PDA

View Full Version : I actually feel kinda bad for Jack right now



Shade
10-12-2006, 08:52 PM
He's involved in a civil suit, a criminal suit, his probation has been doubled, and he's told not to come to practice. Not to mention he may be involved in another civil suit or two from the "new" brawl. Ouch.

Kstat
10-12-2006, 08:57 PM
It all goes back to the "what are you doing outside a strip club at 3am with a gun?" question.

Yes, all the above things were legal (to that point).

However, simply because you CAN do something doesn't mean you SHOULD.

If Stephen Jackson was a nobody, we wouldn't be having this discussion.

The problem is, Stephen Jackson chose this profession, knowing everything that came with it, and the sacrifices that need to be made sometimes, such as not putting yourself in a position to need a handgun at 3am outside a strip club.

The VAST majority of pro athletes don't put themselves in the same position. They hire bodyguards. They watch where they spend their free time. They have friends to do things they know they shouldn't be doing themselves because of who they are.

I think Jackson's problem is, he didn't understand that as a professional athlete, he can't afford to take the risks the average joe can take. It comes with the territory.

imawhat
10-12-2006, 08:58 PM
I feel bad for him in a Darryl Strawberry kind of way.

Leisure Suit Larry
10-12-2006, 08:58 PM
Yeah Jack needs to realize he is not a person and should not make mistakes.

Hicks
10-12-2006, 08:59 PM
He's involved in a civil suit, a criminal suit, his probation has been doubled, and he's told not to come to practice. Not to mention he may be involved in another civil suit or two from the "new" brawl. Ouch.

I'm not one to usually turn to scripture (in fact until now I never have to my recollection), but I find it hits the nail squarely on the head for me:

A man reaps what he sows. The one who sows to please his sinful nature, from that nature will reap destruction

Unclebuck
10-12-2006, 09:14 PM
The crazy thing is 1 week ago right now, Jackson was considering whether he should go out or not, he decided to and look what happened. Overall I feel bad for him, yes he deserves a lot of this, but he's had some bad luck and just as a person I feel bad for him.

BlueNGold
10-12-2006, 09:49 PM
Yes, Jack is in a tough spot right now. Everything is going against him, not all of which is his own doing. First, he just violated probation for the Detroit fiasco. That was his bad, but there is much more. We just got through with an extremely violent summer of killings in the city. Brizzi is on TV talking tough and you can bet he will back it up. The current political climate for Jack could not be worse. ...and Jack better hope the judge is not a Pacer fan too.

Kegboy
10-12-2006, 10:14 PM
I'm surprised nobody's played the "You're not a real fan if you feel sorry for a millionaire" card yet.

ABADays
10-12-2006, 11:04 PM
I can't think of a single thing I feel sorry about for him.

Shade
10-12-2006, 11:16 PM
I'm surprised nobody's played the "You're not a real fan if you feel sorry for a millionaire" card yet.

SUPPORTING JACK = SUPPORTING PACERS?

Unclebuck
10-12-2006, 11:17 PM
I can't think of a single thing I feel sorry about for him.

How about just on a human level, as in he's throwing his NBA career away. Here was an undrafted guy who worked his way up into a starting position on an NBA team and signed a lucrative contract. I feel bad for him, but my loyalties are to the pacers, so they come first to me, but on a purely human level I feel bad for him, I don't like to see people screw up, I don't get any joy out of it, no matter who it is

vapacersfan
10-12-2006, 11:20 PM
How about just on a human level, as in he's throwing his NBA career away. Here was an undrafted guy who worked his way up into a starting position on an NBA team and signed a lucrative contract. I feel bad for him, but my loyalties are to the pacers, so they come first to me, but on a purely human level I feel bad for him, I don't like to see people screw up, I don't get any joy out of it, no matter who it is

Exactly!

We all make mistakes, its just some of us make bigger mistakes then others, and some of us have all of our mistakes aired all over the news and talk shows.

Jack messed up big time, and I will never defend him, but I think its pretty low to say you cant feel bad for him at all.

Robertmto
10-12-2006, 11:24 PM
Yeah Jack needs to realize he is not a person and should not make mistakes.

:rolleyes:

you are completely missing the point. This isn't the first mistake of this kind, and obviously he doesn't learn from his mistakes.

owl
10-12-2006, 11:38 PM
:rolleyes:

you are completely missing the point. This isn't the first mistake of this kind, and obviously he doesn't learn from his mistakes.


