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NorCal_Pacerfan
01-02-2008, 10:44 PM
I'm watching the Blazers/Wolves game and at half-time the announcers were singing high praises for good ol' JJ #33. He's been lighting things up behind the arc. Basically saying he was a huge part of why they won 13 in a row. Apparently he wasn't playing much prior to the streak and as soon as he got involved their fortune changed. He's 3 for 3 tonight. This year he's shooting 55% behind the arc and averaging about 10pts per game. I like JJ and I'm glad to see him doing well up in Portland. ...also, Portland is a fun team to watch.

Naptown_Seth
01-02-2008, 11:02 PM
I HATED, as in ranted all the time, when they let him go. He was a Reggie clone. He hit some big shots in the brawl season to help push for the playoffs (that NJ game late when Reggie ripped off 5-6 late too) and showed a pure 3pt shot.

Sure he wasn't a great defender or strong off the dribble, but if you needed spot up or curl catch and shoots from 3, he was your man.

How bad do they need him right now. If Dun can play the 2 then certainly the quicker JJ could.

I know he was sometimes lost and green out there, but right now we are putting up with Danny, Ike, Shawne, Owens, etc making the same mistakes with far less overall impact on the positive side.


BTW, coming into last season JJ was 49th ALL TIME in NBA 3P%. Obviously his 38.5 rate went up with this season.

Anthem
01-02-2008, 11:47 PM
I said at the time we kept the wrong Jones. I liked his demeanor, his defense, and his solid-if-not-spectacular play.

I know he didn't set the world on fire in Pheonix, but I've always liked JJ.

Naptown_Seth
01-02-2008, 11:53 PM
Yeah, people slammed his total game, but that's not why you keep him. You keep him because he's got a true shot and proved he could make them off of cuts ala Reggie by running the exact same plays that Reggie ran (when 31 came out of games).

Great jump shooting coming off of cuts or off the dribble is a rare item and critical IMO. Look at Rip's game and his value.

Of course the 2nd round pick involved helped get James White I believe, so we've got that going for us.
(disclaimer, I liked White as a pick till I saw his lackluster pre-season camp)

Kofi
01-03-2008, 12:03 AM
James is playing well for Portland and is an exceptionally nice guy but he's not worth losing sleep over.

Young
01-03-2008, 12:05 AM
James is playing well for Portland and is an exceptionally nice guy but he's not worth losing sleep over.

I kind of agree with this.

I was wanting to keep Jones but not at the money he got. He is a replaceable player.

laft
01-03-2008, 12:33 AM
10-4 to those who thought this guy deserved some more time in a Pacers uniform. I don't know if I could say this if it weren't for the Orlando game a few years ago the night after that awful game in Detroit. After attending that game I payed close attention to JJ, something about the way he stepped up the night after the Brawl won me over. Oh well, at least Portland is a respectable team to root for with a good group of players. Nothing but the best for JJ.

Unclebuck
01-03-2008, 10:06 AM
I haven't missed JJ at all since he left here. He's a nice guy and a decent player, but that is all. I wish him well

JayRedd
01-03-2008, 11:35 AM
I'm thinking it would be nice to have one great shooter on a team that bases its offense on the jumpshot. But hey, that's just me.

Unclebuck
01-03-2008, 12:45 PM
I'm thinking it would be nice to have one great shooter on a team that bases its offense on the jumpshot. But hey, that's just me.

I guess I just don't think James Jones is a great shooter. yes he's shooting well to this point this season, but if you look at his entire career (and in Phoenix he got wide open shots all the time) his % doesn't indicate to me that he is a great shooter. He's a pretty good shooter, but I don't think anything more.

Here are his career stats.

FG% - 40.6
3-pt - 40%
FT% - 87%


What the Pacers offense needs more than shooters is someone who can create shots for himself, for his teammates and get to the free throw line - and JJ does none of those three things.

Hicks
01-03-2008, 01:32 PM
A career 40% 3pt shooter is at least very good if not great IMO.

Roy Munson
01-03-2008, 01:38 PM
I guess I just don't think James Jones is a great shooter. yes he's shooting well to this point this season, but if you look at his entire career (and in Phoenix he got wild open shots all the time) his % doesn't indicate to me that he is a great shooter. He's a pretty good shooter, but I don't think anything more.

Here are his career stats.

