PDA

View Full Version : The Wire Season 5



JayRedd
01-03-2008, 10:12 PM
Just found out that they're doing the whole "Show the episodes a week early On Demand" thing again. Not sure how many people are onto it yet, but I just watched the first episode.

I won't throw out any spoilers yet...but WOW. Great first episode. McNulty is back off the wagon already and Herc dropped one of the best lines in the history of the show.

I couldn't be anymore excited.

Unclebuck
01-04-2008, 08:40 AM
Here is an excellent review of "The Wire"

http://usatoday.printthis.clickability.com/pt/cpt?action=cpt&title=%27The+Wire%27%3A+Final+season+grounded+in+g enius+-+USATODAY.com&expire=&urlID=25681528&fb=Y&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.usatoday.com%2Flife%2Ftelevis ion%2Freviews%2F2008-01-03-the-wire_N.htm&partnerID=1663


'The Wire': Final season grounded in genius

By Robert Bianco, USA TODAY

Will more people finally show up now that we're down to The Wire?
You'd like to think so. Entering its fifth and final season, David Simon's sprawling epic of urban decay is as good as this startlingly brilliant show has ever been — and it has always been among TV's best. Yet when it comes to ratings and Emmys, The Wire has also always been on the outside looking in.

In some ways, The Wire's failure to break through is puzzling. Its actors are uniformly superb, and its verisimilitude — its feel for the details and nuances of urban life — is unparalleled. As for the oft-heard complaint that it's "difficult," the show's plotlines are no more tangled than those on 24 and Lost and the characters are no less sympathetic than those on The Sopranos. Pay just a moderate amount of attention Sunday and you'll have no trouble following the show, even if you've never seen it before.

Yet there is one barrier to mass appeal The Wire shares with much of great art: It confronts us rather than comforts us. Simon and his staff of writers tackle some of our most intractable problems: the drug war; the economic struggles of the lower and working classes; the corruption and inefficiency of local government; the collapse of our inner-city schools. And these complex social problems are not simply background color for a crime-show mystery; they're front and center, with no easy solutions or weekly resolutions. The Wire is intense in a medium that depends upon the casual; dense in a culture that increasingly leans toward the superficial.

This year, the problem prism through which the stories are viewed is the failure of the news media to live up to their social responsibilities, represented by a fictionalized version of Simon's former employer, The (Baltimore) Sun. The setting allows Simon to ridicule the ineptitude that marks much of modern journalism while using the paper's journalists to address and summarize Baltimore's problems.

At the root of those problems this season is money: too little for the police, schools and investigative reporting; too much for drug dealers, politicians and make-work projects. Losing his major crime unit to budget cuts, Detective Jimmy McNulty (Dominic West) invents a plan to refocus resources on crime, one that links him to an ambitious young reporter looking for a story that can "go national."

With each passing year, The Wire's air of exhaustion and resignation has deepened. Yet the show is not without hope or heroes, joined this season by an old-school editor (Homicide's Clark Johnson). There's humanity in its victims and dark humor in the goal-oriented drive of its villains.

With or without a strike, this is a show to treasure. Don't let it leave without you.

LouisvilleLip
01-04-2008, 12:00 PM
Half the season has already been leaked online. Unfortunetly the episodes are not in order: 1,2,5,6,7.

I bet the missing episodes will be leaked in a few days though. Guess I won't have to wait a month to see the conclusion of the wire I will watch them all in one day :D

JayRedd
01-06-2008, 08:51 PM
Half the season has already been leaked online. Unfortunetly the episodes are not in order: 1,2,5,6,7.

I bet the missing episodes will be leaked in a few days though. Guess I won't have to wait a month to see the conclusion of the wire I will watch them all in one day :D

I'm gonna try to hold off on that.

I know that David Simon gave out the first seven to critics, but I'm not sure how the last three would get leaked other than by some HBO execs (I've heard it's only 10 episodes for Season 5, which obviously sucks). Although, I guess that's fairly likely. Anyway, there's no way I could watch the first seven and then wait two months for #8.

Have you watched them yet? And have you come across the final three?

Just watched the "The Wire: Odyssey". Pretty good. Basically a lovefest where they talk about how the past seasons, reminisce on their favorite characters and scenes, and joke around about never winning Emmys. It's always nice to watch these things (they've done like four of em now) just to see how really proud all the actors, writers and directors are of it. (Some spoilers from the first four seasons, although very little from Season 4)

Anyway, off to watch Episode 1 again.

LouisvilleLip
01-06-2008, 11:44 PM
I have only watched episode 1 and 2 cause I don't watch to skip ahead to 5 without watching 3 and 4.

Last season pretty much the whole season was leaked like 3 episodes into the season so it could happen again. If it does I will watch it as long as they are all there. I still will watch it on tv too though just cause the quality is so much better.

JayRedd
01-13-2008, 04:01 PM
Episode 2 was sweet.

I'll spoil block my comments in case yall haven't seen it yet.

Avon sighting! Great stuff. "Surprise." And it was fantastic the way he's throwing up the Westside W while Marlo's making his proposition to Sergei. There was also a great Clay Davis rant in Burrell's office about how he's "been carrying the water" and can't believe city cops is all up in his ***. And, although I don't like it, good to see McNulty up to some scandalous ****.

