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Peck
03-26-2006, 09:25 PM
Since we are approaching Reggie's retirement date I thought it would be nice for to have a thread where everybody can talk about Reggie. It could be a favorite memory, a thought about Reggie, a wish for his future health, whatever. This is the place for you to let it out about Reggie Miller.

I'll go ahead & start.

This might be long or it might be short I don't know, we'll just have to see how it is when I'm done.

When I think about Reggie Miller now (after he has retired) I realize that I am like that old hair metal band Cinderella when they sang that song so long ago "Don't know what you've got till it's gone".

I will go ahead & fess up now. I was never a Reggie Miller fan when he was playing. Often times I felt embarrassed by the way he flopped on the court and I was often times offended by his need to trash talk the opponet after he hit a shot. More times than not I wanted to kill him when he would verbally abuse a referee because he often would draw a "T" after making a basket & drawing a foul. I caveat that by saying whenever he would verbally abuse Benet Savatore I was always with him 100%, but that is for another post.

I felt he relied on the three point shot to much, I was p!ssed beyond belief that he wouldn't rebound & there were times I'd pull my hair out of my head when he would pass up open shots later in his career so Jermaine could get a shot.

From his third contract on I thought he was over paid and I just knew that no other team would have given him a 2 mil dollar deal on his last contract let alone the 6 mil. we gave him.

Ok, here it is.

I was a fool. I was wrong.

Sometimes you just can't see the forrest for the tree's & that is about the only excuse I will try & offer up.

I watched him for so long & saw so many games with him that I did NOT properly appreciate him as a star.

That's right for those of you out there that were in this faction back on the star board here is your time to let me have it.

Because if I had to do it all over again I would gladly have joined in the group that listed Reggie's A Superstar. Or RAS for short.

I never appreciated the fact that Reggie Miller played the vast majority of the games he was eligable to play in. I never appreciated the fact that he came early & stayed late to every practice. I never appreciated the fact that he never was a distraction to the franchise. I never appreciated the fact that he was a spokesman for the City & the State of Indiana. I never appreciated that Reggie Miller was one of the greatest shooters to ever play the game. I never appreciated that other players considered Reggie a threat on the floor that opened up opprotunities for others. I never appreciated the fact that coach's often made entire defensive sets to limit Reggie's touches. I never appreciated that at the end of a game that the man could get off a shot even though every player, coach, ref & fan in the arena knew it would be him to get the ball. I never appriciated the fact that nobody ever worked harder on the court than Reggie.

At the end, I never appreciated the fact that for 18 years I was blessed to have watched one of the best basketball players to ever play the game. That feels funny saying that now, not because it feels odd today but because for so many years I lived in denial of that very fact. Reggie Miller is one of the top 50 players to have ever played the game.

I'd give any player we have on our team right now for Reggie Miller. I think when it's all said & done(and this is no offense to any of the other greats ie. Big Mac, Mel, Roger, etc.) I think I would give any player that has ever played for the Pacers to have have Reggie Miller back on the team now.

The more I read other players like Eddie Johnson, who has no real reason to lie, say that Reggie Miller was a pro's pro and the most unselfish superstar he had ever played for. The more I kick myself in the *** everyday. I should have just spent more years being a fan instead of wishing he was better.

Now don't get me wrong, it's not like I hated Reggie or anything. In fact I always sort of liked him, but he was never my favorite player on the team except for two times.

The second time he was my favorite player was after the 00 team was busted up. The fact that Reggie did not publicly thrash the Pacers management was a testament to his professionalism. His entire team was torn asunder after he signed an extension and he was left here as a draw to the fans. I won't lie, I litterally didn't care one way or the other for the 00/01 Indiana Pacers other than for Reggie. Since he was the only link to the past glory I kind of held onto him as my favorite Pacer.

However it's the first time that Reggie was my favorite player that I want to talk about now.

Jay, you will want to skip this part.

I've told this story before so some of you may just want to skip ahead as well, but since were doing this thread for posteritys sake I will retell it.

It was the 91/92 playoffs & for the second year in a row we were playing the Boston Celtics. The previous year we had played the Celtics tough & had taken them to 5 games & gave them everything they ever wanted and then some. A young Chuck Person was going tit for tat with a Larry Bird who was just starting to reach the downside of his career but still a force on the floor.

Chuck was vocal, animated & ultimately very good in that series. But hidden behind the great series that Chuck had was a a young Reggie Miller who had a good series himself, just not as animated.

However in the 91/92 series things were differant. We were swept out in three games & the team had no passion, fire or willpower. In fact the Celtics pretty much dominated us.

At the end of game three as we were applauding the team as the clock wound down and the buzzer rang. Players were shaking hands at half court & embracing.

This is when I saw two absolute opposites in action.

At the half court stood Chuck Person (again Jay do NOT read this) smiling, shaking hands & joking with the Celtics. I mean he was having a good old time. When I say he was joking with the Celtics I mean where I was sitting on the runway aisle I could hear him laughing & cutting up. BTW, Chuck had sucked in this series.

Then there under the basket I saw a lone figure, a man squated down on the floor with his head looking at the floor. Nobody was around this guy & he did not look happy. It was Reggie, who btw had played a good series.

Reggie stood up, walked to half court shook hands like a gentleman (there was no hugging or high fiving) and then walked down the hometeam ramp. There were a few of us left there that weren't wearing kelly green so we gave him a light round of applause then he stopped & pointed at us. Of course the ovations got louder at this point. He walked by & shook hands with some of the guys on the rail & then left the floor.

I knew there & then that Reggie was the type of player I would like, he hated to lose.

Of course Reggie stayed my favorite for a couple of years, then Dale Davis hit the scene but that is another post in the future.:)

However I want to share one last thing with you if you will endulge me.

I want to share with you my greatest Reggie Miller moment.

I've seen them all either on TV or live in person. I was as thrilled as anyone in the wolrd when he shoved off Jordan & nailed that three, I about died of a heart attack when he scored all of those points in the 4th quarter vs. the Knicks.

But none of that will compare to my favorite Reggie Miller moment & it wasn't even something he did on the floor.

It was 1994 and we were playing the Orlando Magic in the first round of the playoffs. We had won game one on the biggest shot ever made in franchise history by Byron Scott off of a Reggie assist & we had won game two as well.

Game three was winding down & MSA was litterally the madhouse on market street. For those of you to young to remember I feel sorry for you because this was pure magic (pardon the pun). The fans were chanting S-W-E-E-P over & over again because we were winning. It was loud & it was crazy in there.

As the final buzzer sounded the fans erupt, fireworks hit & confetti flew. Yes it was a little to much maybe,but our franchise had never been out of the first round at that point.

Anyway after all the on court celebrations & congratulations between the teams the fans were still there, still chanting.

The rest of the team was walking to the locker room but one player did not.

Reggie Miller ran to each corner of the floor & pointed out to every section of fans. He then proceeded to jump onto the scorers table and begins to high five as many fans as he could reach.

I know that this may sound hokey or hell even stupid but I felt like we all bonded with Reggie that night. That night I felt like Reggie was as much a fan of the fans as we were fans of him. Corny? Probably but unless you were there it's hard to explain the pure electircity in the air.