FG% - 40.6
3-pt - 40%
FT% - 87%


What the pacers offense needs more than shooters is someone who can create shots for himself, for his teammates and get to the free throw line - and JJ does none of those three things.

What you don't appear to understand, *removed*, is that 3-point shooters spread the defense and create opportunities for other players. JJones is helping Portland a great deal because he's making it easier for Aldridge, Roy, Outlaw and others to get good shots. He'd be having a similar affect for Indiana. He would certainly be an upgrade from the bench players they have now.

Teams should not rely on players who can "create shots for themselves" (*removed*). There's only about 6 of them in the league anyway who can do it without having a negative affect on their team. How 'bout Marbury...he's a guy with the reputation for being about to "create shots for himself"...is THAT what you think the Pacers need??? Really???

The Pacers need good shooters, good (and willing) passers, and players who play together and unselfishly. They need players who are unconcerned with individual stats and not prone to pouting.

Roy Munson
01-03-2008, 02:19 PM
http://blog.oregonlive.com/sportsupdates/2008/01/blazers_hope_to_start_new_stre.html

MINNEAPOLIS -- There came a time Wednesday when the Trail Blazers couldn't believe what they were seeing during their grind-it-out 90-79 win over Minnesota at the sleepy Target Center.

James Jones, the NBA's leading three-point shooter, was open in the corner.

Swish.

And then Jones, once again, was open in the same spot.

Swish.

And then again, Jones with time to load his shot and let fly.

Swish.

Five times in the second quarter, Sergio Rodriguez would drive and kick a pass to Jones, or push a transition break and find Jones, and all five times Jones hit the shot.

"I don't understand why teams leave that dude open," Jarrett Jack said. "It's like they don't know what type of player he is."

On Wednesday, Jones again showed he is the type of player who can change a game, scoring 13 of his 18 points in the first six minutes of the second quarter, propelling the Blazers to their fourth road win this season.


It was the Blazers' first game after their 13-game winning streak was snapped in Utah on Monday, and it reaffirmed what many of the players have been saying since the streak had ended: This young team is much more than just a 13-game flash-in-the-pan.

"I'm happy with the way we responded," said Brandon Roy, who struggled with his shot (8 for 21) but still finished with a team-high 24 points. "The big thing I was saying is, 'We gotta win this next game to show everybody that even though the streak was over, we are still a good team.' And I felt we did that. We showed we still have a lot to play for."

With the win, the Blazers (19-13) remained in second place by percentage points behind Denver (18-12) in the Northwest Division. And although many of the final statistics were unsightly -- the Blazers shot 39 percent, including 10 for 34 in the second half -- they were able to control the game thanks to a season-low four turnovers, which were one off the franchise record.

It was an emotionless game played in a quiet Target Center that was only half-filled. To make matters worse, the start was delayed 24 minutes to repair a gap between floor boards near halfcourt.

"The game had a weird feeling right from the start, being delayed," McMillan said. "I was thinking, 'This is not good.' And even though we won the first quarter (23-18), the rhythm never felt good."

Enter what McMillan likes to call "the white unit" -- his second quarter reserves, who on this night were led by Rodriguez, Jack and Jones. Immediately, the tempo picked up, as Rodriguez was jitter-bugging through the lane and zinging passes to Jones in the corner.

In the first six minutes of the second, Rodriguez had eight assists, putting him in position to tie the franchise record for assists in a quarter (10), set by Terry Porter in 1991. He never got the chance for the record, as McMillan reinserted Roy into the game, but by that time, the Blazers had a 44-32 lead and control of the game.

The eight assists were a season-high for Rodriguez, who has drifted into anonymity while playing brief stints in the second and fourth quarters. Afterward, while finishing the remains of what has become his traditional pregame meal -- chicken strips and fries -- Rodriguez downplayed his game-changing role.

"They made the baskets," Rodriguez said. "James played a hell of a game. Everybody was trying to get open, and I just find them. For me, it was just how the game was going. I'm always ready on the bench, and I'm always looking at what my teammates are doing and what we need. Then I go in there and just do the best I can do."

Of course, it makes it easier when Rodriguez is passing to Jones, who is having the best season of his five-year career. Jones, who has never made more than 40 percent of his three-pointers during his four-plus seasons, is now 33 for 65 (55.4 percent), while boosting his scoring average to a career-high 10.4 points.

"That's what we have sorely needed ever since I have been here," Jack said. "A guy who can make you pay if you leave him open."

