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View Full Version : Yao Ming - Rejected



Moses
11-21-2006, 03:36 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aAmKppkDVBA

In case anyone missed it. That's plain nasty.

Slick Pinkham
11-21-2006, 04:20 PM
Did Nate hit him in the face with the follow though or did the ball just hit him in the face?

Pretty impressive hops there.

It looked a little like an Oompa Loompa revolting against Mr. Wonka.

pizza guy
11-21-2006, 11:42 PM
I think Nate got him on the way down.

Either way, that's absolutely crazy. It should be illegal. Wow.

I'm pretty sure that when Yao doubles over grabbing his eye, he's STILL taller than Nate! ;) That's crazy.

Roy Munson
11-22-2006, 12:10 PM
It should be illegal.

It IS illegal. That's a big-time foul. You can't whack someone in the face while blocking a shot, whether it's before, during, or after the block.

It's amazing that a guy 20 inches shorter can block the shot, but he DID foul Yao pretty badly.

Score another one for bad officiating.

pizza guy
11-22-2006, 12:26 PM
My guess is the refs were so shocked, they forgot to officiate for a moment. It was a foul, for sure, but an amazing play otherwise.

Pitons
11-22-2006, 12:30 PM
It IS illegal. That's a big-time foul. You can't whack someone in the face while blocking a shot, whether it's before, during, or after the block.

It's amazing that a guy 20 inches shorter can block the shot, but he DID foul Yao pretty badly.

Score another one for bad officiating.

The block was clean. But after the block was a foul. But both ways (referees should have whistled or not) this amazing block (man, Nate is 20 (>0,5 meters) or so inches shorter)) should have been written in Nates' stats.

Since86
11-22-2006, 02:07 PM
It IS illegal. That's a big-time foul. You can't whack someone in the face while blocking a shot, whether it's before, during, or after the block.

It's amazing that a guy 20 inches shorter can block the shot, but he DID foul Yao pretty badly.

Score another one for bad officiating.

You'd be laughed at in a pickup game and told to get real, let alone in the NBA, if you tried to call a foul for contact after a clean block like that.

You'd be told to go play with the girls, to man up, or quit being a bit**.

It's unfortunate that he got hit in the face, but that's just how it goes. If he got hit in the arm, it wouldn't be anything. It's called unintentional contact for a reason.

Roy Munson
11-22-2006, 05:07 PM
You'd be laughed at in a pickup game and told to get real, let alone in the NBA, if you tried to call a foul for contact after a clean block like that.

You'd be told to go play with the girls, to man up, or quit being a bit**.

It's unfortunate that he got hit in the face, but that's just how it goes. If he got hit in the arm, it wouldn't be anything. It's called unintentional contact for a reason.

"It's called unintentional contact for a reason"....OK, what would that reason be...because it was unintentional? OK, Einstein, I think I get it.

It's still a foul. There is no rule that distinguishes between intentional and unintentional contact. A foul is a foul, whether the offender meant to do it or not.

Since86
11-22-2006, 05:13 PM
Just because it's a foul, doesn't mean it should be called.
Just because it's a travel, doesn't mean it should be called.

If you want to nit-pick on every single possession, games would take 5 hrs, and it would end up one-on-one because everyone would foul out. There's a difference between the rule, and the spirit of the rule.

The rule is black and white. The spirit of the rule is the grey area, and open to interpretation.

Slick Pinkham
11-22-2006, 05:19 PM
Just because it's a foul, doesn't mean it should be called.
Just because it's a travel, doesn't mean it should be called.

If you want to nit-pick on every single possession, games would take 5 hrs, and it would end up one-on-one because everyone would foul out. There's a difference between the rule, and the spirit of the rule.

The rule is black and white. The spirit of the rule is the grey area, and open to interpretation.

The usual interpretation is that if the contact affects the outcome of the play, then it should be called.

Obviously Yao is left there doubled over as everybody runs the other way. And he would have scored had he not been blocked and fouled. You can't separate the block from the foul-- it was one continuous event. If you can't block a shot without fouling on the follow-through, then you should not get credit for making a block, however small you are.

The violation (in this case a foul) obviously DID affect the play, and it was an absolute mistake to not call it.

Since86
11-22-2006, 05:39 PM
How did the foul affect the outcome of that play?

He couldn't score without the ball, and he didn't have the ball when he was fouled.

EDIT: Basketball and it's rules aren't as clear cut as some people tend to think. There's a lot of stuff that happens that isn't legal but is allowed. Prime example: boxing out.

People yell for JO to box out, but you're basically yelling at him for not fouling. Anytime you phsyically move someone (boxing out) that's a foul. They have just as much right to that space as you do, but the stronger one/better position wins. Under the rules, it's a foul so should it be called? NO!

Rooting someone off of the blocks while playing defense is also a foul, but unless you just blantantly shove them, it's never called. Why? Because the rules aren't black and white. Contact is allowed, even though the rules say there should be none.

If he smacked him in the face before he blocked the shot, it should have been called. But Yao's scoring opportunity (the play) was over. It didn't affect that particular play.

Slick Pinkham
11-22-2006, 05:51 PM
He prevented a basket by Yao by blocking the shot and fouling him in a single continuous motion.

His action prevented a basket and also prevented Yao from transitioning to defense as he was doubled over in pain from being fouled.