Anyway, I'll stop now though I will probably come back from time to time to add more stories.

Please guys, give us your feelings, story's, thoughts whatever.

Oh yea, one last thing. I just wanted to post one of my favorite pictures of three of my favorite players.

http://www.nba.com/media/pacers/reggie_career_gallery35.jpg

Anthem
03-26-2006, 09:35 PM
Peck, I have a feeling that that if you wrote a recipe book, I'd read it.

You've got a gift, man.

IUColtPacerFan
03-26-2006, 09:37 PM
Reggie Miller is the reason I love the Pacers. There is no better way of putting it. His tenure on the team made up most of my lifetime so I grew up watching him as the only constant on our perenially successful team that I believe helped put Indianapolis in the spotlight. The city owes a lot to him for being part of such an exciting and hopeful time. I remember being at a graduation ceremony during the 94 playoffs and everyone carrying walkmans to listen to the game rather than pay attention to the commencement. There are too many favorite moments to pick just one, but this definitely ranks among them...

http://cafe.chosun.com/img_file/club_file/69/dreaminkiza/bbs/8/Reggie_Miller2%5B20050406154059%5D.jpg

Lord Helmet
03-26-2006, 09:42 PM
Peck, man this makes me so sad. I'm a youngin' so I didn't get to see all of Reggie's magic, but I saw a lot, even though it was at the end of his career.

See, I wasn't really a diehard Pacer fan when they made the Finals, but I always liked Reggie and hoped the best for the Pacers. I became a diehard after the Finals, and each and every year since then I've followed them more and more close.

But, that's not what we're talking about right now, we're talking about Reggie moments, and I'll have to say one of the best moments for me was Game 1 of the ECF three years ago. We were playing the Pistons and remember this was the 61 win team. I remember Reggie hitting that three off of a Foster screen and the whole place went nuts, I mean it got really loud. I loved it. It was the only "true" Miller Moment I had witnessed live and it was sweet.

In fact, the whole playoff run of 03-04, I really enjoyed, as I have mentioned before.

It was just a good year and I think one of the reasons I liked it so much was because it was the first time we went deep in the playoffs since I had become diehard.

I remember the Miami series and watching on TV and being at Game 5, I think it was and hearing the cars honk their horns.....ahhh....:cool:

That's really all I can think of now. But I'll post more if I think of more. I just miss Reggie so much....

Roaming Gnome
03-26-2006, 09:45 PM
Peck, that was very deep. I truly loved that.

NaptownBound
03-26-2006, 09:46 PM
Peck... thank you.

I just read your whole post and I was cool.. until the end when you started talking about the sweep over Orlando in '94... now i'm crying.

I was at the game. I was 13 years old, but being the historian that I am... even at the young age, I knew that the Pacers had never done much of anything in the NBA. I wasn't even thought of back in the ABA days. My mom and dad were teenagers then.

My dad was determined to be at that game. I know he spent a pretty penny for those tickets on the street. So we got in... and I remember every single thing about that night. Going up to the rafters and watching our Pacers make history. It was the last game my dad and I went to together. Not too long after that, my dad and mom broke up and I barely saw him again until I graduated from college three years ago. A year and half after that he passed away.

Dad would always praise the Pacers... especially Reggie. He loved how Reggie cared about the game, cared about the city, and wanted to be a competitor. I've been a Reggie Miller fan since I was 9 years old and had my haircut just like him... with the ramp.

http://www.nba.com/media/pacers/reggie_career_gallery8.jpg

I'm not going to write a long entry... at least not right now because I need to collect my thoughts. But Reggie will always be my favorite player. From now until eternity.

SoupIsGood
03-26-2006, 09:47 PM
Peck, man this makes me so sad. I'm a youngin' so I didn't get to see all of Reggie's magic, but I saw a lot, even though it was at the end of his career.

See, I wasn't really a diehard Pacer fan when they made the Finals, but I always liked Reggie and hoped the best for the Pacers. I became a diehard after the Finals, and each and every year since then I've followed them more and more close.



Same here.

I saw some awesome Reg moments, but I'll never forget him an Dale teaming up, playing 20 years below their actual age, an carrying us to th playoffs last year. Just amazing.

Hicks
03-26-2006, 09:48 PM
Good thread. I'll have to add to this later.

8.9_seconds
03-26-2006, 10:12 PM
Peck, thank you, that was awesome.


Reggie Miller has had one of the greatest influences of anybody in my life. It may sound stupid to have one of your most admired influences be somebody you've never met, but he truly is. Ever since I was four years old I've been a Pacers fan, and a die hard Reggie Fan. I'm not ashamed to say the reason I'm a fan today is this man, nor am I embarrased to say I am the person I am today because of him.

I would never hold as much hope in things as I do if it weren't for him. I wouldn't be able to take as many knocks as I have without thinking about what he's been through. I am an athlete because of Reggie. I remember every night after the playoff games in the summer when I was about 10 I would go outside and imulate everything Reggie had done just hours before. Honestly, I'm not sure if I would believe in Miracles if it weren't for #31. Really, even if you don't like him, you can't deny what he's done miraculous.
Reggie has taken the team upon his shoulders more than once, damn he became a franchise.

I don't think I'll ever forgive myself for never seeing him play in person, it will be one of my,if my only, regret. It sounds stupid, but I keep a picture of him in purse just in case I see him one day and I can get an autograph. I read articles,watch game clips, read posts like Peck's and just breakdown sometimes. I Love basketball, I love the Pacers, and I Love Reggie Miller. I wish I could give him something back for everything he's given me.


I know this is probably really corny, but I don't care, it's the truth.

18 seasons, year after year......

Jaydawg2270
03-26-2006, 10:30 PM
I wish i was old enough to have witness all of reggie's career, but i still got to see some of his greatest works and i thought the older he got the more amazing his shots were.

heywoode
03-26-2006, 10:34 PM
I've watched Pacers basketball for at least 18 years and the culmination of that for me is this Thursday night. There will be no greater Pacer moment in my lifetime, save a championship banner being hoisted. Even then, I'm not sure it will mean as much to me as seeing #31 go up.

Congratulations Reggie, you were, are, and always will be the face of the franchise as far as I'm concerned.

Believe_in_blue
03-26-2006, 10:51 PM
That was awesome Peck. My personal favoriate Reggie moment was game 5 of the first round of the 2000 playoffs. Sure it was the game Travis Best hit the three, but Reggie scored 40 that game and I will always remember that. It was my first playoff game at Conseco and Reggie was great. The reason that I chose that one was because that was the first time that I really felt a connection with Reggie. I was a pretty huge fan before that, but that game was the one that made me a fan for life.

Bball
03-26-2006, 10:59 PM
I'm wondering if Peck and NaptownBound's posts should be framed.

Very nice and moving.

-Bball

Unclebuck
03-26-2006, 11:58 PM
That was great Peck, I remember the 1994 playoffs better than any playoff run. The younger members of this forum cannot possibly understand what it felt like to finally win a playoff series. When I read posts from those of you under 25 years old complaining about how the Pacers have never won a championship. I just shake my head. I was 26 years old before the Pacers won a playoff series in my lifetime, a playoff series.