In fact, Jones was being left so open during the second quarter that teammate Travis Outlaw said he was "getting mad," taking it as a sign of disrespect for Jones.

"They have to leave someone open, and it just happens to be me," Jones said. "But it's not so much a decision to leave me open, it was the options our offense was creating. Serg was the one who came in and changed everything with his penetration. Every coach will tell you to take away the layin and give up the three. So Serg gave us that burst that we needed, and it jump-started us and put them on their heals. The rest was history."

Still, the Blazers had trouble putting the finishing touches on the win, allowing Minnesota (427) to cut the lead to 60-56 in the third quarter. It wasn't until Roy hit a three-pointer at the end of the third to give the Blazers a 75-62 lead that the players could breathe a little easier.
Notes:LaMarcus Aldridge finished with 17 points and 11 rebounds, his team-leading seventh double double of the season. ... The Blazers have won four of their past five road games. ... Minnesota, which lost its sixth in a row, got 29 points and 16 rebounds from Al Jefferson.

Jason Quick: 503-221-4372; jasonquick@news.oregonian.com To read his "Behind the Beat" blog, go to http://blog.oregonlive.com/
behindblazersbeat

Kegboy
01-03-2008, 02:24 PM
I guess I just don't think James Jones is a great shooter.

Yeah, it's not like he's Kareem Rush or anything. :duck:

But hey, we shouldn't complain. We traded him for 1/3 of James White. :duck: :duck:

NapTonius Monk
01-03-2008, 02:29 PM
Key word for him: ROLE PLAYER...which we don't have enough of. We need more players who are willing to come in and fit a specific role for the sake of the team. Jones may have deficiencies to his game, but he would have been a valuable perimeter sniper to spread the floor, and take pressure off our bigs. If we had more of those guys, we'd be much better off. All the championship teams had valuable role playing personnel, in addition to their star play.

Shade
01-03-2008, 02:36 PM
The eight assists were a season-high for Rodriguez, who has drifted into anonymity while playing brief stints in the second and fourth quarters. Afterward, while finishing the remains of what has become his traditional pregame meal -- chicken strips and fries -- Rodriguez downplayed his game-changing role.

Rodriguez is on the Tinsley diet. :laugh:

Unclebuck
01-03-2008, 02:51 PM
Maybe it comes down to whether you believe the current Pacers players are getting good shots and just missing. If that is the case, then yes James Jones would help.

However if you believe the current Pacers players are not getting good shots and that rather than poor shooting is the cause for poor offense, then you need someone who can get others good shots. And without Tinsley especially, the Pacers are unable to get good shots, and are very easy to guard.

I tend to think our biggest offensive problem is our inability to get good shots. So rather than getting better shooters, I want a creator.

NapTonius Monk
01-03-2008, 03:27 PM
Maybe it comes down to whether you believe the current Pacers players are getting good shots and just missing. If that is the case, then yes James Jones would help.

However if you believe the current Pacers players are not getting good shots and that rather than poor shooting is the cause for poor offense, then you need someone who can get others good shots. And without Tinsley especially, the Pacers are unable to get good shots, and are very easy to guard.

I tend to think our biggest offensive problem is our inability to get good shots. So rather than getting better shooters, I want a creator.

I think we have a couple, but the lack of a decent backup point is causing them to play out of position, and to be relied upon more heavily than they should be.

Unclebuck
01-03-2008, 03:34 PM
I think we have a couple, but the lack of a decent backup point is causing them to play out of position, and to be relied upon more heavily than they should be.

And the more I see of Daniels at the point position the less I like him there. He needs to be a shooting guard or small forward, he makes some really bad decisions with the ball. he's better when he gets the ball in scoring position and can do what he does best which is get to the basket. And I think O'Brien is realizing that, because he had Owens and daniels in the game at times last night

Bball
01-03-2008, 04:11 PM
James Jones was one of the players that stepped UP in the brawl season and appeared to be a good citizen to boot. Why that earned him a ticket out of town, I'll never know. But when you're looking for reasons that there's a disconnect with fans, I'd say that is one of the symptoms of the problems.

-Bball

NapTonius Monk
01-03-2008, 06:11 PM
Refresh my memory please...who did we trade JJ for?

Hicks
01-03-2008, 06:21 PM
Refresh my memory please...who did we trade JJ for?

