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avoidingtheclowns
08-28-2007, 12:49 AM
At least she'll be able to sleep her way to the top...

lj3iNxZ8Dww

Anthem
08-28-2007, 01:13 AM
Yeah, I saw that. It hurts.

If we're going to start re-educating the world, maybe we should start in South Carolina.

Trader Joe
08-28-2007, 01:30 AM
I mean honestly what do you really expect?

Hoop
08-28-2007, 01:35 AM
She could be a speech writer for Bush. The similarities are scary, if she would have added a few "911's" and "hard work" it would have been perfect.

Bball
08-28-2007, 01:59 AM
She claims to have a 3.5GPA and that the question surprised her and she lost her train of thought.

I'd say not only did she lose her train of thought but that the train had already left the station entirely.

By the way... I saw that yesterday and it was painful to watch.

-Bball

bellisimo
08-28-2007, 05:20 AM
watching that gave me a headache ouch

DisplacedKnick
08-28-2007, 08:06 AM
That is one seriously petrified person. Complete froze with "blank brain syndrome."

I'm sure I've done that myself once or twice - never on national TV though - or even when someone happened to have film around.

If you ever want to be embarrased, read the transcripts of a deposition you give. When they transcribe every, "uhm", "er", "uh", "well, uh," "ya see" ... the first time I gave one it was just me and the interviewer. I felt fairly relaxed and answered the same way.

Learned my lesson with that - they sent me a copy to make sure I agreed with what I said (they had a tape so it was just a formality). I asked if they could maybe clean it up so I didn't sound like such a doofus. The answer was a pretty simple, "No."

Slick Pinkham
08-28-2007, 09:16 AM
That is hot. She is so dumb and simultaneously so georgeous.

If she were your girlfriend,

you would easily be able to convince her to do just about anything, anywhere, at any time, for any made-up reason.

But that level of stupidity would be hard to deal with in the long run.

Fool
08-28-2007, 09:29 AM
^This is the most honest answer I've ever seen. Kudos to you sir.

Unclebuck
08-28-2007, 09:52 AM
I don't know why President Bush is brought into this discussion.

More than anything I feel bad for her. It is obvious that she was expecting a certain type of question and had practiced certain answers and the question was nothing she expected, so she tried to use a prepared answer or maybe a combination of two or three prepared answers

bellisimo
08-28-2007, 11:22 AM
^This is the most honest answer I've ever seen. Kudos to you sir.


nice avatar :-p

Slick Pinkham
08-28-2007, 01:58 PM
blee
boohemahh
bludda blu
:drool:

^^ mental state caused by seeing bellisimo's avatar

Slick Pinkham
08-28-2007, 03:46 PM
here's the dumb blonde lost in the back yard:


http://www.misssouthcarolinausa.com/images/photos-teentitleholder/fullsize/upton-366_fs.jpg

Shade
08-28-2007, 05:50 PM
I think my brain just imploded.

Shade
08-28-2007, 05:51 PM
I don't know why President Bush is brought into this discussion.

More than anything I feel bad for her. It is obvious that she was expecting a certain type of question and had practiced certain answers and the question was nothing she expected, so she tried to use a prepared answer or maybe a combination of two or three prepared answers

Are you familiar with the No Child Left Behind program?

GrangerRanger
08-28-2007, 07:06 PM
Are you familiar with the No Child Left Behind program?

Thats not even a valid argument man. Wtf?

It was the teachers, George Bush wasn't in the classroom? He's the president, not god.

*Teacher taps a red button under her desk*

*George Bush jumps from his toilet, spilling his coffee in the process, before flying through the roof and to North Carliona*

"Where is the dumb girl," A frantic George Bush asks, his pants falling from his body from the sudden gush of the wind, and his legs stained with black coffee.

Is that what you think he should do?:rolleyes:

Gyron
08-28-2007, 08:24 PM
Didn't the no child left behind act start with Clinton? I'm to lazy to look it up right now though.

Edit: I looked it up....Ted Kennedy originally sponsored the bill. It was put into law in 2001.

So I guess Bush is technically tied to it. I know its very controversial but don't know enough about it to speak intelligently about it.

Shade
08-28-2007, 08:35 PM
Thats not even a valid argument man. Wtf?