In fact for years and years they never made the playoffs. For years and years they never won 30 games. Most current Pacers fans have no idea what it's like to have 3500fans in the stands to watch the Pacers. The younger fans among us have no idea just how bad things were, just how close to leaving Indianapolis the Pacers franchise was. When the Pacers beat the Magic in 1994 I cried. Maybe partially I cried out of joy, but more than that it was a pride thing, I was so proud of the team and my emotions got the better of me. All those years of people making fun of me for being a Pacers fan, all those years of listening to Bob Lamey on my transistor radio when I was supposed to be sleeping, all those years of being sick and tired of the lovcal media ignoring or making fun of the Pacers, all of that seemed finally to be worth it.

What does this have to do with Reggie Miller? Well I strongly believe the team never would have won a playoff series in 1994 or in 1995 without Reggie Miller, Conseco never would have been built and Pacers would have left Indianapolis. Reggie saved the franchise, he rised the franchise to what it is today, Reggie did all that. Just think how many fans are Pacer fans today just because of Reggie Miller. He's the face of the franchise.

Years from now I'll be able to tell others about Reggie Miller and what he did and how he saved the franchise.

As far as an individual game, I always first think of game 5 in 1996. It was the deciding game against the Hawks at MSA and yes the Pacers lost. That was the year Reggie had the eye injury, he missed the first 4 games and came back for game 5, scored 29 points and almost lead the Pacers to victory in that deciding game. That game told us everything we needed to know about Reggie. His mental toughness was his greatest strength.

sweabs
03-27-2006, 12:29 AM
I'm a Canadian; was born and raised to play hockey. My Dad went on hockey scholarships as one of the best players in the province. He had me on the ice playing at the young age of 4. I remember sitting on the couch with him watching the Leafs each and every night as a kid on TV. So 15-20 years later, why the heck is my room covered in the blue and gold, with Pacers logos everywhere?

Reggie Miller.

I never bothered watching a minute of basketball before my first encounter with Reggie. I sucked at basketball. My friends and I only played hoops when road hockey, baseball, soccer, or football became out of the question (because of a shortage of players). It was obviously not high on the list of priorities, and I was fortunate for that because I sucked. The girl next door could beat me at a game of "bump". I had no interest in the sport whatsoever.

I was at my Grandma's house for the day. Consequently, I was left with maybe 4 or 5 channels to choose from on the TV. I forget all of the choices, but I remember that I really debated between watching the NBA Playoffs (Indiana VS New York) or Blossom. Blossom looked like a mighty fine choice at that time for a 10 year old kid with no interest in basketball, but it must have been a repeat or something...because I opted out to watch my first taste of NBA basketball and more importantly, Reggie Miller and the Indiana Pacers.

It was May 7, 1995. Reggie's infamous "8 points in 18 seconds". I remember developing a strong hatred for the Knicks during that game and their crowd. They just bothered me, and I was pulling for the "underdogs" on the road. Unfortunately, with 18 seconds left in the game it seemed as though there was no hope for Indiana. Oh well - I wasn't that attached to them at that point anyway...but at least I somewhat enjoyed a game of basketball. Little did I know that it was far from being over...

When Reggie pulled off what he did, I can not explain what I felt. I had never seen anything like that before. Remember, the only real sport I paid attention to up until that point was hockey...and I had witnessed nothing in hockey that was equal to what Reggie had just accomplished in a mere 18 seconds. From that point onward, Reggie represented the ultimate fighter in my eyes. He never gave up! He was the "True Warrior" for all I cared.

I realized that I had witnessed something special, and I felt as though I was a part of that Pacers win. They were my team from that point onward, and I owe that to Reggie Miller.

But Reggie was more than just a basketball player to me. He became a model figure in my life, while I was still probably just an "impressionable kid". He represented the underdog at it's fullest. As time went on, I started hearing more about his persistent work ethic, his silent leadership qualities, his professionalism, etc. All the intangibles that made Reggie such a great basketball player and person. Those were the things that I wanted to acquire...I wanted to be like Reggie. I could relate to him.

I played triple A soccer for most of my childhood at a high level, but was never seen as the fastest kid, or the most skilled player for that matter. But now when I reflect back upon it, it's amazing to see the impact that Reggie had. I'm serious - our soccer team was listed in the top 5 in Canada...we were good, and there were some real talented players on our team. I often felt as though I wasn't good enough for those guys...even though I was a starting defender. But I approached the game like Reggie.

If Reggie was such a great leader, then I would be too. I became the captain of our team, even though I was far from being the most skilled player on the field.

If Reggie worked his *** off, then so would I. I ran 10km three times a week as part of my weekly schedule on top of soccer practices/games/tournaments. I worked on conditioning and skills outside of practice time, and it made all the difference.

Hell, I even developed a little swagger like Reggie when I was feeling it.

You see - Reggie was not blessed with the physical gifts that guys like Lebron James have...nor was I blessed with the inherent skill to blow by my opponents or dic them out with fancy moves in soccer. So what I lacked in those areas, I would make up for in other ways. I think this is the most important thing that Reggie taught me, and it has lasted with me still to this day and will never be forgotten. I approach everything - whether it be sports, school, jobs, ANYTHING - with 110% effort and preparation. It has just become part of me, and I'm thankful that I had such a great role model as a kid to instill these qualities in me.

I think my favourite memory of Reggie Miller was the 2001 First round of playoffs against the Nets. He came to that game so mentally focussed and prepared, it's uncanny. I remember being so happy when he hit the long-range bomb from near half-court to send the game into OT screaming "He's still got it! He's still got it!" And then I remember being utterly surprised when he made that game-tying DUNK DOWN THE MIDDLE OF THE LANE to send the game into 2OT...wow. I was in disbelief that he could still get up like that after everything he had just gone through. But that was Reggie in the playoffs...that is what you could expect. He was just a notch above everyone else in playoffs. I think he gave Kevin Ollie an important shot down the stretch of the game (which ended up missing), and Reggie was man enough to take the blame upon himself...even after everything he did.

Man, I really miss that guy. But he'll never, EVER be forgotten because when people ask me "how on earth did you get into basketball and become an Indiana PACER fan at that", I can tell the story of Reggie Miller. To take things one step further, every time I go above and beyond on a given task, or become the designated leader for a project or team, or leave 110% on whatever assignment has been given......I can look back and thank Reggie. And that is why I know he will never be forgotten.

The Toxic Avenger
03-27-2006, 12:33 AM
Beautiful perfection. Great Thread and Great Posts.

My Favorite Moment would be my first Reggie Moment.

I was in Sixth Grade in 1998 and I didn't know Basketball worth anything because of my family. We were Baseball folk. I moved here to Indiana when I was five and really didn't get to know anyone since I lived kinda in the country away from any of my classmates. I became interested in Basketball on the playground so I played for my elementary in 5th and 6th and got to know a couple of guys fairly well.. Diamond Dave being one of them.

SO I began to watch the Pacers and the Bulls whenever I could because thats all the kids at school would talk about. Reggie this and Jordan that... Rodman vs. Dale Davis... that kind of thing.