A second round draft pick from Phoenix.

indyman37
01-03-2008, 06:25 PM
A second round draft pick from Phoenix.
:duh:

NorCal_Pacerfan
01-04-2008, 01:02 AM
JJ helped seal the double OT win tonight against the Bulls. He had clutch free throws and a clutch block at the very end of the game.

The thing about JJ is that he's a class act, he works really hard, he's a great free throw shooter, and he's getting better on D. I've also seen him drive to the basket more often and get fouled, and he's just improving his game. Portland is lucky to have him and I wouldn't mind having him back on the Pacers. Anyway, I'll continue to root for him on the Blazers - I'm kinda rooting for them out west this year anyway so all the sweeter.

Big Smooth
01-04-2008, 01:32 AM
I guess I just don't think James Jones is a great shooter. yes he's shooting well to this point this season, but if you look at his entire career (and in Phoenix he got wide open shots all the time) his % doesn't indicate to me that he is a great shooter. He's a pretty good shooter, but I don't think anything more.

Here are his career stats.

FG% - 40.6
3-pt - 40%
FT% - 87%


What the Pacers offense needs more than shooters is someone who can create shots for himself, for his teammates and get to the free throw line - and JJ does none of those three things.

Maybe it's just me but a career 40% mark from downtown is pretty damn good. Posting those stats really does not discredit his game at all. Reggie shot .395 for his career from long range.

JayRedd
01-05-2008, 04:03 PM
Nate McMillin is really singing James Jones' praise of late.

"If I would say something really has (made a difference), yeah, I would say James more so than anything that we've talked about," McMillan said.

That's from this good article on the subject.

http://www.columbian.com/sports/localNews/2008/01/01042008_Commentary-Jones-is-just-playing-his-part.cfm



Commentary: Jones is just playing his part

Friday, January 04, 2008
By BRIAN HENDRICKSON, Columbian staff writer

James Jones deflected the compliment as if on impulse almost as soon as it was given.

It wasn't surprising - the Portland Trail Blazers forward never seems to do anything to stand out from his teammates. He melts into the crowd when he leaves the practice floor, and rarely lets a conversation focus on himself for very long.

So when Jones was told that his teammates and coach consider him to be the piece on the team that has made the biggest difference in the Blazers' turnaround, Jones calmly brushed it off.

"It's vice versa," he quickly retorted, "because if I didn't have guys to isolate and break down teams and get everyone to collapse, I wouldn't get open looks and get the ball rolling. It's a pure team here. Everyone plays a part, and everything I do, everything Steve (Blake) does and everything Brandon (Roy) does, it enhances what the next guy does."

It might be blown off as a

cliché if it didn't ring so true. Yes, the Blazers have been winning through their play as a unit and the tremendous chemistry they have shown. But there's something extra that Jones brings - something he will acknowledge, but for which he won't take too much credit - that has pushed the Blazers over the top in the last month.

Sure, there is his remarkable 55-percent 3-point shooting. But it goes beyond that.

It is the presence Jones holds on the court. The way he takes pride in knowing his shooting skills prompt his defenders to stick to him, leaving wide open passing and driving lanes for the Blazers' guards. The knack he has for always being in the right spot on the floor, and his ability to recognize situations and communicate them to teammates like a coach.

"He's helped make us a smarter team," said Brandon Roy. "People say, 'Man, they're really in a good rhythm.' And I think a lot of it has to do to James coming in and helping us. I'm a big fan of what he's done, and not just the threes he's made, but just his poise. His leadership is big for this young team."

The way teammates talk about Jones, you might think he was a former All-Star or NBA champion. But Jones is still only 27 and has mostly been a little-known reserve throughout his career. But his experiences are where the difference emerges.

He watched from Indiana's bench as Jermaine O'Neal and Reggie Miller led the Pacers to the Eastern Conference Finals. Then he helped Phoenix reach the Western Conference Finals, and saw Steve Nash take hom the league's most valuable player trophy.

And those skills the Blazers now covet - the poise, understanding of situations and willingness to coach on the floor? It all rubbed off from playing big games with those great players.

"I played with some great teams in Indiana, played with one of the best teams in history in Phoenix," Jones said. "And so you take things from great players, and that's all I've been trying to do is just impart a little bit of that to these guys."

And the perspective Jones developed from competing at the game's highest levels has provided the Blazers with a bonus that was not anticipated.

