be.

I completely agree. Part of me wishes that articles such as these - harmless and interesting as they may be - weren't even published. These people deserve to live their lives as nature intended and even a mere airplane presence might throw their entire culture into a tailspin (and no, not to the hilarious extent shown by The Gods Must Be Crazy).

cramerica
05-31-2008, 01:38 AM
once again FTA:
It is extraordinary to think that, in 2008, there remain about a hundred groups of people, scattered over the Earth, who know nothing of our world and we nothing of theirs, save a handful of brief encounters.
The uncontacted tribes, which are located in the jungles of South America, New Guinea and a remote and the beautiful and remote North Sentinel island in the Indian Ocean (the inhabitants of which have also responded to attempts at contact with extreme aggression) all have one thing in common - they want to be left alone.
And for good reason. The history of contact, between indigenous tribes and the outside world, has always been an unhappy one.

I love this kind of stuff. I think it's awesome that there are people out there that have no idea about the things we know and use everyday. They don't know about computers, message boards, Iraq, Bush, Clinton, Obama, bottled water, telephones, etc.

I, too, am in the crowd of just leaving them alone and let them be.

SycamoreKen
05-31-2008, 02:22 PM
On the news the government stated that they had to go take the pictures to prove the tribe was there. It seems oil and gas companies want to venture into the area in search of the magic go juice and were saying the tribes were not there. The government has no further plans to contact the tribes, just try to protect them and their land.

Pig Nash
05-31-2008, 04:46 PM
That's refreshing from a government. (that's all, i'll stop unPDing up this place.)

Natston
05-31-2008, 09:14 PM
I hope people leave them alone. I mean, why spoil what they have there.

Well, I'm already looking at open apartments in the area... :shrug:

Twes
06-01-2008, 09:19 AM
I'm just curious.

In the spirit of conversation, why do people say leave them alone?

What if they needed medical supplies or something. If they were all stricken with some ailment completely curable but deadly if untreated.

WHat if they aren't very nice and they behead all visitors and maybe each other. Do we still leave them alone.

And if we should leave them alone does that mean we should leave all other cultures alone? How do we decide who we leave alone and who we contact. It seems like these days we have something to say when an eskimo clubs a seal or a Norwegian harpoons a whale.

Interesting questions.

bellisimo
06-01-2008, 09:36 AM
so the IT guys managed to digitally enhance one of the photos...this is the end result....

.....

.....

....


http://i29.tinypic.com/2n80co9.jpg

Gyron
06-01-2008, 03:58 PM
I understand all of the questions you posted Twes, but at the same time, I kind of go with the "prime directive" like they have in StarTrek.

Let them find us first, then we;'ll help them. We shouldn't influence their society until they are ready for it.

But I do see your point.

bellisimo
06-01-2008, 05:20 PM
I'm just curious.

In the spirit of conversation, why do people say leave them alone?

What if they needed medical supplies or something. If they were all stricken with some ailment completely curable but deadly if untreated.

WHat if they aren't very nice and they behead all visitors and maybe each other. Do we still leave them alone.

And if we should leave them alone does that mean we should leave all other cultures alone? How do we decide who we leave alone and who we contact. It seems like these days we have something to say when an eskimo clubs a seal or a Norwegian harpoons a whale.

Interesting questions.


are these the same questions aliens asks themselves before coming out here to abduct some nut job from Denver?

Gyron
06-02-2008, 11:55 AM
Are you a member of the DEAC Belli?

bellisimo
06-02-2008, 12:44 PM
Are you a member of the DEAC Belli?

and what does DEAC stand for?

<TABLE class=AcrFinder cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0><TBODY><TR><TD class=acr>DEAC</TD><TD> - Data Exchange Auxiliary Console</TD></TR><TR><TD class=acr>DEAC</TD><TD> - Defense Economic Analysis Council</TD></TR><TR><TD class=acr>DEAC</TD><TD> - Diesel Engine Antifreeze Coolant</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>

? :confused: ? :-p

Gyron
06-02-2008, 12:59 PM
Denver Extraterrestrial Affairs Committee.....Of course I got it out an article you posted lol.

Lord Helmet
06-02-2008, 03:15 PM
I think this is amazing.

It's living history.

Twes
06-02-2008, 07:15 PM
Let me put it to you another way.

If one of those guys had 3 point range or was a monster in the low post and we felt like they could learn to love being a Pacer, we'd be loading up the tranquillizer darts and clearing a landing strip by dark tonight.