Of course I had no idea what they were talking about so I just kinda smiled and nodded, chiming in with whatever I could, whenever I could, trying not to look like an uneducated fool.

So the ECF rolled around towards the end of the school year and I got hooked. I set aside my Sega Genesis and watched every game I could. It finally hit me why it was such a great sport to watch. After a few games I finally GOT what my classmates said about Jordan and Miller... It wasn't going just blank nods anymore it was a feeling... I GOT the Rivalry. I GOT the thrill. Well... when Reggie pushed off Mj and made that 3 it was like Robin Hood making his biggest donation to the poor. I LOVED it.

Loved it.

Anyway... Thats just me. Sports really are a life saver. So many things in MY life would be different with out Basketball... Not the least of which would be my friendship with Diamond Dave (EVEN though we WERE on competing teams :)). Knowing Peck personally has changed me... I'm one of his biggest fans and I respect him very much. They are BOTH there for me through the thick and thin and If the next Generation is HALF of what they are I'll be right there beside THEM as well.


Nolan

abington
03-27-2006, 12:43 AM
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
(im reprinting this from the reggie statue thread. i really liked what i wrote about 31.)

I have no problem with a statue.

I think the point that Scott and Mark Boyle and others are missing is that with Reggie, it is so much more than rings or his lack of them. Reggie had an intangible almost magical affect on all of us in Pacer nation. He made us happy to be Pacer fans and excited about following them. He made us a national team and gave the team and the city a face. He came of age as the downtown did. And his flair for the dramatic made him one of the more intriguing and exciting players in the HISTORY OF THE LEAGUE.

Almost more imporantantly, he captured the fans' love more than almost any player in any city in any sport. His charisma and relationship with the fans was the stuff of legends. His final year, and final months, and final run, and final game only added to that legend.

I don't think Donnie Walsh and certainly Larry Brown are even close to Reggie when you consider all the factors in play. Reggie was the Pacers. And the others, Mark and Rik and Detlef and Jalen and Jermaine and Ron had never, and will never, even with a ring, ever reach the level of popularity that 31 had.

He deserves it

NaptownBound
03-27-2006, 02:23 AM
Okay… you guess are going to have to indulge me for a second because this could be very, very long.

When Reggie came to the Pacers, I was seven years old. My dad would take me to a few games a year, when he could afford to. Some of the best memories of my childhood was watching the Pacers on channel 59 when Jerry Baker was calling the action… or listening to a younger Mark Boyle on the radio on those late night games out west… knowing darn well I was supposed to be asleep. Just like most people on this board, I bleed blue and gold. The Pacers mean so much to me. However, even at the young age, I could tell something wasn’t right. Other than not winning, there was no energy in MSA. There was a faithful following of Pacers fans, but very small. So small that the team had the curtains draped down in the upper deck to make the small crowd look larger. These were my first childhood memories, so everything is so vivid to me and it will be forever.

So, in Reggie’s first year, he became my favorite player. There was something about him that I could relate to. Maybe it was because I was skinny, scrawny black kid myself. I tried to pattern my game after him. I cut my hair like him. He’s who I wanted to be.

So came 1994… the playoffs. And after the last few years of playoff disappointment, I really felt good about us. When Byron Scott hit that shot in Game 1 against Orlando… I knew that everything had changed. Everything just felt differently. We actually won a Game 1! Then, I went to game 3 with my dad like I explained earlier… I remember everything about that night. How my dad got those tickets… the walk up to the rafters that seemed like it would never end… how loud MSA was that night… it was amazing. Reggie hit a clinching three and skipped down the court with his arms in the air and the whole place lost its collective mind.

Then came June 1, 1994… the point of no return.
25 points in the 4th quarter, literally willing the team to a improbably Game 5 win in the Garden. And of course, the chat with Spike only adding to the drama… crazy. The one point of that game I remember is when Reggie was about to take a screen from LaSalle Thompson, then just pulled up in John Starks’ face from 29 feet away and buried it. I call that the “eff you” shot. It was a collective “eff you” to the city of New York. I loved every bit of it.

Then came May 7, 1995… 8 points in 8.9 seconds
I remember watching this with my grandfather. I had all but given up and we just wanted it to end so the next game could come on. Then Reggie saved us again and called New York “a bunch of effin’ choke artists”. I just couldn’t believe it. I have this game on tape, and I pop it in sometimes and watch it and still can’t believe it happened.

Of course over the years Reggie had his chance to leave the city, but he stayed. He committed to making our Pacers a winner. He committed to our city, our region, our state. And really, more than game-winning threes, that’s what makes Reggie who he is. Making shots on a basketball court only put him in a position to be who he is to our community. From there, he took it upon himself to entrench himself with us. That’s what makes him so special to me and many other native Hoosiers. As Reggie grew, we grew. The bigger Reggie got, the better the Pacers got, the more attention our city got. Conseco is just the name on the building… we all know that’s Reggie’s building. I think the team should name the court after him, but that’s just me. Without Reggie, there would be no team. My dad told me about the fundraiser they had for the team back in the mid 70s to save the team. I actually saw the paltry crowds at MSA for myself. Reggie saved the team. Reggie revitalized the city. Reggie gave us hope. Reggie gave us a pulse. Reggie was, is, and will always be Indianapolis.

Last season was so tough for me after Reggie announced he was going to retire. At that point, I didn’t know if we were going to make the playoffs. So, I saved what little money I could and bought a ticket to the last game of the regular season, thinking it would be Reggie’s last game. Little did I know that he would revert his game back to the mid 90s for the rest of the year and actually lead the team to the playoffs. So when I went to the game, I cried. There I was, up in the rafters, knowing this would be the final time I would see him play in person. I cried when Reb Porter announced his name in the starting lineup. I cried during the post game ceremony. Then his last game, I’m sure I pissed off the neighbors with all my yelling. I didn’t care. I just didn’t want him to leave. It felt like a piece of me died that night. I cried for about an hour. I kept saying “I can’t believe he’s gone.”

It all seems so silly to be crying over a man I’ve never even met. However, it’s what the man symbolizes, that’s why I cry or smile every time I see him, hear him, or someone speaks about him. I’ll defend him and his legacy against any and every critic. He means so much to every Pacer fan. He means so much to the city of Indianapolis and the state of Indiana. Without him, our team wouldn’t be where it is today. Our city wouldn’t be where it is today.

The following is something I wrote last year, a couple days after Reggie’s last game:

http://www.sportscolumn.com/story/2005/5/24/9216/54773/nba/Miller_made_a_franchise

Thank you Reggie. 31 and only.

larry
03-27-2006, 03:14 AM
reggie is my favorite ever the man is a big part of indy being cool. i was young when the cat torched the knicks.in fact my 1st live game was when he hit a 3 on jordan in game 4 the only time it was pacers vs. bulls. my dad loves iu and saw smart connect in the n.o. in 87. but the iu of my life has been the pacers. i gotta rare reggie poster 2 my left as im typing this. i cried twice last year. i love reggie!

larry
03-27-2006, 03:17 AM
props 2 buck 4 being a day oner! i got my tix do u???