More to say, but I'll wait til after I see it again tonight.

Peck
01-15-2008, 04:46 AM
Ok, call me dumb but what the hell was McNulty doing with that body at the end?

I get the fact that he was "fixing" it so it looked like a Homicide, but I do not get the "on the knees" thing.

What was up with that? I was very very afraid for a few min. that McNulty might really have lost it and was, well.....:-o

Anyway as to the difficulty's this show has had over the years keeping fans I know that one reason many people don't like it is because there is no one central character.

McNulty was kind of the key figure in seasons 1 & 2 but hell he wasn't even in but a hand full of scenes last season.

Actually it is one of the reasons I love the show, but I know that it is one of the reasons other people don't like it.

tdubb03
01-15-2008, 11:17 AM
Ok, call me dumb but what the hell was McNulty doing with that body at the end?

So far we've seen how the budget cuts due to the education deficit are effecting the BPD. The ran down cars, no OT pay, abandoning (on the clock anyway) the Marlo case. A serial killer who sexually assaults his victims, maybe even after death, will garner attention. Attention = media = funding.

I really feel like this is the beginning of the end for McNutty. We've known he was a drunken womanizer since day one, but the one thing he didn't waver on was honest po-lice work. Now that's not even sacred to him.

JayRedd
01-15-2008, 11:43 AM
A serial killer who sexually assaults his victims, maybe even after death, will garner attention. Attention = media = funding.

I didn't think that was his intention. Not sure why he pulled him into that position (maybe so his face would hit the hard ground and bruise up?), but on the autopsy it would be pretty obvious to any medical examiner that the homeless dude wasn't sexually assaulted.


I really feel like this is the beginning of the end for McNutty.

Prolly true considering the fated, Greek tragedy element of the show...


We've known he was a drunken womanizer since day one, but the one thing he didn't waver on was honest po-lice work. Now that's not even sacred to him.

but I disagree here somewhat. McNulty's always been willing to cut corners. Bunny even said so when he Jummy told him that he inserted Stringer's name as the informant on the Avon warrant, even without knowing the source. That was crossing a line.

He also "cheated" in Season 1 at one point by writing in the log that someone was up on a rooftop monitoring a payphone when nobody was. I believe it was after Kima got shot up, but I know Prez was the only person in the office with him and questioned his ethics.

Those are the only two I can think of immediately, but I'm sure there's more and it illustrates that he's always been willing to bend the rules according to his own idea of reality.

Of course, he has always been presented as "good po-lice" but more than anything, it's always been about him proving "he's the smartest muthat*****er in the room." To me, that's what this is about. Him proving he can get his what he wants by any means necessary and coerce the police force and, in fact, all of City Hall to let him do what he wants, i.e., chase "his" case.

Or maybe I'm wrong...either way, it's great to see McNulty Being McNulty again and backdooring the system (no pun intended, Peck ;))

tdubb03
01-15-2008, 05:27 PM
I didn't think that was his intention. Not sure why he pulled him into that position (maybe so his face would hit the hard ground and bruise up?), but on the autopsy it would be pretty obvious to any medical examiner that the homeless dude wasn't sexually assaulted.

This is true, and an obvious and overlooked (on my part) point. It does seem more likely he put the guy in that position to make the bruises more prominent. It still remains that he manipulated the crime scene to garner attention and eventual funding for the BPD. I think so anyway, we'll see.


but I disagree here somewhat. McNulty's always been willing to cut corners. Bunny even said so when he Jummy told him that he inserted Stringer's name as the informant on the Avon warrant, even without knowing the source. That was crossing a line.

He also "cheated" in Season 1 at one point by writing in the log that someone was up on a rooftop monitoring a payphone when nobody was. I believe it was after Kima got shot up, but I know Prez was the only person in the office with him and questioned his ethics.

Those are the only two I can think of immediately, but I'm sure there's more and it illustrates that he's always been willing to bend the rules according to his own idea of reality.

Of course, he has always been presented as "good po-lice" but more than anything, it's always been about him proving "he's the smartest muthat*****er in the room." To me, that's what this is about. Him proving he can get his what he wants by any means necessary and coerce the police force and, in fact, all of City Hall to let him do what he wants, i.e., chase "his" case.

Or maybe I'm wrong...either way, it's great to see McNulty Being McNulty again and backdooring the system (no pun intended, Peck ;))

I understand the point you're making with him being prone to rule-bending, and that does cross a line. But I only see that as crossing a professional line, this recent scenario is crossing a much more moral and ethical line that we haven't seen from Jimmy before (that I remember).

JayRedd
01-15-2008, 11:29 PM
I understand the point you're making with him being prone to rule-bending, and that does cross a line. But I only see that as crossing a professional line, this recent scenario is crossing a much more moral and ethical line that we haven't seen from Jimmy before (that I remember).

Gotcha...Good point.

There is certainly a professional integrity vs. objective morality question at play between the things I mentioned and this latest episode.

