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View Full Version : Artest wants to fight Ben Wallace, says he'd beat him in "one round"



Shade
11-04-2006, 11:00 PM
He just never stops, does he? :rolleyes:

http://www.suntimes.com/sports/basketball/bulls/123895,CST-SPT-bsep04.article


Artest looking for a fight
<!-- Article Publsih Date -->
November 4, 2006
<!-- Article By Line --> BY BRIAN HANLEY (bhanley@suntimes.com) Staff Reporter
<!-- boxscore --><!-- Article's First Paragraph -->
In theory, Ben Wallace against Ron Artest might be among the best boxing matches the United Center has hosted.
And among the shortest, if Artest is to believed.

''One round,'' said a matter-of-fact Artest, when asked how long he thought it would take to defeat Wallace.

Artest apparently has not let go of the hard feelings from the brawl-starting, shoving match he had with Wallace on Nov. 19, 2004, at The Palace of Auburn Hills. The incident, which spilled into the stands and involved fans, cost Artest a season-ending suspension of 73 games, which translated into $5.4 million.

''I definitely wanted to fight him, I still want to fight him, but not on the basketball court,'' Artest said Friday before he and Wallace met in an NBA game for the first time since the incident. ''Not tonight. No, you don't have to clear the first 10 rows.''

Just in case, the league sent Stu Jackson, the NBA's de facto dean of discipline, to make sure the Bulls' home opener vs. Sacramento didn't develop into a Don King production.

Wallace, then the center for the Detroit Pistons, said he was not expecting any explanation at the time from Artest, then a forward with the Indiana Pacers.

''And I don't need one now,'' Wallace said. ''I'm just looking to play basketball.''

Artest, who was booed during his introduction, said he had no plans to tell Wallace anything.

''I'll just slap fives like I do with every player before the game,'' said Artest, who actually slapped the behind of each of the Bulls starters. Wallace ignored him, but after the game hugged Artest in the Kings' locker room.
''If it was Detroit and Indiana, it would be different,'' Artest said. ''Maybe a little bit more, I guess, anxiety over it. Right now, it's totally two different teams.''

Sacramento coach Eric Musselman may have been the best man to assess both Artest and Wallace. He was an assistant at Orlando when Wallace spent the 1999-2000 season with the Magic.

And Musselman made it sound as if the two have some similar work habits and defensive skills.

''Ben Wallace, at that time, was the nicest guy in the world; the most down to earth, and the hardest worker,'' Musselman said. ''He practiced and played as if it was his last practice and his last game every time I was around him. The first time we had him in Orlando that first practice, [we] never [thought] he'd be an All-Star and be a guy that everybody in the league talks about.

''It speaks volumes of his work ethic, how far he's come as player, and the belief he had in himself. He fought to be in this league. Some people thought maybe he'd be a small forward who had to develop his shot because of his lack of size. He knew what he was and he carved a niche, and developed a reputation.''

Artest also has impressed his new head coach.


''He's the last one to leave the practice floor,'' Musselman said. ''He's much more mature than maybe people give him credit for.''

Artest believes the incident with Wallace has kept him from earning more than the one defensive player of the year award he won (2003-04).
''My mistakes, you know,'' he said. ''I messed up. So many things happen in someone's life, you can't really focus on everything, big or small.''

bhanley@suntimes.com (bhanley@suntimes.com)

Young
11-04-2006, 11:09 PM
http://www.realgm.com/src_wiretap_archives/43094/20061104/wallace_wanders_into_the_sacramento_locker_room/

Artest, Wallace make up, but Bulls' opener a downer

November 4, 2006
By Paul Ladewski Staff writer
The Bulls home opener vs. the Sacramento Kings attracted more than a sellout crowd Friday night at the United Center, it turned out.

The NBA police also had a trained eye on the goings-on, albeit for a different reason.