I do feel sorry for him. But he has not learned from his way of doing things.
What he needs is a heart transplant, and I am speaking on a spiritual level
and I believe there is only one person who can do that for him.

owl

JayRedd
10-13-2006, 12:26 AM
How about just on a human level, as in he's throwing his NBA career away. Here was an undrafted guy who worked his way up into a starting position on an NBA team and signed a lucrative contract. I feel bad for him, but my loyalties are to the pacers, so they come first to me, but on a purely human level I feel bad for him, I don't like to see people screw up, I don't get any joy out of it, no matter who it is

While he is approaching a tragic situation, the emotion I have for Stephen Jackson is probably closer to pity.

I'm going to save my true "feeling bad for" emotion for guys like Dujuan Wagner, Malik Sealy, Jay Williams, Bobby Hurley, Grant Hill, Len Bias, Reggie Lewis, Bobby Phills, Vin Baker and Rudy Tomjonavich. These guys were all a little less in control of their own tragic fates.

I'm not trying to say I get any joy out of what's happening to Jax (I admit some amusement, however) but it's more of a Mike Tyson/Nate Newton/Rae Carruth problem he's got himself into. Unfortunate for sure, but not altogether unpreventable.

Robertmto
10-13-2006, 01:17 AM
I do feel sorry for him. But he has not learned from his way of doing things.
What he needs is a heart transplant, and I am speaking on a spiritual level
and I believe there is only one person who can do that for him.

owl

JO?

Peck
10-13-2006, 01:59 AM
I absolutely feel very bad for Jackson right now.

Think about it, a split second stupid mistake may very well

A. Take away his freedom (ie. Jail time)

B. Take away his livelyhood. If the Pacers can void his contract then Jackson will not be able to earn what he is right now because he is a parriah around the NBA at the moment.

So, yes on a human level I feel sorry for him.

However in keeping with Hicks theme I'm not 100% sure it is reaping what he sowed but I am pretty convinced that his problems stem from the fact that he was to concerned with "keeping it real" or as a former poster used to say "keeping it hood".

There is nothing wrong with remembering where you came from & there is absolutely nothing wrong with giving back to your area.

But you must elevate yourself out of that situation. You must run your life & not let ghosts of where you come from run you.

It's not selling out or whatever it's called these days. It's simply growing as a person & trying to not be a member of the blood anymore.

Am I the only person who cringed when they read that Jackson was wearing a big red shirt & a red bandana?

Robertmto
10-13-2006, 02:03 AM
Am I the only person who cringed when they read that Jackson was wearing a big red shirt & a red bandana?

Where did you read that at?

Naptown_Seth
10-13-2006, 02:11 AM
I feel bad for him in a Darryl Strawberry kind of way.
Me too. Looks like he might have F'd up a good thing. I have no doubt that he'll look back at this with huge regret.

And yet who knows if he won't make a similar mistake 2 years from now, either here or elsewhere.



Where did you read that at?
Basically all the police testimony. The Star has the PDF of the official police report and even the 911 caller mentions him wearing red and white.

I strongly agree with Peck across the board.

I absolutely feel very bad for Jackson right now.

Think about it, a split second stupid mistake may very well

A. Take away his freedom (ie. Jail time)

B. Take away his livelyhood. If the Pacers can void his contract then Jackson will not be able to earn what he is right now because he is a parriah around the NBA at the moment.

So, yes on a human level I feel sorry for him.

However in keeping with Hicks theme I'm not 100% sure it is reaping what he sowed but I am pretty convinced that his problems stem from the fact that he was to concerned with "keeping it real" or as a former poster used to say "keeping it hood".

There is nothing wrong with remembering where you came from & there is absolutely nothing wrong with giving back to your area.

But you must elevate yourself out of that situation. You must run your life & not let ghosts of where you come from run you.

It's not selling out or whatever it's called these days. It's simply growing as a person & trying to not be a member of the blood anymore.

Am I the only person who cringed when they read that Jackson was wearing a big red shirt & a red bandana?


And while we are at it and listening to some people thinking Jack needs to have all this taken away from him, let's recall when Ray Lewis helped a double MURDERER escape the scene of the crime in his limo (after the guy(s) had stabbed 2 men in a nightclub fight). Lewis continues to get paid big money and gets to be a star, but clearly he put himself in exactly the same type of situation and easily could have ended up worse off than he was. In fact that was 4 am and the club had just been the scene of a FATAL shooting just 2 weeks prior. But I bet a LOT of Colts fans would love to have Ray Lewis playing in Indy right now, despite the obstruction of justice conviction.