Yet, when we talk about it that way, it's pretty hard to really define any sort of objective morality in this show. I guess we'll see more of it in the coming weeks. But I guess what it comes down to the infinite wisdom of The Bunk: "Every man must have a code." And I think you're probably right that McNulty has always lived by a code -- an admittedly skewed code, but a code nonetheless. Is choking a homeless man to make a natural death be classified as a murder part of this skewed code...or is it crossing that line entirely? From the outside, it would seem to cross obviously cross a line. But we gotta remember that this is The Wire and this is McNulty. So like I say...we'll see in the coming weeks.

Additionally, I've got an interesting take on the parallels between McNulty and Bodie that sort of relate to this...but I gotta get some sleep. More to come later.

Skaut_Ech
01-16-2008, 12:20 PM
I've JUST NOW started watching the Wire. Unbelievable show. I've been catching up, bit by bit, on past seasons before I watch this season. I'm going to have to track down boxed sets of the previous seasons.

You guys have NO idea how realistic the show is about portraying police politics and life on the street.

I used to work undercover buying crack, setting up stings and trying to figure out the hierarchy of power on the streets. I had to quit one day because I couldn't take it anymore. I was tired of locking up 15-16-17 year olds for long stays in the prison system because they felt they had no avenues for their lives.

The worst, and the incident that made me quit, was I drove a 16 year old crack dealer to his supplier, because he was out of product and I had garnered his trust a bit. On the drive over, he told me how his mom was working two jobs and was never home. He didn't know who his dad was and how crack was a great way to make some money. What struck me is that he wanted to discuss world politics. :-o He didn't grasp what was going on, but you could see he had some interest. What might that kid have accomplished in a different environment?

I couldn't, in good conscience, send any more kids like him to long stays in the prison/jail system seeing what they have to deal with and live with myself.

I used to tout Homicide: Life on the Streets as the best cop show I'd ever seen. Now it's been replaced. Figures that David Simon had a hand in both series.

Enjoy the show, folks. It's the best depiction of that kind of lifestyle, both cops and "bad guys" that you will ever see on TV.

I hate that I came to the party late, but at least I still came. GREAT show.

JayRedd
01-21-2008, 09:19 AM
I've JUST NOW started watching the Wire.

Congrats. Best decision of your life.

Meanwhile, just caught Episode 4. Wow. In the words of the great Bodie Broadus: S*** is on.

Dab
01-21-2008, 02:34 PM
Interesting article:

What do real thugs think of The Wire? (http://freakonomics.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/01/09/what-do-real-thugs-think-of-the-wire/)

JayRedd
01-22-2008, 06:02 PM
Great Wire blog.

http://heavenandhere.wordpress.com/

LouisvilleLip
01-22-2008, 08:09 PM
Since 3rd and 4th episode finally came out I was able to watch the leaked copies of 5,6,7 the past two days. Can't wait for the last 3!!!!

dannyboy
01-24-2008, 08:31 PM
I read the following excerpt today about the best ever scene (link (http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/page2/story?page=simmons/links/080123)).


Speaking of "The Wire," old friend Jason Whitlock and I were exchanging e-mails about the greatest scene in "Wire" history last weekend. I always thought it was the Stringer/Avon balcony scene in the third season when it became clear that (A) one of them was going to kill the other, and (B) each of them was thinking this, only they were pretending it wasn't the case. Just an amazing piece of writing and acting. Whitlock argues for the first Marlo/Avon jail scene (from this season's second episode) and made such a convincing case that I went back to the episode "On Demand" and watched it three straight times and he's right, that's an incredible scene. Now I'm torn. I want to see how Season 5 plays out before I make a final verdict.I thoroughly enjoyed both of those. But my favorite for some reason is one of the scenes featuring Bunk and Omar. I seem to like all the scenes with the two of them ("A man's gotta have a code", "No more bodies from you", etc.) It's the scene where Bunk talks about how the city used to be, saying something to the effect of "it's sad how far we've fallen", and "all that's left is bodies". I enjoyed both actor's performances in that scene, even though most of the lines came from one guy.

Honorable mention to the scene where D'Angelo thought Weebey was about to off him. The scene was filmed in a way to make the viewer think the same thing. When they showed D on the verge of tears, right up until the light came on to reveal the big fish tank, I was thinking 'damn, he's really gonna kill him'.

JayRedd
01-27-2008, 06:30 PM
Have yall seen these? Sudhir Venkatesh has been watching each Sunday with group of real-life, high-level hustlers.

Pretty interesting.

Episode 1
http://freakonomics.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/01/09/what-do-real-thugs-think-of-the-wire/

Episode 2
http://freakonomics.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/01/18/what-do-real-thugs-think-of-the-wire-part-two/

Episode 3
http://freakonomics.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/01/25/what-do-real-thugs-think-of-the-wire-part-three/

Kegboy
01-27-2008, 07:42 PM
I'd read the first one, didn't realize it was going to be a continuing series.

Just watched episode 3 today. I agree with the thugs, what they did to Butchie was ****ed up.

Kstat
01-27-2008, 07:51 PM
I don't agree with that **** at all. You don't torture a blind man, that's just sick.

JayRedd
01-27-2008, 09:17 PM
that's just sick.