While the game was billed as the main event, the undercard pitted Kings bad boy Ron Artest against Bulls center Ben Wallace in their first confrontation since the infamous riot in Detroit two years earlier.

Artest was a member of the Indiana Pacers and Wallace was with the Pistons at the time.

"I'll just slap fives like I do to every player before the game," Artest said of his intentions.

Sure enough, Artest patted each Bulls player on the backside -- and Wallace ignored him all the while.

Then Artest got some semblance of revenge in the form of an 89-88 victory, which his team stole in the final minute.

After guard Chris Duhon threw away an inbounds pass, Kings counterpart Kevin Martin drained a 21-footer for the lead with 6.4 seconds on the clock. On the next possession, Duhon dribbled the ball off his foot on a hard drive to the basket.

"This is a game we should have won," Bulls head coach Scott Skiles said. "We played a pretty poor game all the way around but put ourselves in position to win with a flurry at the five-minute mark (of the fourth quarter). But we weren't able to close it out. We made mistake after mistake."

Guard Mike Bibby led the Kings with 30 points, while Artest contributed 22 points and 13 rebounds.

Forward Andres Nocioni scored eight of his 14 points in the fourth quarter, while forward Luol Deng finished with a career-best 29 points.

"We need to take care of business at home," Nocioni said. "Too many turnovers (24). I played terrible. I know how I play. That's it."

As for Artest and Wallace, the two made peace after the game.

Wallace sought out Artest in the Kings locker room and hugged him. Then they met with the Rev. Jesse Jackson, who was among those on hand.

Although the brawl cost him a 73-game suspension and $5.4 million in salary, Artest said the incident was behind him.

Still, Artest hasn't forgotten his dream of a pay-per-view fight against Wallace in the future, which he had made known shortly after the incident.

"I definitely wanted to fight him," said Artest, who played with the Bulls for two-plus season. "I still want to fight him, but not on the basketball court, though."

Artest believes the bout would be a rather short one, naturally.

"One round," Artest said when asked how long it would take for him to claim victory.

It appeared the Bulls would require one half to knock out the Kings, but the visitors refused to go away. Martin scored 12 points in the third period, as the visitors erased a six-point deficit to pull into a 62-all tie.

"I don't know what to say," said guard Kirk Hinrich (15 points, 6 assists). "We absolutely gave this game away."

AesopRockOn
11-04-2006, 11:13 PM
"Artest, who was booed during his introduction, said he had no plans to tell Wallace anything."

Lol @ Ron's trickiness.

Unclebuck
11-04-2006, 11:25 PM
Do we have to do this. Does every Artest comment (especially one that was made 3 days ago) deserve its own thread.

I mean I don't start a new thread about Artest everytime he has a good game. In fact I don't think I've started an Artest thread since he was traded. I might make mention of him in the NBA thread, but that is it

RamBo_Lamar
11-04-2006, 11:33 PM
''I'll just slap fives like I do with every player before the game,'' said Artest, who
actually slapped the behind of each of the Bulls starters. Wallace ignored
him, but after the game hugged Artest in the Kings' locker room.

So first he wants to fight Wallace, then Wallace gives him a hug after getting
slapped on his behind.

Sounds kind of kinky actually (LMAO).....

:crazy:

grace
11-04-2006, 11:35 PM
We could talk about Brad instead. Or Anthony Johnson. He's been playing pretty good tonight.

grace
11-04-2006, 11:37 PM
So first he wants to fight Wallace, then Wallace gives him a hug after getting
slapped on his behind.

Sounds kind of kinky actually (LMAO).....

:crazy:

No, it sounds like sports to me. Actually I'd prefer they go around slapping each other on the hind end. As far as I'm concerned there's too much hugging in basketball.

Los Angeles
11-05-2006, 12:18 AM
I think it's really funny that Rev. Jesse Jackson was the middle man in the makeup session.

Whoever published that first article AFTER the make-up meeting gets an 'F' in journalism.