So luck is a factor too. And as for reap what you sow, take a look at Jack's path to the NBA vs most players, not exactly easy street handed to him on a platter. He's the epitome of a self-made player, a guy that never quit and played wherever he had to in order to make the league. He sowed a lot of hard work and strength in the face of adversity too, much much more than the negative he sowed with 1 punch (DET), 1 kick and a couple of shots in the air.

He's a guy that brought his success on easily as much as he's brought on his downfall. And that makes me pity his situation that much more, it's a shame he didn't respect his own hard work a little bit more.

Robertmto
10-13-2006, 02:13 AM
So not only di dhe go to a bad area at a bad time of night but he ALSO wore gang colors in a gang troubled area?

:hmm:

jjbjjbjjb
10-13-2006, 02:35 AM
Yeah Jack needs to realize he is not a person and should not make mistakes.

People get to the top in large part by avoiding mistakes. Jack, as pointed out by many others, doesn't have the wack Artest talent to balance out his proclivity for making more and worse mistakes than others at the top.

SycamoreKen
10-13-2006, 02:42 AM
I feel bad for Jackson as well. I do hope that he learns something from this, but after hearing today that he was wondering why he was told not to go to practice, I'm thinking he still has some learning to do.

RWB
10-13-2006, 07:44 AM
Overall I feel bad for him, yes he deserves a lot of this, but he's had some bad luck and just as a person I feel bad for him.

Remeber this poll.........31 - 8 say it's not bad luck but bad choices. ;)

http://www.pacersdigest.com/forums/showthread.php?t=24872

RWB
10-13-2006, 08:01 AM
Call me a hater, but how old do you have to be before you make better decisions? Jack is 28 folks and making a great living. He no longer has to face the legitimate tough choices he did while growing up.

I feel sorry for anyone standing outside that club wondering if they were going to be shot by some nut firing away.

Harddrive7
10-13-2006, 08:21 AM
The crazy thing is 1 week ago right now, Jackson was considering whether he should go out or not, he decided to and look what happened. Overall I feel bad for him, yes he deserves a lot of this, but he's had some bad luck and just as a person I feel bad for him.


I wouldn't say that when you bring things on yourself that has anything to do with "luck"

Bad luck is like breaking a bone, or finding out that your wife is cheating on you, or someone drank the last Blue Moon. That's bad luck.

Running up into the stands and clobbering someone or firing your gun and being a willing participant of another fight...That really doesn't have much to do with "bad luck" IMO.

DisplacedKnick
10-13-2006, 08:32 AM
I feel sort of sorry for him. But the main reason is, from watching TV footage of his expression before and after court yesterday, it seems that he honestly doesn't understand how all this happened to him.

IOW - chances are good that something similar may happen to him again.

I've seen it often enough before. "I beat on her because she disrespected me - she made me do it." or "My kid wouldn't listen after I hit him with a belt so I used a pipe."

I feel sorry for him because he doesn't get it - not because of his legal problems. Maybe he can get some counseling where he does get it. But it's not like some cloud of doom descended and forced him either to go where he went that night, or do what he did in the parking lot. He chose his own actions - and doesn't seem to understand that there was a more appropriate course of action than going to his car, getting a gun, kicking some punk lying on the ground and firing into the air.

I wish I had more faith that he'd figure it out, but I don't.

Slick Pinkham
10-13-2006, 08:40 AM
I feel really bad that the Pacers are obligated to pay 28 million dollars over 4 years to someone who consciously chooses to do bad things, and as a result he has to face the entirely predictable consequences with all the accompanying bad publicity for the team.

I'm not aware of any accidents or bad luck involved.

BlueNGold
10-13-2006, 09:13 AM
I mainly feel bad for the loyal fans. Jack AND the franchise have made voluntary mistakes that have led to this. It might be painful, but it is not the end of the world for either one.

At the very worst, Jack spends a little time in the lockup. He will likely not be banned from the NBA for life...and even if he was, he is set financially for the rest of his life, unlike most people on this board. I have a difficult time feeling sorry for someone who makes millions doing something I like to do in my free time. Maybe this is an opportunity for him to finally grow up and face some of the cold hard facts of life.

The franchise has made its mistakes and is now paying for it. They should have listened to the majority of fans who have wanted Jack gone. He was certainly tradeable this summer and they failed on that one. I think the franchise finally hit bottom with this incident and it will recover. They will recover nicely if they can void Jack's contract or trade him for more than a bag of chips.