That's just Marlo.

"You think it should be one way...But it's that other way."

Kstat
01-28-2008, 01:15 AM
That's just Marlo.

"You think it should be one way...But it's that other way."

Actually, that's Chris and Snoop. Marlo hasn't killed a single person in the entire series.

Anybody else find it really odd that Snoop actually WAS the real thing? I can't imagine her with her own crew in real life...

JayRedd
01-28-2008, 10:49 AM
Actually, that's Chris and Snoop. Marlo hasn't killed a single person in the entire series.

True...But he's he puppet master and seemed to really enjoy watching the fat man get got. Chris is just carrying out instructions isn't he? And he actually ended it fairly quick I thought...showed a little compassion in an incredibly twisted and warped way. They coulda gotten all medieval and/or CIA on his *** like the Barksdale crew did to Omar's boyfriend in Season 1. Cigarette burns, popped out eyes, the whole nine.

And Marlo did kill that girl pretty coldblooded in Season 3. Devonne I think was her name...that girl he got with in his truck anyway. One in each tit and one to the dome. And there was talk about "two to the chest...one to the head" being his "calling card" back in a case Crutchfield (I think) had caught back when Marlo's street name was "Black" and the state witness had shown up dead. I think it's safe to say he earned his stripes...he's just above that part of the game now.

But yeah...Chris and Snoop are certainly his equals when it comes to psychopaths.

JayRedd
01-28-2008, 11:26 PM
Just watched episode 55. I have to do some thinking.

Peck
02-01-2008, 02:56 AM
Just watched episode 55. I have to do some thinking.

Well.....

Don't leave me hanging.:confused:

JayRedd
02-01-2008, 04:18 PM
Well.....

Don't leave me hanging.:confused:

This is all about 55...if you haven't seen it, don't click here.


I dunno...I really don't.

That ending is still bothering me. On the one hand, I'm glad Omar got out alive. But a Superman plunge off the balcony? Really? Just seemed too sensational for this show. Rather out of place. And the "cliffhanger" type ending was pretty unusual too.

I dunno...I'm reserving all judgement until i see Episode 56. Simon's earned that.

Kstat
02-03-2008, 06:43 AM
This is all about 55...if you haven't seen it, don't click here.


I dunno...I really don't.

That ending is still bothering me. On the one hand, I'm glad Omar got out alive. But a Superman plunge off the balcony? Really? Just seemed too sensational for this show. Rather out of place. And the "cliffhanger" type ending was pretty unusual too.

I dunno...I'm reserving all judgement until i see Episode 56. Simon's earned that.


Dude, Omar is superman. Only someone truly blessed can go through what he's gone through and live to tell about it.

He's the baddest man in Baltimore, their version of NY's Brother Muzone. A one-man army. So yeah, him surviving a situation like that would not surprise me at all.

BTW, as the series goes on, you see that Omar hardly got through it uninjured. It only makes it funnier to see him do his wrecking ball thing with a handicap....

Kegboy
02-03-2008, 05:11 PM
Just watched episode 4. I figured if anyone would come out unscathed, it'd be Prop Joe. IMO, his mistake was leaving Marlo and Cheese to Omar instead of taking care of it himself. I understand him not wanting to put Cheese down, but if he was smart enough to put it together from that wad Cheese pulled out, he shouldn't have left him to his own devices.

Still, it was cool he got that scene with Herc before the end.

Kegboy
02-10-2008, 09:50 PM
http://www.bustedtees.com/bt/images/BT-carcettiformayor-gallery-4895.jpg

http://www.bustedtees.com/shirt/carcettiformayor/male

And yes, I'm still a week behind.

[edit] Speaking of which, I was shocked to see Chris is a family man. I'd already seen he had more of a moral center than Snoop and Marlo, but I was still blown away by that.

Kstat
02-11-2008, 02:09 AM
moral character? The guy shot the delivery lady in the heart after helping her with her deliveries.

Not to mention the beating he gave Michael's brother's father, which went slightly beyond simple murder...

Kegboy
02-11-2008, 04:37 PM
moral character? The guy shot the delivery lady in the heart after helping her with her deliveries.

Not to mention the beating he gave Michael's brother's father, which went slightly beyond simple murder...

Come on, I'm talking in degrees. He showed distaste in torturing Butchie and he's treated Michael well. And I've already argued that the deal with Michael's step-father actually humanized him. Yes, he's a horrible *******, but we've seen there's more to him than Marlo and Snoop.

JayRedd
02-11-2008, 05:15 PM
Come on, I'm talking in degrees. He showed distaste in torturing Butchie and he's treated Michael well. And I've already argued that the deal with Michael's step-father actually humanized him. Yes, he's a horrible *******, but we've seen there's more to him than Marlo and Snoop.

Yeah....I agree.

Snoop is just a messed up sociopath. She seems to legitimately enjoy killing.

And for Marlo, it's a cruel, ruthless means to an end. He's just indifferent to murder as simply as if it was littering.