#31
03-27-2006, 03:49 AM
He is kinda my "Yoda" and im his "padawan", i play basketball to and have always watched tapes of Prime Reggie over and over to learn his moves. Why Reggie? Why not Jordan? Because Jordan is only someone you can only WISH to be when you are basketball player, Reggie was an inventor of finding ways to score without being Athletic or BIG.

Only by watching him you will learn how to get Open 24/7 for a Jumpshot, stuff like abusing screens, flopology (drawing fouls), shooting stroke, shooting accuracy, clutch situations, basketball mindset, tricks, the psychological warfare (to destroy your opponents rythm) and most importantly Work Ethics! etc. But from players like MJ you could only learn how to... dream about jumping over people?

Other than that, i feel like he is one of best SG´s in NBA History (right there behind MJ) to never Win a Championship ring. The best Pacer EVER and a huge part of Pacer franchise. Will miss you Reg! :(

xphoenix
03-27-2006, 03:57 AM
My top 3 Reggie moments that i think of almost every day.

1) 1994 Playoffs. I am in 5th grade and the Pacers are losing bad to the Knicks in the Playoffs. I said "Dad I am going to bed." I wake up for school the next morning and am in the bathroom washing my face. My dad pops in and says "Guess who scored 25 points in the 4th quarter last night?"

2) 1995 Playoffs. Everyone is pumped up.. Knicks V. Pacers again in the playoffs. Game 1, Pacers have all but lost the game, Bill Walton is going over reasons why the Pacers have lost. My dad has given up this time and goes out on the roof to finish painting the house. All of a sudden me and best friend are going crazy! 8 points in under 10 seconds by REGGIE!! My dad almost falls off the roof because he hears me and friend going crazy and Slick yelling BOOOOOM BABYY!!!

3) Pacers V. Nets. All new faces on the Pacers. I am watching the game with my Dad and best friend. Reggie single handedly keeps the Pacers alive. 3 point shots from half court.. the most clutch shooting. Reggie pours his heart and soul in to this game. The Pacers were underdogs again.. and Reggie would see it through until they were contenders.

Reggie Miller defined never giving up. He was never my favorite player to watch, but he was always the player I wouldn't give up for the world.

Fireball Kid
03-27-2006, 04:08 AM
Reggie Miller was the reason why I got into Basketball. That alone should explain what I think of the man.

My favorite Reggie moment was in the Bulls series when he hit that three, God...........that was just so sweet. Everyone else (my family) was pissed that the shot went and my Grand PaPa thought it was a foul. I'm the only Pacer fan in my family. The rest wanted the Bulls to win. My Cousins, my Mother, my Granny, my Aunts, my Uncles, EVERYBODY! I thought for sure that the Pacer were going to win game 7! But they didnt......

I was heart broken. Something inside me said "If this team cant win a championship this year, they'll never win a championship." I've always wanted Reggie to get a ring but I just knew it would never happen because there were always better teams, better players, better coaches and it pissed me off, even to this day.

But I dont care. Reggie Miller is a champion to me. He was my first favorite player, and he is my all-time favorite player. The Pacers will never be the same, because they are missing a hero.

#31
03-27-2006, 04:14 AM
The Pacers will never be the same, because there missing a hero.

I feel like that to! How da hell can somebody fill those shoes?? Impossible! Its like if your heart left you and you are still alive.

R-R
03-27-2006, 04:29 AM
rcarey, I guess my feeling is close to yours. I am a Japanese, where the basketball is not so popular, and I've been a long-time baseball fan. Until I ran across into Reggie Miller.

For me, it was 1994, ECF Game 5. That was just shocking... I don't know what was so shocking for me, but just shocking and thrilling. It was like, "who is this crazy guy??" I know it was not a classic girl-meets-boy kind of Love, but I literally fell in love with Reggie at the moment. Because of his passion, his desire to win. And my love for him has been never changed. Not at all, even now.

I guess I am a luckier fan in Japan, because I happened to have studied English language, and I got a chance to go to Indiana for myself. Since then, I made many trips to Indiana and enjoyed to watch Reggie playing and enjoyed the Pacer games.

But it's not enough explanation why I have traveled to Indy so many times. Maybe this is a kind of outsider's standpoint, because I have been there as a student/traveler from Asia, which is outside of the heart of basketball country Indiana.

I also loved to see the way Indiana people react to Reggie. I just loved to see how strongly people and Reggie tied together there. I always felt how much Indiana loved him and how much he loved the people. I really liked it.

I always loved the way people shouted "three!" when Reggie took a shooting motion behind the three point line. And the way people jumping up from their seats with raising both hands when Reggie made a big shot. My first visit to Indiana was the MSA days and I got to learn soon how the Arena erupted when Reggie made a clutch play.

I just loved THAT beautiful atmosphere very very much. Love and loyalty -- between they and him.

When I was watching Reggie's last game on Japanese satellite TV, I was crying so hard and feeling sad, but I also think that was the most beautiful game Reggie had played (except the fact of losing). I really wanted to say to Reggie "thank you", but more than that, I really wanted to say thank you, to Indiana people. For loving him so much and making him happy at the end of his career. Certainly it was not a victorious ending for him, but it was so beautiful, so rare game.

It told me what Reggie had done throughout his carrer there.

I am not an American, and I do not want to be an American or even do not want to live there because I'm a Japanese and I am proud of being Japanese. I love my country. But, sometimes I envy Indiana people a bit. What is it like to have a man like Reggie as your hometown hero? It is the privilege I will never taste. It would be great feeling.

I will depart for Indiana on Wednesday (Japan time) for the ceremony. I am still Pacer fan despite of Reggie's retirement, so I think I will have more chance to be there. But this trip may be the last one to see Reggie being among the Indiana people, to hear the people chanting, "Re-ggie, Re-ggie." It surely must be the most emotional travel for me, I guess.

...I hope I could express what I wanted to say... Sorry my poor English if you don't understand :blush:

PS
Peck, I always enjoy reading your posts, but this is the best. You are just amazing...you made me almost in tears.

Big Smooth
03-27-2006, 04:32 AM
That was great Peck, I remember the 1994 playoffs better than any playoff run. The younger members of this forum cannot possibly understand what it felt like to finally win a playoff series. When I read posts from those of you under 25 years old complaining about how the Pacers have never won a championship. I just shake my head. I was 26 years old before the Pacers won a playoff series in my lifetime, a playoff series.

In fact for years and years they never made the playoffs. For years and years they never won 30 games. Most current Pacers fans have no idea what it's like to have 3500fans in the stands to watch the Pacers. The younger fans among us have no idea just how bad things were, just how close to leaving Indianapolis the Pacers franchise was. When the Pacers beat the Magic in 1994 I cried. Maybe partially I cried out of joy, but more than that it was a pride thing, I was so proud of the team and my emotions got the better of me. All those years of people making fun of me for being a Pacers fan, all those years of listening to Bob Lamey on my transistor radio when I was supposed to be sleeping, all those years of being sick and tired of the lovcal media ignoring or making fun of the Pacers, all of that seemed finally to be worth it.