Knucklehead Warrior
10-13-2006, 09:35 AM
Feel sorry for him? :rolleyes:
No this is what happens when adults don't mature and don't take responsibility for their actions.
Is it a sad state of affairs? Sure. If you choose to live your life making stupid choices, taking irresponsible actions, and not acting like a grown up even if you look like one, then there are consequences. What's not to get?

We live in a world where there has to be some effort to get along. There is tolerance for nonconformity, immaturity, even for soft criminal activity, but it's a fine line to cross over and Jax2 has finally done it. That's why it's a sad situation. On one side of that line, he's just an adorable (to some people) knucklehead we mostly tolerate. On the other, he's lapsed into criminal activity. It's as if he didn't really do that much more, but he's now getting nuked for it. Think of the straw that broke the camel's back.

He built this hi-rise crapper by himself one brick at a time. Now he's gotta live in it. Sorry, I don't feel sorry for him. As my mother would say, "Let this be a lesson to you."

ChicagoJ
10-13-2006, 09:41 AM
What's the old saying,

"Luck is when preperation meets opportunity?"

Putting himself in that position - a violation of team rules according to DW - was the "preperation", and it appears from the police reports that he chose to disregard the "opportunity" to get out of there safely, without injury and without escalating the matter.

Its really hard to differentiate between bad choices and bad luck here. He obviously didn't say, "where can I go to get in a street fight and (allegedly) commit a felony?". So he's "unlucky" in that regard. But that's exactly what his choiced led to.

In fact, right now I think he was actually very lucky that for almost a week we only heard one side of the story and that - at least temporarily - bought him some sympathy from the fans. Of course, we now understand the "SJax was just an innocent victim" story was largely a fabrication.

I got the impression from his apology that he really does understand the link between his bad choices and the outcome. So I guess I feel bad for him knowing that there are probably some severe outcomes in his future and certain parts of the evidence don't look good right now. I feel bad for him to the extent he wishes he could go back and change how his actions/ decisions that night.

After all, haven't we all been there (regret) at some time or another?

But there are consequences.

Unclebuck
10-13-2006, 09:45 AM
I said he's had some bad luck.

RamBo_Lamar
10-13-2006, 09:46 AM
Yeah Jack needs to realize he is not a person and should not make mistakes.


What Jack really needs to realize, is that from this point onward, if any
kind of trouble occurs, he would be wise to not stupidly go jumping into
the middle of it, or exacerbating the situation in any way, shape, or form.

He needs to just go the other way, get the hell out of there, run if he
has to.

Nobody will think the less of you Jack if you run the other way. Nobody
will think you are a punk. You don't need to prove that you're badder
than anybody. Everyone will think much higher of you Jack if you
just get the hell out of there. That would be the right decision.

BlueNGold
10-13-2006, 10:01 AM
What's the old saying,

"Luck is when preperation meets opportunity?"


Even Jack said he is lucky to be alive. He could have gone under the car, not over it. He could have been shot by Fingers or Dino. IMO, Jack is also lucky because he is a multi-millionaire with great physical health. I consider much of this to be luck, not bad luck.

Of course, I would consider that the man was unlucky when God made his brain. I mean no offense by this. His downfall has come entirely due to his own preparation/choices which are driven by his intellect or lack thereof.

RWB
10-13-2006, 10:09 AM
His downfall has come entirely due to his own preparation/choices which are driven by his intellect or lack thereof.

I disagree that Jack has a lack of intellect BNG. Rather, Jack has the me me me syndrome. Everything is about satisfying Jacks wants much like Ron. If Jack wasn't selfish and thought of the team he wouldn't have made this mistake. It was more important for Jack to have fun at 3am. It was more important Jack kick this bad guy to show he was tuff and not taking no crap. Jack would hate for the crowd to think he was a coward or something. It was more important that Jack crack off a few rounds to show he was in charge. Jack likes to splash around in the pool to be seen apprarently. Jack has changed his mind now and doesn't want the attention now that there are consequences.

ChicagoJ
10-13-2006, 10:17 AM
Of course, I would consider that the man was unlucky when God made his brain. I mean no offense by this. His downfall has come entirely due to his own preparation/choices which are driven by his intellect or lack thereof.

We've seen on the basketball court that he's got an absurdly low bball IQ.

We know he didn't qualify for college - but goodness gracious I doubt that many kids from Port Arthur qualify for college.

He's not "smart". But I have no idea if he's "dumb", "stupid", or both. He could be "average" in terms of intellect.