For Chris though, dropping all the bodies seems like more of a job that he does somewhat begrudgingly, but he does it because he's good at it and it's all he knows. He's sort of like a more ruthless, efficient WeyBey, IMO, and even Sergei to a lesser degree: Just a soldier. They all figured out early that this was something they could do better than most and it became their "part of the game" that they could use to get out of whatever it was they were trying to get out of. I don't think Chris enjoys killing any more than most people in a war would. And I think similarly, it bothers him a little. But he's just following orders. Yes, they're orders in a *****ed up world, but he's just doing what he thinks he has to do.

Aside from Bugg's dad. That ***** was primal vigilante justice. He took some animalistic pleasure in that one.

Skaut_Ech
02-15-2008, 11:40 AM
Aside from Bugg's dad. That ***** was primal vigilante justice. He took some animalistic pleasure in that one.

I had a little different take on it. I felt like that was maybe some vengence. His own. I'm wondering if maybe the thing that put Chris on his path was his OWN father abusing him and we were seeing a little transference on his part.

JayRedd
02-20-2008, 12:42 AM
Yeah, Skaut, I'm with you on the personal vengence notion. I meant that...just didn't write it properly. David Simon even said that Chris was abused as a kid in the director commentary on that episode DVD (supposedly...I didn't actually watch it, just heard that he said that around the intertubes.) Seemed pretty obvious anyway.

Meanwhile...Anyone seen Episode 8? If not, do so immediately.

Kstat
02-20-2008, 03:35 PM
I do, and I have a little conspiracy theory behind it...

See the DOB on the tag next to him at the end? there's no way Omar is 48 years old. The flashback showed that he was just a little boy in 1985.

Also notice that Omar didn't have a limp when he walked into the convenience store, and his gun looked different?

Either there are some major plotholes, or that was Omar's older brother that go shot up.

JayRedd
02-21-2008, 10:24 PM
I do, and I have a little conspiracy theory behind it...

See the DOB on the tag next to him at the end? there's no way Omar is 48 years old. The flashback showed that he was just a little boy in 1985.

Also notice that Omar didn't have a limp when he walked into the convenience store, and his gun looked different?

Either there are some major plotholes, or that was Omar's older brother that go shot up.

Interesting thought. Doubtful, but interesting.

The way I saw it was as a clerical error on the ID cards (info transposed or something) that was meant to shed some light on Omar's existence -- and by proxy, every one in BMore (though especially those in the game.)

I saw the clerical mistake as trying to show the relative insignificance of Omar to the actual real world. To us viewers, Omar was a borderline superhero and he was a legend of the Westside. But to the medical examiner he was a name and a DOB...and they couldn't even get right. Similarly, his murder -- the murder of the baddest *** gunslinger in BMore -- didn't even make the paper. Gus didn't even see it as an important enough story to run as a brief. He told Alma to write up some fire instead: "Ran outta room." So to the paper (the keeper of public record in our society and the decider of what's important to our society) one of the most hugely significant events in this series didn't even warrant mentioning in the real world.

And I think that's a metaphor/the theme of this season: Part of the reason post-industrial American cities are so messed up is that people aren't informed about the critical problems. And its the newspapers (and other news media) that are struggling -- or outright failing -- to inform them.

In another way, too, I think whole thing was done brilliantly.

They showed Omar in the bag right after Beadie gets done with her big speech about how, after you die, all you have is family and -- if you're lucky -- a few friends at your wake. And that's what counts. That's who remembers you. Everyone else just hears "You hear Jimmy died?" and is like "Who?" and then they learn it's "Jimmy the cop" and they are like "Oh...yeah...him."

Omar has nobody. He lived alone died alone. Sure, Renaldo will presumably be upset, but he'll move on.

So even though Omar was maybe the baddest man in BMore, he'll just be remembered as a myth -- "Omar the gay stick-up boy." But he's got no family...no one to really care to remember Omar the man. And no one to go to his wake, which won't even ever happen cause no one will ever even claim the body.

That's how I saw it anyway.

Peck
02-26-2008, 06:33 AM
Interesting thought. Doubtful, but interesting.

The way I saw it was as a clerical error on the ID cards (info transposed or something) that was meant to shed some light on Omar's existence -- and by proxy, every one in BMore (though especially those in the game.)

I saw the clerical mistake as trying to show the relative insignificance of Omar to the actual real world. To us viewers, Omar was a borderline superhero and he was a legend of the Westside. But to the medical examiner he was a name and a DOB...and they couldn't even get right. Similarly, his murder -- the murder of the baddest *** gunslinger in BMore -- didn't even make the paper. Gus didn't even see it as an important enough story to run as a brief. He told Alma to write up some fire instead: "Ran outta room." So to the paper (the keeper of public record in our society and the decider of what's important to our society) one of the most hugely significant events in this series didn't even warrant mentioning in the real world.

And I think that's a metaphor/the theme of this season: Part of the reason post-industrial American cities are so messed up is that people aren't informed about the critical problems. And its the newspapers (and other news media) that are struggling -- or outright failing -- to inform them.

In another way, too, I think whole thing was done brilliantly.

They showed Omar in the bag right after Beadie gets done with her big speech about how, after you die, all you have is family and -- if you're lucky -- a few friends at your wake. And that's what counts. That's who remembers you. Everyone else just hears "You hear Jimmy died?" and is like "Who?" and then they learn it's "Jimmy the cop" and they are like "Oh...yeah...him."

