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View Full Version : How is First-Round Pick Williams Progressing? (Pacers.com)



Eindar
12-04-2006, 03:17 AM
Didn't see this on the Pacers section, and it's got something very interesting in it. Here's the link and article:

http://www.nba.com/pacers/news/question_061201.html

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How Is First-Round Pick Williams Progressing?

Friday, Dec. 1, 2006 If you'd like to pose a Question of the Day to Conrad Brunner, submit it along with your full name and hometown to Bruno's_mailbag@pacers.com. Brunnerís opinions are his own and do not necessarily reflect those of Pacers players, coaches or management.

Q. I was wondering if we might get to see rookie Shawne Williams soon? And since you sometimes attend practices, has he progressed any since preseason? (From Jeremy in Indianapolis)

A. Since training camp, when the Pacers wanted Williams to learn both the small forward and power forward positions, things have changed for the rookie. For the time being, his primary responsibility has shifted to small forward. This may not sound like a big deal but it is significant. Danny Granger, a four-year college player, was nearly overwhelmed last season when handed the same challenge. He eventually digested the material but it was a struggle for much of the season. Williams had just one year of collegiate preparation, so you can imagine the daunting nature of the material.

Having clarified his assignments, the next step is to learn the offensive and defensive schemes well enough that they become instinctive. Young players often are caught thinking out on the floor, processing play calls in order to go to the right spot, rather than immediately reacting. Williams has learned the systems and is in the process of developing them into second nature. The problem is, now that the season is in full swing, practice time is valuable and built around players already in the lineup and rotations. Young players like Williams have to show up early, leave late and do a lot of work either on their own or with the aid of an assistant coach.

It's beginning to look like the Pacers will use their D-League affiliation with Albuquerque in hopes of hastening Williams' development. Because he had so little college experience, the value of game competition even at a lower level could be very valuable for Williams. Albuquerque has a high-quality coach in Michael Cooper and has been a successful franchise to the experience should be positive. The good news is, with Al Harrington and Granger on hand, the Pacers don't have a pressing need for Williams to play at the NBA level right away. That should allow him to develop at his own rate so that when his day comes, he will be fully ready.

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Have the Pacers had a change of heart regarding certain (stupid) policies? I certainly applaud having Williams learn one position at a time, and would love to see him get some PT in the D-League. If nothing else, it should help him appreciate the NBA and encourage him to work harder to ensure he has a future in it.

This brings up another question. If the D-League had been around in, say, 1999, how would that have impacted Jonathan Bender?

Peck
12-04-2006, 03:41 AM
Didn't see this on the Pacers section, and it's got something very interesting in it. Here's the link and article:

http://www.nba.com/pacers/news/question_061201.html

--

How Is First-Round Pick Williams Progressing?

Friday, Dec. 1, 2006 If you'd like to pose a Question of the Day to Conrad Brunner, submit it along with your full name and hometown to Bruno's_mailbag@pacers.com. Brunnerís opinions are his own and do not necessarily reflect those of Pacers players, coaches or management.

Q. I was wondering if we might get to see rookie Shawne Williams soon? And since you sometimes attend practices, has he progressed any since preseason? (From Jeremy in Indianapolis)

A. Since training camp, when the Pacers wanted Williams to learn both the small forward and power forward positions, things have changed for the rookie. For the time being, his primary responsibility has shifted to small forward. This may not sound like a big deal but it is significant. Danny Granger, a four-year college player, was nearly overwhelmed last season when handed the same challenge. He eventually digested the material but it was a struggle for much of the season. Williams had just one year of collegiate preparation, so you can imagine the daunting nature of the material.

Having clarified his assignments, the next step is to learn the offensive and defensive schemes well enough that they become instinctive. Young players often are caught thinking out on the floor, processing play calls in order to go to the right spot, rather than immediately reacting. Williams has learned the systems and is in the process of developing them into second nature. The problem is, now that the season is in full swing, practice time is valuable and built around players already in the lineup and rotations. Young players like Williams have to show up early, leave late and do a lot of work either on their own or with the aid of an assistant coach.

It's beginning to look like the Pacers will use their D-League affiliation with Albuquerque in hopes of hastening Williams' development. Because he had so little college experience, the value of game competition even at a lower level could be very valuable for Williams. Albuquerque has a high-quality coach in Michael Cooper and has been a successful franchise to the experience should be positive. The good news is, with Al Harrington and Granger on hand, the Pacers don't have a pressing need for Williams to play at the NBA level right away. That should allow him to develop at his own rate so that when his day comes, he will be fully ready.

--

Have the Pacers had a change of heart regarding certain (stupid) policies? I certainly applaud having Williams learn one position at a time, and would love to see him get some PT in the D-League. If nothing else, it should help him appreciate the NBA and encourage him to work harder to ensure he has a future in it.

This brings up another question. If the D-League had been around in, say, 1999, how would that have impacted Jonathan Bender?


That really would have depended on Jon Bender. He would have had to have been willing to learn & participate.

What it would have done though was show the Pacers where he was in real game situations so that if he didn't show he was ready he would not have gotten that contract extension he got.

If Jon would have done it & actively particiapated in it? I think it would have made all of the differance in the world. I think he would have been given a role & worked on it, instead of just floating from three point line to three point line.

His entire approach to the game would have been better & certainly his overal fundamental understanding of the game would have been better.

But I could be wrong.

Kegboy
12-04-2006, 10:17 AM
Even if they don't send him down, I appreciate that they're talking about it as a possibility, instead of being elitist and saying he'd be better sitting and watching.

Peck
12-04-2006, 12:19 PM
Even if they don't send him down, I appreciate that they're talking about it as a possibility, instead of being elitist and saying he'd be better sitting and watching.

I forgot to talk about the topic at hand. I agree with Kegboy on this.