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View Full Version : Ack...what did I do????????



indygeezer
01-06-2008, 08:29 PM
This AM Jr and I were discussing a friend of his who is headed for the Navy in June. She is going to Navy school to study languages and on from there.

In the course of the coversation I mentioned the Naval Academy. Jr. opined that the only military career he'd be interested in would be JAG and I told him that he could go to Academy and still get his law degree. Now he is eager to learn more about this.

Uhhhhhhhhh...did I screw up? Did I tell him wrongly???

Jose Slaughter
01-06-2008, 08:55 PM
Not at all, be proud that the young man is on the right path.

I am dealing with much worse.

kester99
01-06-2008, 09:04 PM
I don't see any pre-law track at USNA.

http://www.usna.edu/departments.html

Doctors and lawyers get their degrees elsewhere, then sign on w/ the military inder special (and better paying) contracts, I believe.

indygeezer
01-07-2008, 07:54 AM
OK...well he emphasized that it was "under consideration" last night. He had to reassure his mother who is dead set against him going to any college more than a few short hours away.

Jose....not sure what you are dealing with, but my oldest (41) is in prison for another 2 years..........and I'm dreading him getting out. (I'm hoping your's is no worse than that)

Gyron
01-07-2008, 12:09 PM
If he were to go to the Naval academy, You should be very proud Geez. If he goes into the military, while I know its not every parents dream, you should also be very proud that he chose to serve his country.

You did not make a mistake. But its a decision he needs to make for himself for either one fo those routes because they both come with a serious commitment.

Raoul Duke
01-07-2008, 02:03 PM
If your son is really the caliber person who can get in to the US Naval Academy why would you not be encouraging that. Seriously I would take being a grad of the Naval Academy over a law degree anyway. You do realize there are other ways to make money than being a lawyer. There are too many lawyers anyway and a lot don't make that much.

I'm not trying to act like I know "Jr" or anything but no kid in high school knows exactly what he wants to be when he grows up. A lot changes in 4 years. I know tons of kids who were supposedly set on being a lawyer but they aren't know.

I'm thinking the USNA is a little more selective than your average law school so if he can do that you should be all for it.

Will Galen
01-08-2008, 01:25 PM
I'm thinking the USNA is a little more selective than your average law school so if he can do that you should be all for it.

Not everyone wants their child doing something dangerous.

Gyron
01-08-2008, 03:58 PM
Not everyone wants their child doing something dangerous.

This is a major step for a child as they cross over into adulthood. It really should be their choice, not the parents. The parents can have an influence, but the final choice should rest with the child on something this big in deciding their future.

indygeezer
01-08-2008, 09:47 PM
I never said I was against it. I enlisted in the Air Force but was stopped by my parents.

We typically encourage the kids to do whatever they want to do...but Mrs G doesn't want either of them going to shool so far away and a part of me agrees.

As for law school...that is an idea he has as a back-up plan. His first love is music and he wishes to study Composition and Conducting along with voice.
Then (he says) if he can't make it in music he would like to get into law and the JAG is of interest (personally I think this comes from watching too much tv). But he also has a female friend who is going into the Navy and will be studying languages (Intelligence???) He has shadowed a good friend of ours and found it extremely interesting how lawyers build a deposition etc. He read half way thru an 80 page brief and asked if he could come back to read the rest another day. Then he eventually was able to observe the trial for that brief.

No, it's pretty much up to him...but his first battle would be with mom. and no...it is not the fear thing...it's the distance thing.

Gyron
01-08-2008, 11:00 PM
Sorry Geez, that wasn't directed at you, more to Will's comment.

btowncolt
01-09-2008, 10:10 AM
As for law school...that is an idea he has as a back-up plan. His first love is music and he wishes to study Composition and Conducting along with voice.

I would strongly advise against someone going to law school simply because they think they have nothing better to do. Assuming you go to a good one, it's not the kind of place you'll last more than three months if you're not completely dedicated to it.

As you probably know, I go to a pretty good one in the Boston area, and the first year meat grinder has already churned up and spit out a disturbing number of my classmates who all had one thing in common - law school as a backup plan. Now they have another $30,000 in debt and nothing new to add to their resumes when they return home.

indygeezer
01-10-2008, 12:57 AM
I would strongly advise against someone going to law school simply because they think they have nothing better to do. Assuming you go to a good one, it's not the kind of place you'll last more than three months if you're not completely dedicated to it.