I have no idea if he's got a low IQ, EQ, or both.

I tend to think, and this would be consistent with RWB's comment, that his EQ is the part that's really low. I'm not convinced its an "intellect" problem. And I think there's more to a low EQ than just "immaturity".

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emotional_intelligence

owl
10-13-2006, 10:35 AM
Consequences. We all deal with them when we make bad decisions.
Jax needs to feel some consequences for what he has done.

Roy Munson
10-13-2006, 11:06 AM
As others have said, the only bit of "feeling sorry" emotion I have in me about Jackson is that I sort of pity him for being so danged stupid that he doesn't know how to act in a civilized society.

And I think it takes a very high degree of stupidity not to know how to avoid problems, especially when you have the advantage of being a multi-multi-multi-millionaire. He was given great gifts with his life, but he chose not to listen to people who advised him on how to act and behave, so he may have squandered his gifts, or at least he is on his way to squandering his gifts. My hunch is that he'll still be an NBA player, at some point he'll make ridiculous amounts of money again, and hopefully he'll have a little better idea about how to handle it.

I'm not sure he will handle it correctly though, because it still boils down to the fact that he has to be smart enough to handle his life correctly, and I think he is a very very stupid human being when it comes to knowing how to function in our society.

Doug
10-13-2006, 11:26 AM
Regardless of whether it was his fault or not, for being there or for making the situation worse or whatever his actions were...

We should all feel compassion for him.

His career is in danger. He is looking at jail time. He has hurt people who care about him and hurt something (the Pacers) that people care about and I do believe he feels sorry for that. And he seems somewhat bewildered and confused by it all.

Again, even if he is in this situtation by his own actions, he is still human and worthy of our compassion.

Evan_The_Dude
10-13-2006, 11:35 AM
I feel bad for him because after hearing and reading about the story from both sides, I really think Jack is innocent, even if he did change his story a couple of times. Jack's story is simply much more believable than the Fingers crew. I think Jack truely came back motivated to change and show the fans that he isn't a bad guy and that he can be a key player for the Pacers. One bad decision changed that. I don't even think it was that bad of a decision because he'd look just as bad if he was at a strip club at 11pm and the same thing happened. I think it was a stroke of bad luck.

DisplacedKnick
10-13-2006, 12:08 PM
I feel bad for him because after hearing and reading about the story from both sides, I really think Jack is innocent, even if he did change his story a couple of times. Jack's story is simply much more believable than the Fingers crew.

Jack's story is that there was some shouting going on, he went to his car and came back with his gun. By the time he got back a fight had started and Fingers was on the ground. Then he kicked Fingers a few times and fired the gun in the air. Then he was walking back to his car and was hit by Dino's car.

This is what Jackson's statement said, according to the police report. By that statement, he committed a felony by discharging a firearm when he had no reason to fear for his safety.

The only substantial difference between Jackson's statement and Dino's and Fingers is whether Dino hit Jackson with his car in self-defense or not. And that doesn't have anything to do with the charges against Jackson, just the charges against them.

waxman
10-13-2006, 12:24 PM
The probability of "running into bad luck" increases greatly at 3:00 AM.

The guy couldn't even go a week after saying how he had an enlightened summer, how he was going to change everyones negative perceptions and that he's wants to be a leader in a more postive light.

I don't feel bad for him at all.

I feel bad for the rest of the team.....and... us.... again....Pacer fans got duped again.

dannyboy
10-13-2006, 12:31 PM
We've seen on the basketball court that he's got an absurdly low bball IQ.

We know he didn't qualify for college - but goodness gracious I doubt that many kids from Port Arthur qualify for college.

He's not "smart". But I have no idea if he's "dumb", "stupid", or both. He could be "average" in terms of intellect.

I have no idea if he's got a low IQ, EQ, or both.

I tend to think, and this would be consistent with RWB's comment, that his EQ is the part that's really low. I'm not convinced its an "intellect" problem. And I think there's more to a low EQ than just "immaturity".

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Emotional_intelligence

Hold up, where did that come from? What is your basis for this presumptuous statement? Please tell me you're not basing this on ONE MAN'S lack of judgment or perceived lack of intelligence.

Los Angeles
10-13-2006, 12:35 PM
FWIW - Nobody around LA wears colors anymore.

I think the reference to "Bloods" and "wearing red" need more meat on the bone. Otherwise, they are being made without merit.