Sure, the 3-point shooting was expected - it was the biggest reason for last summer's draft-day trade. And it has certainly helped open the court for other players - it's no coincidence that many of Roy's drives are on Jones' side of the court, where the Blazers know defenders would rather risk a two-point shot from Roy than rotate off Jones and give up a three.

But it's Jones' experience that may offer the greatest value.

Just moments after McMillan told reporters last week that there was no single reason for Portland's sudden turnaround, he reconsidered once Jones' name was raised. But rather than focus on his shooting, McMillan talked about Jones' poise and experience. Jones, McMillan said, is an example of what the Blazers hope their other young players develop into.

"If I would say something really has (made a difference), yeah, I would say James more so than anything that we've talked about," McMillan said.

Now the Blazers hope Jones continues to selflessly show his young teammates the path to success, just as his former teammates did for him.

Brian Hendrickson is the Trail Blazers beat writer for the Columbian. Contact him at 360-759-8051 or brian.hendrickson@columbian.com. Read his Blazers Banter blog at columbiantalk.com/read/blogs.

bambam
01-05-2008, 07:26 PM
I haven't missed JJ at all since he left here. He's a nice guy and a decent player, but that is all. I wish him well


ya, why keep a guy around that isnt a thug

wintermute
01-05-2008, 11:17 PM
more jj love...

http://blog.oregonlive.com/behindblazersbeat/2008/01/the_essence_of_james_jones.html

The essence of James Jones
Posted by Jason Quick January 05, 2008 00:20AM

In Sunday's editions of The Oregonian, I write a short story on the Blazers player whose importance I think gets lost in the shuffle with the All-Star emergence of Brandon Roy, the explosion of Travis Outlaw and the grace of LaMarcus Aldridge.

I'm talking about James Jones.

I'm telling you, the guy is a pro in the truest sense. Such a great presence in the locker room, and such a heady - and extremely talented - player.

However, it's that last fact - his talent - that I think is being overshadowed because of his undeniable effect in the locker room. And I think that's a shame.

Besides leading the NBA in three-point percentage (53.6 percent, 37-of-69), and scoring a career-high 10.3 points, Jones does so many little things on the court that are often overlooked. He has stuck his nose in under-the-basket scrums countless times to tap rebounds to teammates. He has drawn charges. He has issued hard fouls, often times with 'What are you complaining about?' looks. And I can't remember him ever taking an ill-advised shot.

And not only has his sharp-shooting helped spread the defense, Jones is very savvy in realizing how, and why, to create space on the court between himself and his teammates.

"He has changed everything,'' Steve Blake said.

And, remarkably, Jones says he is still playing on "one-leg" because of the bruised left knee that caused him to miss 12 of the season's first 15 games.

It all furthers my opinion that the Blazers' basketball operations department, led by general manager Kevin Pritchard and assistant general manager Tom Penn, is a supreme evaluator of talent.

This summer, in the week leading up to the draft, the Blazers were in negotiations with the New York Knicks about a trade for Zach Randolph. The sides were close to settling midway through the first round when the Blazers became active in discussions with Phoenix for the 24th pick in the first round. The Blazers knew Phoenix was tying to unload salary in an attempt to avoid the luxury tax, sparking an idea by Penn. The new assistant general manager, in his third week on the job, suggested making a deal in which the Blazers added Fred Jones in the New York trade in order to receive a $3 million trade exception. That trade exception, in turn, could be used to relieve Phoenix of James Jones' $3 million salary in addition to acquiring the 24th pick.

So the Blazers turned to New York, with a new offer to include Fred Jones, along with Randolph and Dickau for Steve Francis and Channing Frye. Even by adding Jones' $3 million salary, the combined salaries of the players for each team were within the required 25 percent of each other. The deal was done, and the Blazers had their trade exception.

"In the course of players being moved in and out of the (New York) trade, the light went on with us,'' Penn recalled. "We realized if we did the deal we could get a trade exception for Fred Jones. We did the deal, got the trade exception, which we had a year to use. And it took Kevin 10 minutes to use it.''

Penn said he and Pritchard, and the Blazers scouting staff, were sold on Jones.

"We really valued him,'' Penn said. "And the way we looked at it, from a talent standpoint, we were trading Zach for Channing, James Jones and Rudy Fernandez, plus cap flexibility in two years (Steve Francis buyout).''
I don't know about you, but I would do that trade again right now. In fact, can you name one move that Kevin Pritchard has made that hasn't been good? I mean, really. Think about it.