:cool:

MagicRat
06-24-2008, 08:56 AM
http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2008/jun/21/amazon

Secret of the 'lost' tribe that wasn't

Tribal guardian admits the Amazon Indians' existence was already known, but he hoped the publicity would lift the threat of logging


<!-- end article-header -->
Peter Beaumont (http://www.guardian.co.uk/profile/peterbeaumont), foreign affairs editor
The Observer (http://observer.guardian.co.uk/),
Sunday June 22, 2008
Article history http://image.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Guardian/Pix/pictures/2008/05/30/brtribe460x276.jpg Warriors from the Amazon basin tribe, above, paint their bodies red and fire arrows to ward off the plane carrying José Carlos Meirelles, who says that he released the picture in order to highlight the plight of indigenous people in the jungle

They are the amazing pictures that were beamed around the globe: a handful of warriors from an 'undiscovered tribe (http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2008/may/30/brazil.conservation)' in the rainforest on the Brazilian-Peruvian border brandishing bows and arrows at the aircraft that photographed them.

Or so the story was told and sold. But it has now emerged that, far from being unknown, the tribe's existence has been noted since 1910 and the mission to photograph them was undertaken in order to prove that 'uncontacted' tribes still existed in an area endangered by the menace of the logging industry.

The disclosures have been made by the man behind the pictures, José Carlos Meirelles, 61, one of the handful of sertanistas – experts on indigenous tribes – working for the Brazilian Indian Protection Agency, Funai, which is dedicated to searching out remote tribes and protecting them.

In his first interviews since the disclosure of the tribe's existence, Meirelles described how he found the group, detailed how they lived and how he planned the publicity to protect them and other tribes in similar danger of losing the habitat in which they have flourished for hundreds of years.
Meirelles admitted that the tribe was first known about almost a century ago and that the apparently chance encounter that produced the now famous images was no accident. 'When we think we might have found an isolated tribe,' he told al-Jazeera, 'a sertanista like me walks in the forest for two or three years to gather evidence and we mark it in our [global positioning system]. We then map the territory the Indians occupy and we draw that protected territory without making contact with them. And finally we set up a small outpost where we can monitor their protection.'

But in this case Meirelles appears, controversially, to have gone out to seek and find the uncontacted tribe in an area where it was known to be living.
According to his account, the Brazilian state of Acre offered him the use of an aircraft for three days. 'I had years of GPS co-ordinates,' he said.

Meirelles had another clue to the tribe's precise location. 'A friend of mine sent me some Google Earth co-ordinates and maps that showed a strange clearing in the middle of the forest and asked me what that was,' he said. 'I saw the co-ordinates and realised that it was close to the area I had been exploring with my son – so I needed to fly over it.'

For two days, Meirelles says, he flew a 150km-radius route over the border region with Peru and saw huts that belonged to isolated tribes. But he did not see people. 'When the women hear the plane above, they run into the forest, thinking it's a big bird,' he said. 'This is such a remote area, planes don't fly over it.'

What he was looking for was not only proof of life, but firm evidence that the tribes in this area were flourishing – proof in his view that the policy of no contact and protection was working. On the last day, with only a couple hours of flight time remaining, Meirelles spotted a large community.
'When I saw them painted red, I was satisfied, I was happy,' he said. 'Because painted red means they are ready for war, which to me says they are happy and healthy defending their territory.'

Survival International, the organisation that released the pictures along with Funai, conceded yesterday that Funai had known about this nomadic tribe for around two decades. It defended the disturbance of the tribe saying that, since the images had been released, it had forced neighbouring Peru to re-examine its logging policy in the border area where the tribe lives, as a result of the international media attention. Activist and former Funai president Sydney Possuelo agreed that – amid threats to their environment and doubt over the existence of such tribes – it was necessary to publish them.

But the revelation that the existence of the tribe was already established will provoke awkward questions over why a decision was made to try to photograph them – a form of contact in itself – in order to make a political point.

Meirelles, one of only five or so genuine sertanistas, has no regrets, arguing that the pictures and video released to the world were powerful and indisputable evidence to those who say isolated tribes no longer exist. 'Alan García [the President of Peru] declared recently that the isolated Indians were a creation in the imagination of environmentalists and anthropologists – now we have the pictures.'

But he is determined to keep the tribe's location secret – even under torture, he says. 'They can decide when they want contact, not me or anyone else.'

travmil
06-24-2008, 12:22 PM
That sucks that the tribe was already known. However, it sounds like his intentions were good. If what he says is true, and the logging companies and even the president of the country are trying to deny that the tribes even exist in order to go into their territory and basically destroy it, then it seems to have been a necessary step to take.

Gyron
06-24-2008, 12:24 PM
So the tribe was known, but its still uncontacted.

I don't see the big problem there. They should leave them alone....

Twes
06-25-2008, 04:34 PM
I think that one guy has a cell phone.

ABADays
06-25-2008, 06:02 PM
The way the rainforest is melting away? It's inevitable.

You speak the truth. Where I am in Iraq used to be a rain forest now it's just a dust bowl. :p