ChicagoJ
10-13-2006, 12:40 PM
Hold up, where did that come from? What is your basis for this presumptuous statement? Please tell me you're not basing this on ONE MAN'S lack of judgment or perceived lack of intelligence.

You're right - I was trying to refer to the rough environment he grew up in, and I did a really poor job of describing it. I'm sure there are numerous "exceptions".

I'll quit while I'm behind on this one. My apologies.

gph
10-13-2006, 01:00 PM
FWIW - Nobody around LA wears colors anymore.

I think the reference to "Bloods" and "wearing red" need more meat on the bone. Otherwise, they are being made without merit.

Without merit? Jackson himself says that he wears blood colors and keeps a red bandana on him. There was a quote or two in the Michael Smith article that appeared on ESPN. If you are an insider, you can read it at

http://proxy.espn.go.com/nba/playoffs2005/columns/story?id=2062184

As for if he was wearing a bandana or shirt at the club, depends on what account you believe.

imawhat
10-13-2006, 01:02 PM
I would tend to believe he was, unless Fingers/Dino read that article or it was common knowledge about Jax and his ties with the Bloods.

gph
10-13-2006, 01:05 PM
I would tend to believe he was, unless Fingers/Dino read that article or it was common knowledge about Jax and his ties with the Bloods.


The first mention of him wearing red is actually from the club rio DJ, scott collier. But yeah, who knows who read the article, or what they assumed.

FSU-IU
10-13-2006, 01:10 PM
Without merit? Jackson himself says that he wears blood colors and keeps a red bandana on him. There was a quote or two in the Michael Smith article that appeared on ESPN. If you are an insider, you can read it at

http://proxy.espn.go.com/nba/playoffs2005/columns/story?id=2062184

As for if he was wearing a bandana or shirt at the club, depends on what account you believe.

I missed this article (and am not an insider). Can someone please post the article?

Thanks in advance,
FSU-IU

dannyboy
10-13-2006, 01:11 PM
You're right - I was trying to refer to the rough environment he grew up in, and I did a really poor job of describing it. I'm sure there are numerous "exceptions".

I'll quit while I'm behind on this one. My apologies.

Understood. It's just that I know lots of people, some of which are family members, from PA that are college grads. Of course, I also happen to know several that are not and probably never will be.

Thanks for clarifying.

Los Angeles
10-13-2006, 01:26 PM
Without merit? Jackson himself says that he wears blood colors and keeps a red bandana on him. There was a quote or two in the Michael Smith article that appeared on ESPN. If you are an insider, you can read it at

http://proxy.espn.go.com/nba/playoffs2005/columns/story?id=2062184

As for if he was wearing a bandana or shirt at the club, depends on what account you believe.

Could you copy and paste that article?

Pretty please? :pray:

ChicagoJ
10-13-2006, 02:30 PM
We've got that article in our archives.

Search on Jackson Bloods bandana and you should find it.

Slick Pinkham
10-13-2006, 02:34 PM
Jackson humbled by early life, suspensionBy Michael Smith
ESPN.com


INDIANAPOLIS – Like many other athletes-turned-entrepreneurs, Stephen Jackson has a record label, legitimized by the iced-out, nearly waist-length chain his boy from back home rocked the other night. The label's name is Secret Society Entertainment.


But when it comes to discussing his background, Jackson is anything but secretive. And based on what the Indiana Pacers' fiery guard/forward said in an empty Conseco Fieldhouse locker room after his team's Game 4 loss to the Pistons, it's doubtful that he and his artists are having difficulty finding material for hard-core rap albums. Jackson's upbringing was wrought with explicit content.



Stephen Jackson has found refuge in the NBA.
"I don't want to go back to where I came from," he says.


Port Arthur, Texas, that is. Jackson breaks it down like this: "50,000 people, eight sets of projects, two high schools. Everybody's doing the same thing."


Where he's from is why Jackson's temper on the court tends to bring out both the best and worst in him. It's why the Pacers' leading postseason scorer (17.4 points per game) plays like he – excuse the country grammar – ain't never scared.


Because that's precisely what Jackson is. Scared. Frightened of losing this, of "fading to black," of being another B.J. Tyler, the former University of Texas star who was gone from the NBA just as quickly as he got there. Tyler was from Galveston, Texas, not far from Port Arthur. "He got out, but he wasn't humble about it," Jackson says.


See, when you escape from what had Jackson and Tyler trapped, you do your damnedest to stay out. That's why Jackson has persevered through professional stops in Australia, the Dominican Republic, France and Venezuela, and with nine teams in the CBA and NBA before finding some stability four years ago with the Spurs (for two seasons).