It was the teachers, George Bush wasn't in the classroom? He's the president, not god.

*Teacher taps a red button under her desk*

*George Bush jumps from his toilet, spilling his coffee in the process, before flying through the roof and to North Carliona*

"Where is the dumb girl," A frantic George Bush asks, his pants falling from his body from the sudden gush of the wind, and his legs stained with black coffee.

Is that what you think he should do?:rolleyes:

I'm not arguing the relevance of the act, I'm just giving UB a reference of basis for the thread title (assuming that's what was meant by it).

LoneGranger33
08-28-2007, 09:06 PM
Are schools our absolutely terrible.

Hicks
08-28-2007, 09:14 PM
Are schools our absolutely terrible.

Speak for yourself. I wish people knew what the hell they were talking about when they say something as ignorant as that.

GrangerRanger
08-28-2007, 09:20 PM
Are schools our absolutely terrible.

Of course your going to say that.

Tell me how their terrible?

I like the 5th one btw..

LoneGranger33
08-28-2007, 09:26 PM
Speak for yourself. I wish people knew what the hell they were talking about when they say something as ignorant as that.

It was mostly a joke, but there are a lot of schools that are seriously underfunded. Also, there are a lot of bad teachers out there. I've been to some real crummy schools in the Boston area alone. What subject do you plan on teaching / and where? (I'm planning on teaching soon too, by the way)


Of course your going to say that.

Tell me how their terrible?

I like the 5th one btw..

I will take that into consideration. I just realized what you did there, or should I say their. I think you're right about 5 too.

Shade
08-28-2007, 09:28 PM
Are schools our absolutely terrible.

You can't script a line any better than that. :rotflmao:

:death:

Shade
08-28-2007, 09:30 PM
Of course your going to say that.

Tell me how their terrible?

I like the 5th one btw..

:lol:

:death:

Hicks
08-28-2007, 09:31 PM
I'm in elementary education K-6. All my experience and of course involvement in this field leads me to believe without a bit of doubt that it's not even close to as simple as people who say "our schools suck" want to think. Not by a long shot.

LoneGranger33
08-28-2007, 09:41 PM
I'm in elementary education K-6. All my experience and of course involvement in this field leads me to believe without a bit of doubt that it's not even close to as simple as people who say "our schools suck" want to think. Not by a long shot.

I think most of my "angst" comes from the fact that I don't think I learned that much in high school (or college for that matter). Certainly not too much of interest or value. But once again, I want to stress that my comments were merely an opportunity for me to switch "are" and "our" in what I perceived to be a comical fashion. Perhaps I was gravely mistaken.

Also, the fact that 20% of Americans can't find US on a map!? I mean, those kind of things shock you. And you may be right that the schools are not primarily to blame, but who? (Just to continue the conversation)

avoidingtheclowns
08-28-2007, 09:43 PM
the title was a joke. it was meant to be funny not political. bush does champion NCLB so i used president.


It was mostly a joke

i got it

but i'm also...


(you are) the most observant jerk I know

so...




and i vote for beta believe it, too soon for 'busta cappa' - not even a year since rio.

DisplacedKnick
08-28-2007, 11:28 PM
I don't particularly want to get into this but IMO requiring all students to pass rigid math and science requirements is one of the worst things our educational system can do.

In brief, our school system has developed to help teach students how to make decisions - not to memorize facts they could regurgitate. The reason is, our society requires more decision-making than any society ever has. There are tons of decisions we make on a daily basis that people in most societies may never make in their life. Things like what store to go to (most societies are lucky to have one store nearby), what route to take to work (many societies don't have work and most others use mass transit to get from point A to point B).

Go ahead and offer standardized math and science tests for students who want to pursue that, particularly for higher education. But the most important thing a school can do is help kids learn how to make good decisions - and how to go about learning if they want to know more about a given subject.

Back in the late 70's and early 80's was when we first started getting on this kick about memorizing facts - mainly because of the Japanese automotive industry, coupled with "made in Korea" and "made in China" products flooding in. The funny thing is, at the same time we wanted our system to become more like Japan's, they wanted theirs to be more like ours because their students were graduating with all kinds of factual knowledge but couldn't make decisions.

