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Netweeny
06-16-2006, 09:12 PM
Maybe my history is screwed up, but didn't Boston draft Larry Bird a year early and have to wait out his final year of college? As such is there now a rule that prohibits a team from drafting someone and just waiting for him to finish his college stint?

I think you know where this is going? What would stop a team from just drafting Oden and just wait a year for him? I'm not hip to all the current rules, and I was just wondering if there is a rule against something like that.

Thanks.

Unclebuck
06-16-2006, 10:12 PM
Maybe my history is screwed up, but didn't Boston draft Larry Bird a year early and have to wait out his final year of college? As such is there now a rule that prohibits a team from drafting someone and just waiting for him to finish his college stint?

I think you know where this is going? What would stop a team from just drafting Oden and just wait a year for him? I'm not hip to all the current rules, and I was just wondering if there is a rule against something like that.

Thanks.


Yes Boston did do that and no you can't do that anymore. Otherwise the Cavs might have drafted Lebron the night he was conceived

Anthem
06-16-2006, 10:21 PM
Yup, the rules have changed. It don't work that way any more. If you put in for the draft, you lose your ability to play college ball.

Slick Pinkham
06-17-2006, 07:22 AM
Also, even in the past you could not draft underclassmen anyway. Bird was draft-eligible after 4 years in college, by the rules at the time. He had transferred from IU to ISU and sat out a redshirt year, so he had a 5th year of eligibility and you could draft any player 4 years after they had entered college.

The Pacers needed immediate help in the draft, so we went for Rick Robey instead of drafting Larry waiting a year to get him.

mboyle1313
06-17-2006, 03:24 PM
Anthem,

Not correct. If you declare for the draft, you can still return to semi-pro ball (AKA college) as long as you don't hire an agent. Many players go through the process of working out with NBA teams in May and June, then withdraw from the draft. This year, underclassmen who have declared have until Sunday to opt out of the draft

MJB

Anthem
06-17-2006, 04:52 PM
Anthem,

Not correct. If you declare for the draft, you can still return to semi-pro ball (AKA college) as long as you don't hire an agent. Many players go through the process of working out with NBA teams in May and June, then withdraw from the draft. This year, underclassmen who have declared have until Sunday to opt out of the draft

MJB
You're right, Mark. I misspoke. What I meant was that once you've actually been drafted, you're not able to return to college ball.

That's true, isn't it?

mboyle1313
06-17-2006, 11:16 PM
Anthem,

Yes. That rule changed a number of years ago. There was a time where you could declare for the draft as an underclassman, get drafted, and return to school if you hadn't hired an agent. Your rights would still belong to the team that drafted you, but in theory your bargaining position might improve if you had a breakout type season the next year.

I can't recall many players that exercised that option, though Voshon Lenard immediately comes to mind.

MJB

Slick Pinkham
06-19-2006, 08:13 PM
Andy Katz wrote a column before last years' draft discussing the eligibility rules. I think the Vashon Lenard situation (declared for the draft, was picked in the 2nd round, then decided to go back to Wisconsin) was made impossible by changing the rule in 2003 so that if a player is drafted, his eligibility is gone. If he doesn't like his draft position, that's too bad.

The only exception was that if a player declared for the draft straight out of high school and din't hire an agent, he could elect to play college ball even if he was drafted. That has now been almost closed by the 19-year-old rule.

Katz column:

http://proxy.espn.go.com/nba/draft2005/columns/story?id=2064108

Preps have it better in draft processBy Andy Katz
ESPN.com


We're here to clarify the NBA draft rules for underclassmen.

Every spring, information is released that is sometimes inaccurate or out of date. So, as soon as the early-entry list was published by the NBA, we went to the source – the NCAA – to get the updated rules for four-year college, junior college and high school players for the NBA draft process.

High school seniors have the most latitude. They can be drafted and go to school. The only hangup is the team owns their draft rights until a year after their college eligibility expires at the draft spot in which they were selected. So far, no one has exercised this since every high school senior who has been selected has renounced his eligibility by signing with an agent and trying the NBA.