What does this have to do with Reggie Miller? Well I strongly believe the team never would have won a playoff series in 1994 or in 1995 without Reggie Miller, Conseco never would have been built and Pacers would have left Indianapolis. Reggie saved the franchise, he rised the franchise to what it is today, Reggie did all that. Just think how many fans are Pacer fans today just because of Reggie Miller. He's the face of the franchise.

Years from now I'll be able to tell others about Reggie Miller and what he did and how he saved the franchise.

As far as an individual game, I always first think of game 5 in 1996. It was the deciding game against the Hawks at MSA and yes the Pacers lost. That was the year Reggie had the eye injury, he missed the first 4 games and came back for game 5, scored 29 points and almost lead the Pacers to victory in that deciding game. That game told us everything we needed to know about Reggie. His mental toughness was his greatest strength.

Not a diss, but I agree the younger fans don't see the big picture here. I started following the Pacers in 1986. Jack Ramsey was the coach and we played Philly w/Dr J in the opener. Pacers lost but I listend to every minute on the radio. The team had it's ups and downs. Can't remember the exact game but Stipo hit a 3 right at the halftime buzzer and I was excited beyond belief.

Losing the 5 game series to Boston was brutal.

But then Larry Brown entered the picture and the world of the Pacers fan turned upside down. After a 13-21 start, the Pacers sign Byron Scott and the tide turned. The P's finish hot to go 47-35. Swept the Magic w/Shaq & Penny. Then came Atlanta who was seeded first in the East. I just remember splitting the first two games in the ATL and then the Pacers dominating in Indy. At one point Bill Walton says "who are these guys?". Great stuff. Kenny Williams had his 15 seconds of glory.

And then New York. Damn, to this day I feel we should have won the title that season. The Knicks somehow got left off the hook.

But despite it all, the Indiana Pacers became a title contender for several years. Beating the Knicks in 2000 made my cry. I can't lie, I cried like a baby. I yelled to myself WE DID IT, THEY ****IN DID IT!!!!!

And we fough the Lakers hard. Lakers won in 6 games but the series could have easily went 7.

So given the current state of affairs, I feel good.

TRich
03-27-2006, 05:07 AM
Like many other Pacer fans, Reggie is the reason I started following the NBA. It takes someone special to get the attention of a young kid on the other side of the world whose only access to NBA coverage was a fortnightly newspaper. Yet Reggie did it.

It takes someone extra special to get this young kid to cover his walls with #31 posters and spend all his pocket money on #31 basketball cards. Yet Reggie did it.

While I will never have the opportunity to see him play in person, the memory will remain every time I shoot a three pointer... in the much practised Reggie style, of course.

Thanks from afar, Reggie.

317Kim
03-27-2006, 07:01 AM
This really brought a few tears.

I too am a youngin but I can't imagine growing up without seeing Uncle Reg at work. He was truly gifted. From growing up wearing leg braces and having to watch his older siblings play to making clutch shots one after another. It was always thrilling to watch a quick, trash-talking, 195 lb guard run aroung and curling off screens. He amazed me year after year.

I remember my first Pacer game ever back in 94. We played the Spurs. I just remember chanting Reggie! back then not knowing many of the other players. Well, post game came around and my dad had connections back then, so I got to talk to Reg for a good 45 seconds, and I asked him to marry me. The reply was that he was all mine. I cherished those 45 seconds and will never forget it. After that game I became quiet obsessive as others say, but others look at it as dedicated. I continued to watch his heroics year after year. The Dagger. All his 3's no matter how slim the odds he always looked at it as if it were a 75% chance of hitting 25% of missing. He was a role model, idol, heroe, and one of the greatest.


I miss ya Reg!

R3GG1E MILLER, 31 & Only....Smooth Criminal.

:boombaby:

RWB
03-27-2006, 09:33 AM
Funny, as many games I've seen my favorite Miller moment came on the second day he was considered a Pacer.

I can't forget listening to a radio interview the day after he was drafted. The interviewer bascially asked Reg how he felt being drafted by the Pacers and had he heard the grumblings from fans who wanted Steve Alford picked?

I refuse to believe this was rehearsed and came from Reg's heart. Reg said "Steve's a hero around here and I'd probably feel the same... But, I'm not worried because the fans here know and appreciate basketball. I'm going to give everything I've got and because they (meaning the fans) know the game it's going to work out great.

See, Reg could have come in with an attitude. Small market team, no glamour, hicks/rednecks, but instead he was the one to embrace our way, our concept of basketball. He didn't put down the fans because they wanted the local hero over him. Rather he decided too go to work, prove his worth, and man what a love affair we've had with this Hoosier who happens to be from California.

Ragnar
03-27-2006, 11:10 AM
The first time I had ever heard there was even a pro team in Indiana was the day after Reggie was drafted. I lived in Huntington Indiana at the time and there was no coverage of the Pacers. The only NBA teams I knew of were the Sixers, Celtics and Lakers. I had lived near Philly and the Lakers and Celtics always seemed to be on TV.

The day after the draft I was doing what a lot of Indiana boys do I was playing horse with my friends. One of the older boys in the neighborhood came over and *****ed about Reggie being drafted instead of Steve Alford. My grandfather was a huge IU fan and he probably would have agreed with that older boy. But in my mind this Reggie guy must be something special to be picked over the great Steve Alford!:D

There was still no coverage of the Pacers after that in Huntington. I know I missed a lot of great memories of Reggie since I had no access to games untill I was moved out and on my own. The first game I watched was in Novemver of 1992. To be exact it was Nov 28th 1992 against Charlotte. For the long time fans you know already this is the game where Reggie scored 57 points. Needless to say I was intrigued by this Reggie Miller guy.

The next year I got NBA league pass on my primestar satelite dish and have been watching ever since. What a great time to become a Pacer fan. I had the dissapointment of the 1992 and 93 seasons and that made me apreciate 1994 all that much more.

In 1994 a bunch of my friends talked me into going to Pieres with them durring a playoff game against the Knicks. They got me to go because they claimed that there was a sports bar and there would be a bunch of other Pacer fans there. (for those of you who do not live in Fort Wayne there is no sports bar and there were maybe 2 other people at the bar interested in the Pacer game who knows maybe it was ftwaynepacerfan and bigsmooth)

That was the night of the 25 points in the fourth quarter. I spent a lot less time with my friends from Huntington after that because they clearly did not have their priorites right. I vowed never to be away from a TV when a playoff game would be on. In all the years I spent as a traveling salesman I always made a point to find a place to watch the Pacers from then on. I saw Reggie play against Atlanta with a broken face from a bar in Louisville. I saw the 8.9 seconds from a hotel room in Tennesee. It always made me feel like I was at home even though I was not. I have mainly watched Reggie from afar. I did get to go to a lot of games in 2000 and what a year to get to go!

I believe there should be a Reggie statue. Today I see kids in Fort Wayne wearing Reggie and Oneal jerseys. When I was growing up it was Larry Bird and Isiah Thomas. You could not even buy a Pacer Jersey in Fort Wayne untill after 1994 and then it was only Reggie. The Pistons used to play in Fort Wayne and untill Reggie this was a Pistons and Bulls town. Now people here follow the Pacers. Thats all because of Reggie.