A society's education system should be reflective of what it takes to be successful in that society. In the US, the ability to make good decisions has always been more important than memorizing facts, as opposed to, say, Russia or China where you are told where you'll work, what store you'll shop at and are even given a ration which tells you what you're allowed to buy.

Though I don't want to get too extreme - a Middle School student should be able to find the US on a world map or globe. But I don't think having the pythagoreum theorum memorized should be a requirement for all HS students.

Arcadian
08-28-2007, 11:42 PM
Finding the US on a map is a first grade standard in CA.

bellisimo
08-29-2007, 06:28 AM
spoof of the video...

http://myspacetv.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=vids.individual&videoid=16914127

:) :) :)

bellisimo
08-29-2007, 06:29 AM
Finding the US on a map is a first grade standard in CA.


thats the thing though - come second grade they never see the map again...:rolleyes:

having travelled and attended schools in different countries one thing is certain...its not the system that is flawed - its the kids themselves.

GrangerRanger
08-29-2007, 07:00 AM
Well, LoneGranger actually does have a point. When George or Ted implanted this system it was for the better of our schools. I remember when I was in school, 8th through 12th,some people wouldn't do there work all year and still pass to the next grade. It is still sort of like this in a way, its ether the Government is being to lenient or the schools just aren't obeying.

Here is something else as well, when my parents were kids they would have been bent over and hammered.

<object width="425" height="350"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/99cw-wdHUwA"></param><param name="wmode" value="transparent"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/99cw-wdHUwA" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" wmode="transparent" width="425" height="350"></embed></object>

Fool
08-29-2007, 10:46 AM
spoof of the video...

http://myspacetv.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=vids.individual&videoid=16914127

:) :) :)

That's all kinds of mean, but even more kinds of funny.

Hicks
08-29-2007, 03:49 PM
Also, the fact that 20% of Americans can't find US on a map!? I mean, those kind of things shock you. And you may be right that the schools are not primarily to blame, but who? (Just to continue the conversation)

The philosophical answer is teachers can always do/try more. The practical one is some kids don't want to learn and they don't. They're bored for any number of reasons, and don't pay enough of attention or simply don't care enough, and they lose what they learn quickly. Social priorities are a typical substitute for what they focus on.

Passing students on even when they're getting D's and F's most of the time is a big problem IMO.

LoneGranger33
08-30-2007, 09:11 PM
Social priorities are a typical substitute for what they focus on.

Why do you think this is? (Just wondering)

Anthem
08-30-2007, 10:35 PM
Heh, this is great. People.com got her to do a video pop quiz.

I failed.

http://www.people.com/people/quiz/0,,20053640,00.html

avoidingtheclowns
08-30-2007, 11:44 PM
Ms. South Carolina has a 'Wall of Meaness' on her Facebook profile of people that have sent 'mean' emails/messages to her since her answer. Jezebel.com has the details (http://jezebel.com/gossip/the-american-titocracy/miss-teen-south-carolina-to-facebook-frenemies-victory-is-myn-295141.php).

LoneGranger33
08-31-2007, 01:07 AM
Heh, this is great. People.com got her to do a video pop quiz.

I failed.

http://www.people.com/people/quiz/0,,20053640,00.html

These are not on the same level as "where is the US?". I didn't have sound so I don't know what she was saying (I assume just reading the questions?), but a combination of educated guesses (my guesses went to three years of graduate school) and a very limited knowledge of the world allowed me to answer all 7 correct. I only really knew three of them though - the first and last ones were the easiest.

Los Angeles
08-31-2007, 01:48 AM
I don't particularly want to get into this but IMO requiring all students to pass rigid math and science requirements is one of the worst things our educational system can do.

In brief, our school system has developed to help teach students how to make decisions - not to memorize facts they could regurgitate. The reason is, our society requires more decision-making than any society ever has. There are tons of decisions we make on a daily basis that people in most societies may never make in their life. Things like what store to go to (most societies are lucky to have one store nearby), what route to take to work (many societies don't have work and most others use mass transit to get from point A to point B).

Go ahead and offer standardized math and science tests for students who want to pursue that, particularly for higher education. But the most important thing a school can do is help kids learn how to make good decisions - and how to go about learning if they want to know more about a given subject.