Omar has nobody. He lived alone died alone. Sure, Renaldo will presumably be upset, but he'll move on.

So even though Omar was maybe the baddest man in BMore, he'll just be remembered as a myth -- "Omar the gay stick-up boy." But he's got no family...no one to really care to remember Omar the man. And no one to go to his wake, which won't even ever happen cause no one will ever even claim the body.

That's how I saw it anyway.

Brilliant take on that. Just goes to show how deep this show really truely is.

Skaut_Ech
03-03-2008, 01:42 PM
I am DYING here. The Wire has played like a greek tragedy and I think we're about to see the motherload of punishment from the Gods.

I strongly suspect when the dust settles, Marlo is going to be as strong as ever and yet another police department is going to sink under the weight of corruption charges.

I'm afraid to watch the final episode casue I don't think ANYONE is going to have a happy ending.

Except Bunk. :laugh::shakehead

JayRedd
03-03-2008, 05:14 PM
My guess is: Marlo wins. McNulty losses. Bubs and Namond are the only other ones coming out roses. Straight to Hades for everyone else.

Also, another purely speculative prediction that probably has no chance of happening but would be mildly clever and also kinda dumb: The Cheese stands alone.

Isaac
03-03-2008, 10:52 PM
I have a bad feeling about the journalist (blonde one that wrote the homeless story, can't remember his name). His story is setting up for something very tragic to happen.

Peck
03-04-2008, 04:43 AM
I am DYING here. The Wire has played like a greek tragedy and I think we're about to see the motherload of punishment from the Gods.

I strongly suspect when the dust settles, Marlo is going to be as strong as ever and yet another police department is going to sink under the weight of corruption charges.

I'm afraid to watch the final episode casue I don't think ANYONE is going to have a happy ending.

Except Bunk. :laugh::shakehead

I go back and forth on Marlo. On the one hand I've thought all season long that McNulty's folly would end up letting Marlo walk.

On the other hand for some reason I keep thinking that Barksdale or one of his crew will step up and take out Marlo.

But either way I can't see this playing out well for Baltimore P.D. or Carcetti for that matter.

Kstat
03-08-2008, 01:57 PM
Just watched the finale. Beautiful. Very fitting ending to the series.

JayRedd
03-08-2008, 02:00 PM
Just watched the finale. Beautiful. Very fitting ending to the series.

Watched it last night.

And yup.

Everything that needed to happen happened.

LouisvilleLip
03-08-2008, 05:33 PM
Where?

JayRedd
03-08-2008, 05:51 PM
It's on the torrent sites already. Quality isn't amazing, (says "property of HBO" at the bottom the whole time) but it's fine to watch.

Mininova has it.

LouisvilleLip
03-09-2008, 04:17 PM
Hmm I just watched it guess i will wait to voice my opinion after they show it tonight.

Peck
03-10-2008, 01:33 AM
The question is, how do you truely wrap up a show as deep and complex as the wire?

I think they did a very good job of trying to tie up most of the loose ends and the whole life goes on angle was really about all you can expect.

I won't spoil it for anyone who hasn't seen the finale yet but unlike other shows that have left you hanging or tried to tie a pretty bow around everything I think David Simon and his crew did well by the audience.

Speaking only for myself I came away satisfied.

Kstat
03-10-2008, 02:42 AM
The nostalgia factor was through the roof...

JayRedd
03-10-2008, 10:13 AM
Simon speaks.

Here, he answers a lot of questions that are left at the end of this all (though amazingly there really aren't many) and he does a great job of telling us his take on the single biggest hanging thread, Marlo's future. I also hope his explanation of the paper story will help people stop being so upset about it too. It really was important. A little sensational (for The Wire anyway, though I think that might have been part of the point) and not as entertaining as any other major plot line (aside from Gus of course), but it needed to be done and the way they executed it, while maybe not ideal, did fully accomplish his goal ideologically.


This interview is amazing. Best I've ever seen from him:

http://sepinwall.blogspot.com/2008/03/wire-david-simon-q.html


And here's the detailed post on the last episode done by the guy who asked the questions:

http://sepinwall.blogspot.com/2008/03/wire-30-farewell-to-baltimore.html

Skaut_Ech
03-10-2008, 01:43 PM
Those are GREAT links, Jay. I'm glad he mentioned the cyclical nature of things he was trying to point out. There was so much to comment on that I cant and don't know where to start.

And I've only watched one season!

I will say this. The way they left Marlo was better than ANY jail sentence or murder of his character. I mean, think about it. He had his name SMEARED all over the streets, to the point that that he looked like a scared *****. Then before he can restore his "good" name, he gets locked up. Now he can't do anything about restoring his name. Can't start his business back up. Cant operate in the real business world, due to his discomfort. He's in limbo. NO friends, no job and no rep. Just money. And how funny was it that the last corner kids were telling Omar legends as Marlo walked up? The legit world, like the coroner's office, may not know who Omar was, but he is a legend in the streets, where it would count most to him.

MAN, that was a GREAT ending. I plan to eventually watch all the previous seasons. Everything seemed to just...fit right for the series finale.