Doug in CO
03-27-2006, 11:42 AM
I do not know if I can make this into one moment. There were of course the Knicks and Bulls moments. I was at the MSA draft party in 87 - was 18 at the time - an IU fan - and I wanted no part of Alford. So I was happy that day (yeah, I was the one).

But the next several years I was a Chuck Person fan first and foremost. Until I saw what Peck saw - one person was fighting for respectability. The other would not settle for anything less than excellence.

I was there for game 3 - that was one of the happiest moments of my life - we finally mattered. I remember there were like 100 of us left when they finally kicked us out of the building. We didn't want to leave - and apparantly neither did Rik or Reggie as they were both out on the floor celebrating with us.

Now to my personal life and why Reggie, the Pacers, and many of you have meant so much to me over the years.

My wife and I married young, right out of college. We lived in Indy for the first 3 years of our marriage - and I was happy. Living in my home town. Decent job. Surrounded by friends from college and high school.

It was during the Pacers 1994 playoff run that my life was thrown a curveball. My wife found her birth mother, who lived in Connecticut. Her first visit was over Memorial Day weekend - I picked her up from the airport and she had a few NY papers with her with pictures of Reggie from game 5. I was never so proud of my home team than I was at that moment.

SAt the same time - she asked me to move with her - and I agreed - thinking it was a temporary thing, this is what good husbands do. Well it was more than temporary - it was more than 10 years as we just recently moved to Ohio.

To say I was not happy many days in CT would be an understatement. I hated it. So I do what many people do when you are in a position you hate - you escape. Reggie and the Pacers were both my escape and my ties to back home - where I would have preferred to be. I went to every game in the region, watched every game on the dish, posted on these boards way too much, and in general got way too emotionally involved in a game. Because it was more than a game or a team - this was the only thing of my 'home' that I could hold on to. Reggie and the Pacers were like my lifeline to home - my friends - for the 10 years I was out there.

Since then I have grown and matured as all of us do. But I owe Reggie a lot. He made my civic pride tangible - he was something people could see - he and the Pacers were like a showcase for my home to all of the people I knew in CT.

I also owe a lot of you - from Peck to BillS to Ben N and TWES - the old core team. Thanks to all of you as over the years we have shared a lot and many of you kept me sane in a time I felt pretty alone in terms of friends. We **** each other off, cross the lines sometimes, and just in general can annoy the crap out of each other. But in the end, I really value all of you guys and the forum to share our love for the Pacers.

Thanks - and sorry for getting so sappy.

Sollozzo
03-27-2006, 02:17 PM
It's funny that Alford has been brought up a couple times in this discussion.

The Pacers drafted Reggie Miller with the 11th pick in the first round. There were 23 first round picks in 1987. Alford wasn't taken until the third pick in the second round, or the 26th overall pick.

Anyone with any NBA knowledge whatsoever at the time wouldn't have thought once about taking Alford with the 11th pick. The only people who would have were obsessive IU fans with no knowledge of the NBA game.

RWB
03-27-2006, 02:49 PM
It's funny that Alford has been brought up a couple times in this discussion.

The Pacers drafted Reggie Miller with the 11th pick in the first round. There were 23 first round picks in 1987. Alford wasn't taken until the third pick in the second round, or the 26th overall pick.

Anyone with any NBA knowledge whatsoever at the time wouldn't have thought once about taking Alford with the 11th pick. The only people who would have were obsessive IU fans with no knowledge of the NBA game.

However, for a franchise that had trouble selling tickets it still couldn't have been easy for everyone involved. Those in marketing and public relations had their work cut out for them.

Actually as a Pacer fan we have to give out a thanks to Steve Alford. It made it easier for the Pacers to pick Damon Bailey in the 2nd round.

BillS
03-27-2006, 04:32 PM
I don't know if I have a Miller Moment, but Reggie helped give me something very important.

I moved to Atlanta in 1984, divorced in 1986 and remarried in 1987. When I would try to watch a basketball game those few times the Pacers were on, my wife would leave the room. I came to believe that she didn't like basketball, and drifted away from watching the games on TV.

I lost track of the Pacers for a while, mostly due to not having any kind of cable TV and not getting any decent coverage of basketball in the Atlanta papers. As the Internet became more pervasive, and the Web became more inclusive, I managed to find some sources to follow the team, but I never really connected to the members of the team again.

Until 1994.

I followed the Orlando series and was absolutely stunned when the Pacers pulled off the first round win - especially since it meant they'd be facing the conference-leading Atlanta Hawks in Atlanta for the second round! Woo-hoo!

I contacted our office ticket scalper and bought two tickets to the game, then called my wife for the obligatory question to see if she wanted to go. I figured she'd say no, and that would be that, I'd get one of the guys at work to join me, no problem.

She said yes, she wanted to go.

uhhh....whut? I thought you didn't like basketball?

Oh no, she told me. She just hated to watch it on TV because the microphones picked up the squeaky shoes.

The rest, as they say, is history. She went to the game with me, saw that sweet Reggie Miller 3-point shot, and became not just a basketball fan but a Pacer fan and, most particularly, a Reggie fan.

This means I get to spend my game nights with her, whether watching on TV or in person. We attend at least one game a year in Indianapolis (including flying in specially for the last regular season game at MSA and the first game at the Fieldhouse). We get to as many games as possible in Atlanta (though we have a conflict on Wednesday night, grrrr).

I see so many fans whose SOs (ok, can the PC talk, so many guys whose wives or girlfriends) don't understand their passion for the Pacers, much less share it. I count myself blessed to have something like this I can share with my wife, and I thank Reggie for his part in it.

Yep, the two of us will be there on Thursday night.

Boom, baby. Boom, boom, boom.

Since86
03-27-2006, 04:52 PM
The two biggest memories I have of Reggie, are the ones I missed.

I gave up on the Knicks game, and went down the road to a friends house to play basketball. I remember shooting around in his driveway, and him running out yelling about how he scored 8pts in 9 secs. to win.

Then during the Nets series, I wasn't able to watch the double overtime game. It was the same night as our county track meet. I remember standing around our assistant coach, he had a portable radio, with 20 other people from different schools listening.

I was actually in the middle of winning the 200m when he got the dunk to send it into 2ot.

Doug
03-27-2006, 05:51 PM
Reggie Miller was never my favorite Pacer.

Sure, I remember the big shots, the 8 points in 8 seconds, the Jordan push-off, the Atlanta game, etc. And cherish all of them. I know how much he has meant to both the team and the city.

But again, he was never my favorite Pacer.

I liked the scrappy guys who had to fight for everything they got, the ones that left everything they had on the floor day in and day out, the overachievers who had no business accomplishing what they did, but succeeded through pure hard work. The Heywoode Workmans.

Then a funny thing happened.

I realized that Reggie was exactly like that. It was almost like a light bulb went off. Or a blind man who can finally see.

Reggie, our very own "superstar", worked harder than anybody else. It wasn't magic that he was as good as he was. It was hard work!

And I was able to fully appreciate him for what he was.