As you probably know, I go to a pretty good one in the Boston area, and the first year meat grinder has already churned up and spit out a disturbing number of my classmates who all had one thing in common - law school as a backup plan. Now they have another $30,000 in debt and nothing new to add to their resumes when they return home.

And yet Uni of Michigan told us that Music was the No.1 ...non-pre-law major admitted to the school of law. Actually as a HS Jr. I'm not certain he has a definate idea what he wants to study.

As for the "decision should be theirs"....I agree to a degree. I have a friend who's daughter just graduated with a non-teaching Phys Ed degree. It doesn't even qualify her to run a Camp. Now...somebody didn't give any sensible quidance there, but they DID pay for her degree. I'd certainly have something to say about that situation.

Los Angeles
01-10-2008, 04:33 AM
As someone who works in law at arguably the "highest level" - whatever the **** that means - I would encourage any and every student that is Geezer Jr's age to dream of actually accomplishing something in life in any career other than law.

Architects build buildings.

Doctors save lives.

Musicians entertain people.

Chefs feed people.

Lawyers? Well, I'm not sure what lawyers do other than make life hell for other people, each other and themselves. Yay, lawyers.





No offense, btown. :flirt:

btowncolt
01-10-2008, 08:03 AM
And yet Uni of Michigan told us that Music was the No.1 ...non-pre-law major admitted to the school of law. Actually as a HS Jr. I'm not certain he has a definate idea what he wants to study.


Your college concentration couldn't have less to do with whether or not you want to go to law school.....there's not a connection there you seem to be looking for. Pre-law is a boring major anway. and most pre-laws don't end up even considering law school.

indygeezer
01-10-2008, 08:37 AM
Your college concentration couldn't have less to do with whether or not you want to go to law school.....there's not a connection there you seem to be looking for. Pre-law is a boring major anway. and most pre-laws don't end up even considering law school.

That's good to know.

Jr. is a very talented vocalist and pianist. He says that no matter what he does he will always have a music ministry within our church (he currently directs the youth choir and regularly plays for Mass). He even has two piano students of his own. But he has always mentioned law and found the times he's shadowed our friend fascinating...even talking to the guy about how to take depositions and build your questions or whatever he was talking about.

I personally think the military academy's would be a great place to "grow-up" and learn more about life before deciding what to do with your life. Unfortunately, there are none within an easy drive of Indy.

Gyron
01-10-2008, 09:54 AM
Wait....He goes to Church and he thinks he might want to be a Lawyer?

I was reasonably sure that all Lawyers were Satan's Minions? At least thats surely what they seem like.....

rexnom
01-10-2008, 10:48 AM
I was pre-law and poli sci and I've been working at a law firm here in dc for a while. When I first started, I was pretty dead-set on becoming a lawyer. I love my job but I realized quickly that it wasn't for me. It's been a great experience because of the contacts I've made around DC and because it's helped me realize my passion of politics.

Honestly? I think it's a great way to go. Do the undergrad separate of law school (most law schools don't really worry about what classes you take anyway, as long as you do well - of course, law or logic classes don't hurt). Then you work as a paralegal or intern for a couple of years and you get your feet wet - see if you like it.

I agree with btown that law school is something serious that you shouldn't really decide on in high school. I had no idea what college was when I was in high school, much less law school.

Will Galen
01-12-2008, 07:09 PM
This is a major step for a child as they cross over into adulthood. It really should be their choice, not the parents. The parents can have an influence, but the final choice should rest with the child on something this big in deciding their future.

You missed my point. PF Chang said . . . The US Naval Academy is a little more selective than your average law school so if he can do that you should be all for it.

The issue I was addressing was not rather it was the child's choice, but rather everyone should be for their child attending the Naval Academy.

He was saying you should be for your child attending the Naval Academy. My reply was simply to point out that not everyone would be for their child doing that. The reason I gave, because it could cause them to later be in the line of fire. However, there's other reason's also.

It goes without saying that it's the child's choice, or will be when he/she is of age. Everyone knows that. For example, I joined the Marine's when I was 19 and I didn't consult my parents about it.