Obviously, any player signing with an agent immediately becomes ineligible to return to school.

Without further ado …

12.2.4.2.1 Exception – Professional Basketball Draft – Four-Year College Student-Athlete
An enrolled student-athlete in the sport of basketball may enter a professional league's draft one time during his or her collegiate career without jeopardizing eligibility in that sport, provided the student-athlete is not drafted by any team in that league and the student-athlete declares his or her intention to resume intercollegiate participation within 30 days after the draft. The student-athlete's declaration of intent shall be in writing to the institution's director of athletics. (Adopted: 1/11/94, Revised: 1/10/95, 1/14/97 effective 4/16/97, 4/24/03 effective 8/1/03; for student-athletes entering a collegiate institution on or after 8/1/03)


ESPN.com translation: A four-year college player has one chance to test the NBA draft process and still go back to school, provided that player is not selected by an NBA team. It does not matter if that occurs because the player withdraws from the draft (by one week prior to the draft, per NBA rules) and is not available to be selected or if the player stays in the draft and goes unselected. The player must notify the school within 30 days after the draft to have his eligibility restored.


12.2.4.2.2 Exception – Professional Basketball Draft – Two-year College Prospective Student-Athlete
A prospective student-athlete enrolled at a two-year collegiate institution in the sport of basketball may enter a professional league's draft one time during his or her collegiate career without jeopardizing eligibility in that sport, provided the prospective student-athlete is not drafted by any team in that league. (Adopted: 4/24/03 effective 8/1/03; for student-athletes entering a collegiate institution on or after 8/1/03)


ESPN.com translation: JC players can declare one time and still go to a four-year school.


12.2.1.1 Tryout Before Enrollment
Prior to collegiate enrollment, a prospective student-athlete is permitted to try out for a professional team provided:
• The prospective student-athlete does not receive more than one expense-paid visit from each professional team;
• The prospective student-athlete tryout does not exceed 48 hours; and
• Any payment or compensation in connection with the visit was not in excess of actual and necessary expenses.


Note: A self-financed tryout may be for any length of time.


ESPN.com translation: High school seniors can get workouts paid for by NBA teams and technically can declare three times for the draft, as opposed to two for four-year college and junior college players.

A high school senior could test the process after his senior year and then again after his freshman or sophomore year before declaring for good as a junior. According to the NCAA, this means that a player like Washington's Brandon Roy could have declared as a junior and still retained his amateur status, since he originally declared as a high school senior. We incorrectly reported this a few weeks back.

This is good news for the high school seniors who declared this year if they want to test the draft process once they get to college, assuming they withdraw by June 21.


Tryouts: Post-enrollment
After an individual enrolls in college, the student-athlete may accept actual/necessary expenses from the NBA to participate in the NBA pre-draft camp. The student-athlete may try out with an NBA team during the summer or during the academic year (if not enrolled full-time), provided the student-athlete does not receive any form of expenses or other compensation from the team.

Please note there has been some confusion in the past few years with regards to the team providing actual/necessary expenses to a student-athlete. It is not permissible for the NBA team to initially pay for the expenses for the student-athlete with the condition the student-athlete would repay the NBA team after the tryout. Furthermore, the student-athlete may not try out with an NBA team during the academic year if enrolled full-time; unless the student-athlete has exhausted his eligibility.


ESPN.com Translation: Don't pull a Lawrence Roberts. Pay up front and you won't have to deal with the NCAA sitting you for a game or two or more if you return. Also, players can't go for tryouts until after school ends. That's why a player (like Stanford's Chris Hernandez) at a school on the quarter system can't try out until June.


Andy Katz is a senior writer for ESPN.com

ChicagoJ
06-19-2006, 08:56 PM
-snip-semi-pro ball (AKA college)

I've used this line for so long that I forgot where I originally stole it from. (But it was from this guy that used to host the Sports Daily on WNDE and did an excellent job hosting that program, even if he did make me listen to Sinatra snippets far too often.)

Thanks.