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View Full Version : Whedon fans gearing up to save new show that won't start for 8 months



Anthem
05-25-2008, 10:21 PM
That's awesome.

http://blog.wired.com/underwire/2008/05/dollhouse-fans.html


Die-hard Whedonites are rallying to save Dollhouse, the sci-fi drama about a group of high-tech killer assassins -- eight months before the show even hits the airwaves.

DollhouseForums' trailblazing leader Nathan posted the following as a call to arms: "After seeing some of my favorite television shows get canceled in the past -- as well as the 'save this show' campaigns that followed -- I had the idea that a fan campaign BEFORE the show begins may be the best thing to do."

Seriously, that's a level of mania bordering on frightening. Actually, it's way past "bordering."

kester99
05-25-2008, 10:27 PM
Why in the heck is he still dealing with Fox?

Hicks
05-26-2008, 09:45 AM
I wonder if it will matter.

Putnam
05-26-2008, 09:54 AM
"Shiny"

DisplacedKnick
05-26-2008, 12:01 PM
Why in the heck is he still dealing with Fox?

Dunno but he needs a pilot that knocks people out of their seats - and then for Fox to let the pilot play as a pilot.

One of the problems with Firefly IMO is that he took too long to start to unravel the plot twists. Even if the pilot had aired when it was supposed to, that was still a problem. Also, he had too many characters that he tried to introduce all at once - there should have been a way to add them piece by piece. By the 7th or 8th episode I was hooked but I never watched it until I bought the DVD. My guess is that if I'd watched it when it aired I might have gotten through 3-4 before giving up on it - even with the pilot.

He has to start off with a bang and add the texture and layers later.

Kat
05-28-2008, 05:48 PM
One of the problems with Firefly IMO is that he took too long to start to unravel the plot twists. Even if the pilot had aired when it was supposed to, that was still a problem. Also, he had too many characters that he tried to introduce all at once - there should have been a way to add them piece by piece. By the 7th or 8th episode I was hooked but I never watched it until I bought the DVD. My guess is that if I'd watched it when it aired I might have gotten through 3-4 before giving up on it - even with the pilot.

He has to start off with a bang and add the texture and layers later.

I dunno about all that. I think one of Whedon's strengths is his handling of the characters. Each one of his Firefly characters felt very distinct and memorable very quickly. I learned their names much quicker than with other shows. (I'm one of those people who's calling semi-major characters "that Asian dude" and "crazy chick" five episodes in.) Although adding characters in slowly would've worked, I think his way worked just as well. Perhaps better, because it brought in character dynamics and the family-type environment much quicker.

I'm also not sure what you mean by taking too long to unravel plot twists. Lost takes too long to reveal things. Here, Whedon answered a major question within 13 episodes + a movie. (Had it not been cancelled, I'm sure it would have unfolded by the end of the second season.) The other mysteries of the show (Book's past, Inara's secret) were long-term questions, yes, but he also didn't slap you in the face with those questions every episode. He was layering the story, foreshadowing later stories. He also didn't spend every episode focusing on these mysteries; his "filler" episodes were generally interesting in and of themselves.

I do think his earliest episodes were relatively weak. However, I think the length of time it took to pick up (about 6 or 7 episodes) was exceptionally short compared to many other shows. Look at the first seasons of shows like Star Trek: The Next Generation and Star Trek: Deep Space 9, for example. Barely memorable episodes, some awfully awkward acting, etc. Not every show starts out with a bang. Alternatively, I've seen shows start out with a wonderful pilot, but soon degenerate because all the creative juice was used up on said pilot. In general, I give shows a full season to impress me. I wish TV networks would do the same.

Keep in mind, also, had you watched it when it first aired, you would've seen gems like Our Mrs. Reynolds, Jaynestown, and Out of Gas much earlier (aired 3rd, 4th, and 5th, respectively). Generally, I don't appreciate networks mucking up the artist's vision, but it does look like they made good choices there.

I don't know what could've saved Firefly. At this point, it doesn't matter anyway. I do hope Dollhouse gets a fair shake, but it should be evaluated on its own merits, not coddled because Firefly didn't get treated right. I worry Eliza Dushku doesn't have the acting chops to pull off such a demanding role. It's ridiculous to try to save a show that you don't know is worth saving.

DisplacedKnick
05-28-2008, 06:24 PM
I dunno about all that. I think one of Whedon's strengths is his handling of the characters. Each one of his Firefly characters felt very distinct and memorable very quickly. I learned their names much quicker than with other shows. (I'm one of those people who's calling semi-major characters "that Asian dude" and "crazy chick" five episodes in.) Although adding characters in slowly would've worked, I think his way worked just as well. Perhaps better, because it brought in character dynamics and the family-type environment much quicker.


I didn't care a lick for anyone - except River - until The Mrs. Reynolds ep and I really didn't get to care about them until the show where they had the explosion.

Up to that point it was, "Oh - they robbed a train." or, "Yippee - the Alliance found them and instead of being evil they let them go."

There was nothing there until they put the characters in real conflict and started showing them in some real pain, not running around robbing a train or finding out Jayne was a hero by mistake. It dragged, it didn't go anywhere and none of the characters had been explored in any real depth.

count55
05-28-2008, 07:06 PM
I didn't care a lick for anyone - except River - until The Mrs. Reynolds ep and I really didn't get to care about them until the show where they had the explosion.

Up to that point it was, "Oh - they robbed a train." or, "Yippee - the Alliance found them and instead of being evil they let them go."

There was nothing there until they put the characters in real conflict and started showing them in some real pain, not running around robbing a train or finding out Jayne was a hero by mistake. It dragged, it didn't go anywhere and none of the characters had been explored in any real depth.

The problem isn't with Whedon, but with network demands. When it comes to shows, they would prefer a Law and Order-type episodic structure. The characters are familiar, but they aren't horribly interested in a story arc. Often, with new shows, a large part of the first season are devoted to "stand alone" eps, with the idea that having a serial type show would discourage viewers who joined later in the season.

Hell, on the DVD commentary, they talk about how they know "Train Job" didn't make much sense because the Pilot hadn't been seen.

In any case, I'm excited about more product from Joss Whedon. Last year, while traveling on business, I watched the entire Buffy and Angel series, in sequence. I've been watching Buffy DVD's lately, out of sequence (7th season, then third, now watching fourth). That, plus Firefly & Serenity, gets recycled by me a lot.

I'm hopeful, but not sanguine, that Dollhouse will catch. Outside of things like "The Wire" and "Rome" from HBO, I haven't found a lot of shows that draw me in the Joss' have. Shows that I like tend to get canceled quickly and replaced with another lame-*** reality show.

I was pleased to see that this was just people being overzealous, rather than there being question about it getting killed before it starts.