For it was just 10 years ago that Jackson did his best to, as the rapper I-20 says, give new meaning to the word "childhood."


Point blank: Jackson was a hustler. You don't have to ask him about it. He'll tell you.


"I was out there bad, yo," the 27-year-old says, both disbelief and regret transparent in his voice.


He says he routinely skipped class as a high school sophomore and junior, preferring project hallways to those of Lincoln High. He says there were nights he didn't return home, that his single mother, Judy Jackson, had to go out searching for him. Stephen Jackson ignored a warning sign right in front him – his father, George Aldridge, just recently released after serving 10 years in prison for "robbery, drugs, all kinds of stuff," his son says.


"I'd be lying to you if I told you I didn't take that route. "Everybody's selling drugs and everybody's hanging out," says Jackson, who said his older brother, Donald Buckner, was beaten to death when Jackson was 15. About that time, until he left for prep powerhouse Oak Hill Academy in Virginia, where he would become a McDonald's All-American, Jackson found the allure of breaking the law too much to ignore, as Jay-Z once rhymed.


Jackson: "It was a fad. I damn sure wasn't thinking about getting no job. I thought that was the easy way out." He says he sold "a little bit of everything."


He keeps a red bandanna hanging outside his locker.


"You know what that is," he says.


Bloods. When he wasn't running hoops, Jackson used to run with the local street gang. He says he represented the "3200 Block, Three-two-double-oh." On the inside of his left forearm, he has a tattoo of a man firing an automatic weapon. He makes it clear he doesn't "bang" anymore (he is, after all, a father of five), but he still represents his roots, only in a different fashion, emphasis on fashion. A shirt with a red collar, a red Pacers cap.


"I was just raised like that," he says. "All my friends. I don't trip on nobody with no blue rag, but at the same time, it's what I represent. It's what I've represented since I was 9 years old. All my friends in my neighborhood. It was just inherited. I ain't banging, though.


"I got in a couple of scruffs over it," he recalls. "It's nothing I'm embarrassed about. It just happened growing up. Walking outside, everybody got on red, I can't walk outside in blue."


Others recognized his athletic talent – and the opportunity it presented – even when he couldn't. Older cats would give him two or three bills and send him home, he says. "Everybody knew I played basketball," Jackson says. "Sometimes I got pulled over with [drugs], and they let me go because of who I was. If I was in Houston or L.A., that would have been the end of me.


"That's why I always go back to I'm blessed. A lot of people get in that and don't have nobody to tell them, 'This ain't right.' There's a lot of people in my neighborhood that's probably 10 times better than me, but they didn't have people telling them, 'Yo, you need to stop that [stuff]. You can do it. But it's on you.'


"I had my grandmother, my aunts, my mom, telling me, 'What are you doing? That's not you.' And it wasn't me."


But it most certainly was Jackson we saw follow teammate Ron Artest into the stands at the Palace of Auburn Hills and engage in wild fisticuffs with fans, acting as though he'd been listening to hours of Lil Jon records.


It was him, and it wasn't.


One man's opinion drawn from limited exposure: Jackson is articulate, easygoing, smart and thoughtful. Charming even. Dude's cool. He often makes references to his deep religious faith. He doesn't come across as the thug he's perceived to be.


Then why'd he do it, you ask? He lives by a certain code of conduct, and on the night of Nov. 19, he wasn't about to compromise it. He was going to ride for Ron, Reggie – whoever was wearing a Pacers uniform.


"I regret hitting the fan, but I don't regret helping my teammate," he says. "I regret the world seeing me do that, I regret that happening at an NBA game, but I never regret helping my teammates. If Ron went in the stands again, I probably would go. I probably wouldn't hit a fan. I probably would go get him up out of there. Everything just happened so fast.


"There's no way I would have went in the stands if my teammate wouldn't have went in there. I was raised that if I'm with you and we get in a fight, I'm going to help you. We're going down together. That's how it goes. These guys in here are like my family. If we go to Detroit, Toronto, if we're going together, we have to make sure we come back together."


Jackson's actions cost him 30 games. During the time off – on road trips, spent in hotel rooms watching his teammates battle without him – he gained valuable perspective. Jackson had been paid in full when the Pacers acquired him from Atlanta in exchange for Al Harrington last summer, to the tune of a reported $38 million over six years. He says he had begun to lose the humility and the hunger that saw him through a four-year basketball odyssey that began when a poor academic record prevented him from playing at Arizona.


