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View Full Version : Clutch performances - here's a difficult question



ChicagoJ
05-28-2004, 05:15 PM
I don't really want to think about this yet, but...

Many of us felt at the beginning of this series that every game would be close and would come down to which team makes "clutch plays". But if our only player in this series that plays great down the stretch of each game is Reggie... then what does that mean for our young core?

We clearly can't rely on Reggie forever. Personally, I'm not sure we can rely on Uncle Reg for even a report performance in this series, given his recent tendency to follow-up a big game with a couple of stinkers?

But if our young guys prove to not be up to the task, then what do you do?

Do you think "Clutch play" is something that's learned? Or do you think that its personality based? I think you either play better when the stakes are highest or you don't. IMO, Derrick McKey and Dale Davis were also great examples of players that played thier best when the stakes were highest.

But I just got off the phone with Jay's_Dad@Section222. His theory is that "clutch play" is the one thing that separates players that spent three or four years in college from most of the high school kids (notable exception: Kobe). (Of course, as a retired coach, he'd like to take credit for every clutch performance his players ever made. :rolleyes: )

:whoknows:

As I've said, now is when we finally can learn some stuff about our players. If nobody else but Reggie truly steps up, then I wonder how that might affect our team's roster this summer

I'll be much happier if one of our young guys delivers a game winning performance tonight.

BillS
05-28-2004, 05:24 PM
The thing is, "clutch play" is really one of those things that comes with the combination of confidence, ability, and maturity. You have to have all three.

Reggie made his career on them, but certainly didn't come out of the gate hitting the last-second three. For a few years, anyway, he wasn't even in the game at the last second ...

Today we don't doubt his maturity, we may wonder about his confidence during the game but certainly not at clutch time, but most of us think he's past his peak in ability.

The way somebody else steps up is to be put into the clutch position and to go for it. The problem is we didn't have very many clutch situations during the season, so we don't know who is the successful second option to Reggie.

Hicks
05-28-2004, 05:43 PM
Personally I feel Fred Jones is clutch. This is kind of petty, but in the 2002-03 preseason, Isiah ran a play for him to win the game, and he came threw by attacking and laying it in with pretty much no time left. I've also noticed he has a fire and confidence that others on the team seem to lack (or at least they don't show it in the same way as Fred), and I've heard he had a nice run in the NCAA tourney one year, which included him making clutch plays to keep his team in it for a couple rounds.

Snickers
05-28-2004, 05:55 PM
BillS' explanation is pretty good. I think it's a skill that can be honed over time, but some players just have it and some don't. I agree that Freddie has clutch ability [or at least the psychological capability for it], and I think Ron and Jeff do too.

It's got a lot to do with nerves; you can't hit big shots or make good late-game decisions if you're too nervous to think straight.

bulletproof
05-28-2004, 06:25 PM
The thing is, "clutch play" is really one of those things that comes with the combination of confidence, ability, and maturity. You have to have all three.

I'd agree with this, but you're missing one thing: opportunity. Reggie's had plenty, this core group of young players haven't. If we have more series like this in the coming years (like the 90s), I think we'll see who is and who isn't "clutch." Surely one or more of these young players will, given the other three things you mentioned.

Artestaholic
05-28-2004, 06:41 PM
Ron Artest is a very clutch player. He hasn't been in this serie,s, but dont forget the handfulls of clutch plays hes made since hes been here. He's definantly in the top % of clutch players in the NBA.

ChicagoJ
05-28-2004, 06:48 PM
So far everyone seems to think a clutch performance is something that's learned, not a 'trait' people are born with?

Not sure I agree.

ABADays
05-28-2004, 06:50 PM
I also think Freddie is going to be clutch. I think it's more than a learned process. I think you have to have the guts to pull the trigger and suffer any consequences.

MSA2CF
05-28-2004, 06:51 PM
It's both, I think.

Some people are just born for greatness.

Snickers
05-28-2004, 07:01 PM
So far everyone seems to think a clutch performance is something that's learned, not a 'trait' people are born with?

Not sure I agree.

I think it's about 75% trait and 25% learned/honed. Some guys just don't have it.

Artestaholic
05-28-2004, 07:13 PM
There was a great article on this in ESPN the magazine about a year or so ago. Some guy actually makes a living studying this and determining whether or not a player has what it takes to be clutch. Let me see if I can find an article on it.

able
05-28-2004, 07:46 PM
in part you are born with it, then you need to add some serious hard work over the years and then you can be clutch.

there is no doubt in my mind that next to Reggie JO is just as clutch.

goes to show that in the less valued clutch stats he is always in the top 1 - 5 .