As a side note, did anyone really identify with any of the characters? I know I did, but I'll table the discussion if no one else did.

JayRedd
03-10-2008, 08:43 PM
Bodie is by far my favorite character.

To me, he's the most emblematic of a whole group of characters (Kima, Bunk, Slim, Bey, Gus, Carver, Cutty, etc.) who represent the honorable, hard-working people who have no vast ambition aside from being good at what they do and will not compromise their dignity just to advance through the institutions everyone else in the whole series is so beholden to. They aren't like Omar, Jimmy and Bunny who exist on the fringe of their institutions; they are fully ingrained and have in a way, bought into it. But even so, they still have a code of principles that are, even if objectively warped, sanctified. And while they do want to advance and be respected by their peers as great at what they do, they don't have the same insatiable desire such as the Carcettis, Marlos, Clays, Avons, Rawleses and Templetons of the world. Ultimately, they just want to do good work.

So I think all these types are easy to identify with for those of us just living the daily grind and hoping to gain respect for what we do, but are not trying to take any shorts and wouldn't think getting where we want to go would even be worth it if it meant we had to **** over a bunch of people on the way.

Not surprisingly (and I think by design) a lot of this group are my favorites, though not all of course.

After Bodie, I'd have to rank them: Bunk, WeeBey, Jimmy, Freamon, Avon, Omar, Michael, Marlo, Kima, Gus, Clay, Donut, and Sergei. I suppose it's a pretty good show when I can't even limit that response to a top ten.

And that's one heck of an understanding of what's going on here, Skaut, for someone who's only seen ten episodes -- four or five of which were probably among the worst ten in the entire series. If you recognized that Marlo's final fate was his ultimate punishment without even seeing seasons three and four, then, boy, you gonna love you some Season 1.

Peck
03-10-2008, 09:50 PM
Scott,

Honest to God while the series finale was superb I will say this, this season was one of the weakest of the 5. Now don't get me wrong, the weakest of the wire is still better than almost any other show at it's best (not DS9 of course :D) but if you liked this season then you will love the rest.

Skaut_Ech
03-11-2008, 03:41 AM
No kidding guys? Wow. Now, I'm scared to watch them. Rather than dole them out to myself in chunks, sounds like I'll want to have a marathon watching session.

Especially to see how Marlo got started.

Peck
03-11-2008, 03:52 AM
No kidding guys? Wow. Now, I'm scared to watch them. Rather than dole them out to myself in chunks, sounds like I'll want to have a marathon watching session.

Especially to see how Marlo got started.

Believe it or not, Marlow is a userper of the throne. Wait till you hear the name Barksdale or better yet, Stringer Bell.

The Barksdale storyline with all of the hoppers will draw you deep deep deep into the show.

The funny thing is if you have only seen this season you only know Bubbles as a recovering addict who lives in his sisters basement. Wait till you see him in seasons 1 & 2.

Truely it's hard for me to pick a favorite season. 1, 2 or 4 all are exceptional. I guess I kind of like the dock workers storyline.

Ok while I'm at it can I ask the group a question.

There was only one part of the entire show that to me they just dropped out there as a bombshell and then did nothing with it at all. I don't remember what season it was in either but does anybody else remember them showing Rawls at a gay bar?

What was the point of that? Was that supposed to be a "oh and btw he's gay but who cares" moments. Or was it a storyline that for whatever reason they decided to abandon?

For some reason I always expected them to use that as blackmail against him.

JayRedd
03-11-2008, 11:57 AM
This is from that long-*** interview I posted yesterday.



Q. There's clearly, at least based on the last names and the bios on the HBO website, a connection between Randy and Cheese (NOTE: the bios essentially state that Cheese (http://www.hbo.com/thewire/cast/characters/cheese.shtml) is Randy’s (http://www.hbo.com/thewire/cast/characters/randy_wagstaff.shtml) dad, a fact Simon would publicly confirm a few days after we spoke), and that's something you never really got into on the show.

Simon: Actually, that is something that we were going to play a little bit of that and reference that in season five if we had had a little bit more room. But ultimately it would have been incremental. It would not have added to the overall theme or to either of those characterizations of Cheese or Randy. It would not have resolved in any unique way that would have revealed anything more about the character than we otherwise revealed. It would have just been more story and more scenes. So at a certain point, on a practical basis, you have to ask what you're accomplishing if you go further.

Did we lay other groundwork? We did. We could have cannibalized Rawls' moment in the gay bar and advanced that moment, but I'm not sure we would have created any more theme, and on some level it was very satisfying just to grant the notion of a closeted gay man's sexuality a moment on screen and then move on. There was something very compelling and real about just acknowledging that but not making it into grist for a storyline that didn't add anything to our portrayal of Rawls. We were always laying pipe that could be picked up later. It doesn't mean that you should pick it up.


http://sepinwall.blogspot.com/2008/03/wire-david-simon-q.html

Unclebuck
03-18-2008, 03:28 PM
Here is a good blog by Tyson Chandler

http://my.nba.com/thread.jspa?threadID=5700000721

THE WIRE
I'm disappointed in the finale. This definitely can't be the last Wire. It definitely has to go on, because there were too many things that were left untied for me. Like Marlo going back on the street, like Carcetti. And they never showed what happened with Randy.