Back in the late 70's and early 80's was when we first started getting on this kick about memorizing facts - mainly because of the Japanese automotive industry, coupled with "made in Korea" and "made in China" products flooding in. The funny thing is, at the same time we wanted our system to become more like Japan's, they wanted theirs to be more like ours because their students were graduating with all kinds of factual knowledge but couldn't make decisions.

A society's education system should be reflective of what it takes to be successful in that society. In the US, the ability to make good decisions has always been more important than memorizing facts, as opposed to, say, Russia or China where you are told where you'll work, what store you'll shop at and are even given a ration which tells you what you're allowed to buy.

Though I don't want to get too extreme - a Middle School student should be able to find the US on a world map or globe. But I don't think having the pythagoreum theorum memorized should be a requirement for all HS students.

PREACH IT!!!

The most powerful resource Americans own is our creativity and our willingness to try new ideas. Intellectual property is the name of the game. Have an idea, apply it to a product, establish a brand, make it cool, sell it to the world.

Making our students conform to the numbers destroys the one great resource we have: our imaginations.

JayRedd
09-03-2007, 01:07 PM
Perhaps I was gravely mistaken.

Per usual.


Here is something else as well, when my parents were kids they would have been bent over and hammered.

Catholic school?

JayRedd
09-03-2007, 01:18 PM
I don't particularly want to get into this but IMO requiring all students to pass rigid math and science requirements is one of the worst things our educational system can do.


Go ahead and offer standardized math and science tests for students who want to pursue that, particularly for higher education. But the most important thing a school can do is help kids learn how to make good decisions - and how to go about learning if they want to know more about a given subject.


But I don't think having the pythagoreum theorum memorized should be a requirement for all HS students.

I was pretty upset when I realized that all post-algebra and geometry math that I'd learned was utterly non-useful in real life. Most of the algebra too really. The fact that I wasted precious moments of my life learning the pythagoreum theorum, prime factorization and how to find a cosine is ridiculous. Meanwhile, I have to call my landlord when the toilet breaks because no one ever taught me how to fix that. And although I went to what I consider a very, very good public school, they required learning this nonsense that I'd never use again and didn't even teach economics.

Seriously, aside from dividing up a check, finding percents, simple arithmetic, banking, fantasy sports and playing around with sports statistics otherwise, I have very little use for math in my life. I guess I'm glad I learned it and understand numbers, but it's not particularly useful. (I guess learning math helps in learning science, too, but whatever.)

Anthem
09-03-2007, 03:14 PM
I'm not against learning math... it's brain exercise. The ability to solve problems according to rules is not a bad skill to have.

I wish public schools worried less about calc, though, and spent more time on stats. Most people are really bad at stats.

Los Angeles
09-03-2007, 03:55 PM
i'll back up Anthem. Understanding statistics is monumentally useful to me.

Anthem
09-03-2007, 04:12 PM
i'll back up Anthem. Understanding statistics is monumentally useful to me.
Stats are thrown around so much today that you almost have to have a basic understanding to tell when people are pulling your chain.

Of course, there's a math skill that's very important that a ton of people don't know: financial math. Balancing a checkbook would be a big step forward for a lot of people, but I wish schools taught more in the way of amortization, APRs, and so on.

JayRedd
09-03-2007, 04:39 PM
I'm not against learning math... it's brain exercise. The ability to solve problems according to rules is not a bad skill to have.

I wish public schools worried less about calc, though, and spent more time on stats. Most people are really bad at stats.

Clearly, you're right.

But like you, I just wish school's would teach the right math. Derivatives, trigonomotry and advanced algebra just don't come up all that often for non-engineers, physicists, chemists and the like.

Can't really recall the last time I needed to use the law of tangents to find a length the hypotanous of a right triangle, but I do know that I had to pay an overdraft fee to my bank a few weeks ago because I forgot to balance my check book properly.

Stats should be at the forefront of curriculums too. A lot of people are easilly confused or purposely misled by studies and surveys because they don't really understand what the numbers mean. Lies, damn lies and statistics, right.

Los Angeles
09-03-2007, 04:45 PM
The best part of statistics is understanding terms like "mutually exclusive" and "probability". I'm talking the basic basics.