People yell for JO to box out, but you're basically yelling at him for not fouling. Anytime you phsyically move someone (boxing out) that's a foul. They have just as much right to that space as you do, but the stronger one/better position wins.

If you have ever played the game at any level you would know that boxing out involves beating a man to a spot with your feet, then holding that space if and when he tries to move you off that spot. You hustle to the spot and then prepare yourself to ABSORB the contact, not to dish it out. It is not a pushing match to see who is stronger and thus gains the right to occupy that spot on the floor. Boxing out is mostly about hustle and intelligence (knowing what spot to go to especially requires high hoops IQ). Strength comes into play only in being able to hold your ground and not get off balance when the opponent comes into you.

If you can't tell the difference between taking a shot to the face and boxing somebody out, then we are just wasting time trying to explain it to you.

Since86
11-22-2006, 06:00 PM
He prevented a basket by Yao by blocking the shot and fouling him in a single continuous motion.

The ball was out of Yao's possession by the time he hit him in the face. The ball had been blocked. There was zero possible way for Yao to score before he was hit in the face whatsoever.


His action prevented a basket and also prevented Yao from transitioning to defense as he was doubled over in pain from being fouled.

Different play. You yourself even said if it affect THAT play. It's what you highlited so should be easy to find.


If you have ever played the game at any level you would know that boxing out involves beating a man to a spot with your feet, then holding that space if and when he tries to move you off that spot. You hustle to the spot and then prepare yourself to ABSORB the contact, not to dish it out.

If you can't tell the difference between taking a shot to the face and boxing somebody out, then we are just wasting time trying to explain it to you.

In all my years of playing and being around coaches, I have yet to find one that doesn't teach you to box out by moving your body into them and pushing them back. You don't box out by just maintaining contact, that's plain dumb. You phsyically move them from the spot, because if you don't they will. They're going to push you right under the rim. You push back harder, or atleast the same amount of force if you box out.

Obviously I am wasting my time, if you're gonna tell to tell me you don't push on someone while boxing out. If that's the way you boxed out when you played, then I can't see you getting many rebounds. Basketball is a very phsyical sport, and the most phsyical usually get the benefits.

You can't expect a foul to be called every time one is committed, PERIOD. End of story. Yao getting hit in the face wasn't the reason he didn't score. It was a good no call.

owl
11-22-2006, 06:26 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aAmKppkDVBA

In case anyone missed it. That's plain nasty.

I was not impressed. Yao was barely at rim height. Good timing by Nate.

Cactus Jax
11-22-2006, 08:24 PM
I would call a post-shot foul on Nate. During the duration of Yao's shot he made a legal play, but afterwards he fouled him, plain and simple. The ball would be inbounded by the Rockets if not in the penalty or free-throws if they were.

Slick Pinkham
11-22-2006, 09:56 PM
Yao getting hit in the face wasn't the reason he didn't score. It was a good no call.

:rolleyes:

Yao didn't score because his shot was blocked, however, the defender was not in a position to block the shot without also fouling on the follow-through.

The follow-through is part of the play. If I shoot a 3-pointer and you are running at me, I get the shot off, and afterwards you crash into me, IT IS STILL A FOUL!!!!! EVEN THOUGH I ALREADY GOT THE SHOT OFF!!! WHETHER IT WENT IN OR NOT!!!

This is not difficult. I think you can understand the concept of continuation.

Now if you just brushed into me after my shot, there is no call.

The contact on Yao was NOT incidental contact. He was raked across the face. Cactus Jax and everyone else in this thread except you are seeing it 100% right. Side out, Houston, foul on the Knicks.

Mr.ThunderMakeR
11-22-2006, 11:49 PM
Nevermind the hit in the face afterwards, there is PLENTY of contact before and during the block. Watch it closely. Yao is moving towards the basket and Nate jumps in his path. If Nate would have had his feet planted, it would have been a charge on Yao. But Nate is five friggin feet in the air so its obviously a blocking foul on Nate. Even further, Im pretty sure Nate was inside the 3 foot mark so he couldn't have gotten the charge anyways.

This highlight is already overplayed and overhyped and I'm sick of it. Of course someone's gonna miss a shot if you jump on top of them, no matter how short you are.

Moses
11-23-2006, 02:53 AM
Only thing this thread is missing is a Quis vs Jackson debate and a grammar war and it then it can be closed.

Will Galen
11-23-2006, 03:10 PM
The ball was out of Yao's possession by the time he hit him in the face. The ball had been blocked. There was zero possible way for Yao to score before he was hit in the face whatsoever.

A foul is a foul!

You go up to block a shot and you do it cleanly, but then your body wipes the shooter out it's a foul. It's the same deal here they just didn't call it.

I could prevent Yao from scoring too if you give me a shotgun, of course the follow though will probably hut him . . . a lot.

Big Smooth
11-23-2006, 08:42 PM
I enjoyed seeing that. Foul or not. :D

Moses
11-23-2006, 10:34 PM
I enjoyed seeing that. Foul or not. :D
That makes two of us.

Arguing about whether it was a foul or not isn't going to change the fact that a 5'8 guy blocked a 7'5 guy in the NBA. I don't care if he fouled him after he blocked the shot. It's just something you rarely will ever see. Kind of like when Runi blocked JO...in fact, I think that is the only time Runi has ever made a defensive play in his entire career.