It never seemed like a real ending to me. It seemed like there was another season. Maybe because I love The Wire so much, I just want more. I love the story if that was three episodes from the end. You know what I mean? I didn't like the end.

And then my little poor man, Dukie. That just crushed me when I saw him doing heroin.

I had a friend whose mother was a junkie. His grandmother gave him a Sega one year, and when he came home, all of his stuff was gone, because his mom had got to it and sold it. Basically, he knew that he would have to hide his things.

We all played Sega around the neighborhood, and we all had different games. We would each get like one game for Christmas, so we would just rotate. But if we were walking down the street with his Sega, a video game or something like that, my mom would have to stand outside of the house and we would have to run from my house to his house, so we didn't run across any junkies and get jacked. The Sega was too big to put in a bag or something. There were a lot of junkies where I lived and if they saw something, they would snatch it from you and go sell it.

To see Bubbles fight through it and start his life back with his family was definitely a positive, so I was happy with that. But a lot of the stuff was just left untied. And pretty much, the locker room though the same thing. When I came to practice, Chris was like, "Man, there's gotta be more! That can't be it."

I just don't understand how it came to such a halt, like all of a sudden it was the last season. We should complain to HBO, definitely.

Right now, I'm like Scottie Pippen when he pointed at the MJ shoe, like "Come back."

The Wire shined a lot of light on what's going on. All of this stuff really happens. Like the politics, the police not having any money to do their jobs, the newspaper printing the wrong stuff, the drug trade. It's amazing to me because it so reminds me of how I grew up.

We all identify with it, because a lot of athletes came from single-parent homes and from the inner cities. So, we've all kinda been through the same situations. And so when you look at it, it's just crazy. Because I still get calls from my homeboys who get harassed by cops and got beatdowns just because of where they live at.

My mom and my family made sure to always talk to me, because they understood what was going on around me and they understood the neighborhood we lived in. So they made sure to always talk to me all the time about drugs, about people who were dealing, people who were running around and shooting people.

There were times where I was approached by people in the game, but my buddy's cousin basically ran the 'hood. If something was about to go down, they would tell us to go home. If there was gonna be a shootout, they made sure we were as far away as possible.

avoidingtheclowns
04-10-2008, 11:10 AM
A Harvard-hosted forum was held last week about the Wire. Panelists included creator/executive producer David Simon among others. Fascinating stuff actually. I don't think many Wire fans were aware.

http://www.iop.harvard.edu/Multimedia-Center/All-Videos/The-HBO-Series-The-Wire-A-Compelling-Portrayal-of-an-American-City

N8R
04-12-2008, 12:12 AM
I miss this show already. I agree with Tyson that there needs to be more

carpediem024
04-16-2008, 05:45 PM
Never seen the show... :(

N8R
04-17-2008, 01:58 AM
You sir need to get on the downloading train and start from season one. You will thank us later.

Unclebuck
04-17-2008, 09:21 AM
After the NBA playoffs are over, I'll watch season 4.

JayRedd
04-17-2008, 09:56 AM
After the NBA playoffs are over, I'll watch season 4.

I'm not even sure I could handle two things as great as the upcoming Western Conference Playoffs followed back-to-back with Season 4 of The Wire.

You, sir, are about to have one great start to the summer.

Kegboy
04-17-2008, 07:11 PM
After the NBA playoffs are over, I'll watch season 4.

Did you ever finish watching Lost? I remember you watching the first couple episodes, then never heard anything.

Unclebuck
04-18-2008, 11:27 AM
Did you ever finish watching Lost? I remember you watching the first couple episodes, then never heard anything.

I have the last 3 episodes of season three to watch tonight.

Dab
06-02-2008, 12:28 AM
I just got around to finishing up season 5 a couple of weeks ago. What can I say that hasn't already been said? There is one scene in season 5 that stands out to me. I think about it often; sometimes, it kills me.

(Spoilized for the benefit of those who haven't seen season 5, even though it's not really a critical scene.)

I forget which episode, but it was the one when Omar finds out about Butchie. They show Omar and Renaldo walking back to their beach villa, and just as in west Baltimore the cry goes up among the local children that "It's Omar! It's Omar!" But instead of fleeing from his path as they do in Baltimore, they flock to Omar as he is giving out candy(?) Such a contrast, and for a brief moment Omar seems truly happy.

Unclebuck
08-04-2008, 08:52 AM
Just watched the 1st two episodes of season 4. Another great season, and the kids are so good, so real it is going to be heartbreaking to what them fall - can't wait for school to start.

Not sure what it is, or how they do it, but the show just gets under your skin and the characters come alive

Seeing the one kids drug addicted parent, was just heart-breaking - just sad.

When does Omar appear - soon I hope. Good to see Bubbles though

Was just looking through the episode list and noticed something facinating. In each season I have watched so far (1-3) - I've though that the second to last episode has been the best - and I noticed that the same writer wrote each of those episodes. George Pelecanos

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_The_Wire_episodes