"It opened my eyes," he says. "I was real relaxed coming here. I was like, 'I made it.' That let me know anything can happen.


"With [Artest] asking for time off to promote the album and all that stuff, he got ungrateful. And I'll be the first to say that. Anytime you want to take time off from a job that millions of brothers work so hard to get here, that's not being humble. I think God showed him, 'The same way you got this, I can take this from you.' You can't take nothing for granted, and I think that's what [Artest] did. He got too happy with where he was, and God wakes you up all the time.


"Being away from the game showed me that, 'Look, you can be a badass all you want, but you've got to obey the rules.' God chose me for a reason. My momma tells me that every day. I know there's a million people who want to be in my shoes."


Somewhat scary is the thought of where Indiana would be without Jackson and his versatility. He has had to fill a different role than was intended when he arrived. With Artest gone, an aging Reggie Miller providing inconsistent contributions in the playoffs and Jermaine O'Neal struggling with a shoulder injury, the Pacers are looking to Jackson as their primary scorer, though his tendency to freelance doesn't always sit well with teammates ("We've still got a lot to learn about each other"). He possesses Miller's mentality in that he won't hesitate to pull the trigger. A natural shooting guard at 6-8, defensively he's asked to guard small forwards: (Tayshaun Prince in this series, Paul Pierce in the last).


All good, though. Jackson's approach to basketball is not unlike the way he once lived his life: He's down for whatever if winning comes at the end.


"A lot of people get here, and they're in it for the wrong reasons," Jackson says. "They're in it to be famous, to be on TV. I want to win. I had a taste of a championship in San Antonio, and that was big for me. I cried when we won, and I hadn't cried in 10 years before that. It felt good, everything I'd been through, to say I was the champion at the end of the year.


"I want to feel that again."


Michael Smith is a senior writer for ESPN.com.

ChicagoJ
10-13-2006, 02:36 PM
http://www.pacersdigest.com/forums/showthread.php?t=11968

Los Angeles
10-13-2006, 02:37 PM
http://www.pacersdigest.com/forums/showthread.php?t=11968&highlight=Jackson+Bloods

So Jackson DOES wear red to signify his upbringing in the bloods.

Good riddance, Jack.

ABADays
10-13-2006, 02:46 PM
I feel sort of sorry for him. But the main reason is, from watching TV footage of his expression before and after court yesterday, it seems that he honestly doesn't understand how all this happened to him.

This is a great statement and one that supports my theory on Jackson. He has that look because his actions were "normal" to him. It is the way he operates. Yes, he did come through the basketball ranks the hard way. But was any of this "hard way" precipitated by the kind of person and player he was?

No . . . as another poster said - he built this brick by brick. I feel sorry for the organization and the fans - not Jackson. I can maybe go along with pity.

gph
10-13-2006, 02:55 PM
http://www.pacersdigest.com/forums/showthread.php?t=11968&highlight=Jackson+Bloods

So Jackson DOES wear red to signify his upbringing in the bloods.

Good riddance, Jack.

yep...

the direct part, with the quotes being jack talking:

He keeps a red bandanna hanging outside his locker.


"You know what that is," he says.


Bloods. When he wasn't running hoops, Jackson used to run with the local street gang. He says he represented the "3200 Block, Three-two-double-oh." On the inside of his left forearm, he has a tattoo of a man firing an automatic weapon. He makes it clear he doesn't "bang" anymore (he is, after all, a father of five), but he still represents his roots, only in a different fashion, emphasis on fashion. A shirt with a red collar, a red Pacers cap.


"I was just raised like that," he says. "All my friends. I don't trip on nobody with no blue rag, but at the same time, it's what I represent. It's what I've represented since I was 9 years old. All my friends in my neighborhood. It was just inherited. I ain't banging, though.


"I got in a couple of scruffs over it," he recalls. "It's nothing I'm embarrassed about. It just happened growing up. Walking outside, everybody got on red, I can't walk outside in blue."

JayRedd
10-13-2006, 03:05 PM
"I was just raised like that," he says. "All my friends. I don't trip on nobody with no blue rag, but at the same time, it's what I represent. It's what I've represented since I was 9 years old. All my friends in my neighborhood. It was just inherited. I ain't banging, though.


Sounds like what a lot of Pacer fans are probably saying right now.

"I was just raised like that. I don't trip on nobody in a Knicks jersey, but the Pacers are what I've represented since I was 9 years oll. All my friends in my neighborhood. It was inherited. I aint cheering for them anymore though."