Even though I said earlier that I feel Jones' locker room presence is getting more hype than his play, that hype is not without merit. He has this aura of coolness, serenity, intelligence and honesty that sets him apart from any athlete I've covered. There just isn't any way you spend time around the guy and not develop a level of respect for him.

And the beauty of it is none of it is for show.

He loves this team, and has said it from the start, and he wants to be a part of its growth. And to maximize his impact, Jones has realized the importance of nurturing and teaching his teammates the same way he was when he broke into the league in Indiana under the wing of Reggie Miller. He also has the perspective of how team basketball should be played, spending the past two years in Phoenix.

The biggest benefactors have been Martell Webster and Travis Outlaw. Several times this season, Travis has told me how Jones has instructed him - sometimes they are technical pointers, sometimes they are ways to condition his mindset. Meanwhile, McMillan has told me that Jones has been a remarkable mentor for Webster.

"James knows that Martell is the future, and he's not trying to take that kid's spot.'' McMillan said, admitting that he thought Jones would be his opening day starting small forward had he not been injured in the preseason. "He's trying to teach Martell how to play that position, and he's constantly talking to him and taken him under his wing.

"And in turn, Martell has been real supportive of James,'' McMillan said. "Martell is not complaining about playing the first and third quarter while James is playing the second and fourth. They both have that respect. And all of that comes from James taking Martell under his wing and trying to teach him.''

--Quick

Anthem
01-06-2008, 12:11 AM
"They have to leave someone open, and it just happens to be me," Jones said. "But it's not so much a decision to leave me open, it was the options our offense was creating. Serg was the one who came in and changed everything with his penetration. Every coach will tell you to take away the layin and give up the three. So Serg gave us that burst that we needed, and it jump-started us and put them on their heals. The rest was history."
Remember how I said I liked his demeanor?

NorCal_Pacerfan
01-06-2008, 07:07 PM
What's impressed me of late is that JJ seems to be 'clutch', coming up with big plays and scoring in the last minutes of a game.

Thing is this, JJ wasn't matured yet back when we let him go. I think his time under #31 and then in Phoenix, has helped him grow up. So, he's still growing, but he's a much better all around player now then he was before. So yeah, maybe he didn't seem like a big loss back then, but I'd take him back now in a heartbeat.

Bball
01-06-2008, 09:01 PM
You guys are forgetting what we parlayed that trade of James Jones into. You act like we lost him for nothing....

... Oh wait...

Nevermind...

-Bball

McKeyFan
01-07-2008, 11:07 AM
JJ's quotes also make me want to cry.

The guy is very intelligent, classy, insightful, and -- in greatest contrast to Bird's non-milk-drinkers -- selfless.

Also, in contrast to our two stellar players, he is clutch down the stretch.

I agree with UB that we need creators more than shooters at this point. But somewhere along the line the Pacers lost their soul, letting quintessential Indiana types like JJ slip away while providing more sickening enablement of self-centered immature players like Jackson and Tinsley.

If I had to guess, I'd say the poor slide in judgment of character traces back to Larry Bird. Great player, suspect manager, terrible evaluator of character.

Bball
01-07-2008, 12:38 PM
JJ's quotes also make me want to cry.

The guy is very intelligent, classy, insightful, and -- in greatest contrast to Bird's non-milk-drinkers -- selfless.

Also, in contrast to our two stellar players, he is clutch down the stretch.

I agree with UB that we need creators more than shooters at this point. But somewhere along the line the Pacers lost their soul, letting quintessential Indiana types like JJ slip away while providing more sickening enablement of self-centered immature players like Jackson and Tinsley.



:amen:

-Bball

MyFavMartin
01-07-2008, 08:21 PM
What's impressed me of late is that JJ seems to be 'clutch', coming up with big plays and scoring in the last minutes of a game.

Thing is this, JJ wasn't matured yet back when we let him go. I think his time under #31 and then in Phoenix, has helped him grow up. So, he's still growing, but he's a much better all around player now then he was before. So yeah, maybe he didn't seem like a big loss back then, but I'd take him back now in a heartbeat.

It shouldn't be surprising.

When Reggie was asked about what he thought of the young Pacers, he gushed over JJ... before you know it, he's traded for next to nothing.

Lamenting over management moves, why didn't we get Marcus Williams instead of Shawne Williams?