Then, after the finals team was broken up, and he became "Uncle Reggie". Something seemed missing. I certainly appreciated his professionalism, but it wasn't the same.


Until the brawl.

This might have been one of the best things to happen to Reggie's legacy. No longer able to be "deferring Reggie", he was forced to put the team on his shoulders once more. And he did. At an age when most everybody had hung up there sneakers. The gunslinger, the assassin, was back. Ring or no ring, he went out like a true champion, fighting until the end, until every shot was taken, every effort given. Exiting the game like very few had before and very few will again.

People don't remember the dump-it-into-JO Reggie. They remember the clutch player with ice in his veins. The skinny kid darting through the lane, past two picks, and to the wing to thrust the dagger into the hearts of the opponents. They remember the Reggie we had, and that we will never see again.

Doug in CO
03-27-2006, 06:00 PM
My son (8) knows Reggie as the guy who didn't shoot enough.

That is because everyone was yelling at him to shoot in Game 5 of the ECF in 04.

I try to explain who he is - what he was... hopefully he will get it on Thursday night. If he does, that is a great gift for both of us.

Trader Joe
03-27-2006, 06:05 PM
Well, I am 18 now and in a lot of ways you could say I grew up with Reggie. I've had season tickets with my father for the past 3 years and have been a diehard Pacers fan since about the age of three when I would be watching TV with my dad and I would ask who we wanted to win, and he would always reply the blue team. I never really understood the concept of the Pacers till I was 5 or 6 years old and the 94 series against the Magic sticks out as my first memory. I try to remember Reggie's moments almost everytime as I sit in the stands waiting to watch the franchise that Reggie built. My favorite Reggie moment happens to be what some would call a sad moment, and that is Game 6 against the Pistons last year. There I stood with 20,000 people watching the end of an icon arguably an era. You see I always thought of Reggie's last game as the game that would end my connection the greats of the eighties when ball was ball. Reggie was the last connection to Larry, Magic, MJ, and the like and there it was it was over and everyone knew it. Nothing we could do nothing we could say could stop it. Reggie was pulled out and 20,000 fans in unison started chanting this famous chant of Pacerland, "Reggie, Reggie, Reggie". It grew louder and louder and seemed to almost freeze time, a man that for so long had been a cold hearted killer on the court stood looking as if he may breakdown pounding his chest pointing to the stands. The cherry on top of this whole experience was the group of 8 to 10 rowdy Piston fans that had been sitting in the seats across the aisle from me. There just 5 minutes earlier they had stood and talked about how Reggie was just old flopping joke, but now they stood and recognized chanting along with us. You see in that moment I wasn't just a Pacers fan I was a basketball fan. Larry Brown called his timeouts and performed one of the classiest acts I have witnessed by allowing it to build the chant echoing throughout the Fieldhouse. A legend was recognized and an era was closed. A legendary gun slinger went down with all the bullets empty, 27 points if memory serves. You see no other player has left like that being recognized by everyone most leave quietly in the offseason few leave with people chanting their name after they have just put on an authentic performance, that is what I loved about that final game of Reggie's career the fact that only Reggie could pull something like that off. The fact that it was just another Miller Moment.
I will be in the stands in my seats again on Thursday with the chance to chant "Reggie, Reggie, Reggie" one more time and to be quite frank I would not trade it for the world.

dannyboy
03-27-2006, 06:26 PM
I remember a moment from the last of the 4 or 5 times I got to see Reggie play in person. It was last season in Houson, in the throwback 80's jersies. JO had been back from suspension for a few games, and Tinsley was owning the Rockets that game.

There was a stretch at some point in the game where Tinsley had scored a few points in a row, and he received a pass at the top of the key. The Rockets defense over committed to him and he spotted Reggie all alone in the corner.

Tinsley threw him the pass and immediately started back-peddling down court. As Reggie caught it and lined up his feet, JO, who was under the basket, turned and started heading down court. Various Pacers bench players raised one finger in the air. My wife, an avid Rockets fan, yelled out "AW COME ON!! YOU CAN'T LEAVE HIM!!!" as everyone in the arena let out a collective groan. I just smiled and nodded.

Everyone in the arena knew what was coming. Swish.

Simply the best shooter I ever saw.

Sollozzo
03-27-2006, 06:39 PM
However, for a franchise that had trouble selling tickets it still couldn't have been easy for everyone involved. Those in marketing and public relations had their work cut out for them.

Actually as a Pacer fan we have to give out a thanks to Steve Alford. It made it easier for the Pacers to pick Damon Bailey in the 2nd round.



True, and they would have sold alot of tickets to IU fans in 87-88 had IU been here.

But eventually, the Alford honeymoon would have worn thin when Indiana fans realized he couldn't be a star in the pros. The Pacers would have continued to stay in the cellar.

Pingu
03-27-2006, 06:58 PM
I will be in the stands in my seats again on Thursday with the chance to chant "Reggie, Reggie, Reggie" one more time and to be quite frank I would not trade it for the world.


I would certainly trade the world for it, :blush: because:

- Without Reggie I wouldn't know where Indiana is.
- Without Reggie I wouldn't know who Steve Alford is.
- Without Reggie I wouldn't be in love with the 3 points shot.
- Without Reggie I would probably be a fan of some fancy team.
- Without Reggie I would never have cried because of the retirement of a basketball player.
- Without Reggie I wouldn't know Tinsley's nickname "Mel Mel the abuser".
- Without Reggie I wouldn't have had a 'fan pack' sent to me by a classy Pacers franchise, consequently:
-Without Reggie I wouldn't be able to exhibit in my room a framed autographed picture of Reggie.
- Without Reggie I wouldn't have a pacers poster on my wall.
- Without Reggie I wouldn't have had the 2003-2004 Pacers yearbook.


Without Reggie I wouldn't have read 'I love being the enemy' (the first book written in english that I've ever read), consequently:

- Without Reggie I wouldn't be able to read and write (poorly, I know) in english.
- Without Reggie I wouldn't know anything about american philosophers.
- Without Reggie I wouldn't have gotten to translate philosophy articles (to be published in a forthcoming anthology on consciousness).

- Without Reggie I would never have discovered NY like I did, desperately looking for his jersey in every corner of the big apple.
- Without Reggie I wouldn't know the city of Riverside and the nice philosophy department of its university.
- Without Reggie I would never have heard of Steak'n'shake.
- Without Reggie I wouldn't know what 'choke artists' mean.














But most his most important accomplishment is that:
- Without Reggie I wouldn't be a Pacers fan.









That's how big Reggie Miller is. :cry:

Jermaniac
03-27-2006, 07:21 PM
Great post Peck

Reggie made me into a Pacers fan and a huge basketball fan. Without him I probably wouldnt even like basketball that much. Like Peck, in Reggie's later years I began to not appriciate what Reggie was to this team. And when he retired I said we wouldnt miss him at all and the team wont miss a beat with Stephen starting. Boy was I wrong. I will always love Reggie for how he played and for what he did for this franchise.

Jaydawg2270
03-27-2006, 07:24 PM
My favorite Reggie Moment was definatley 2002 game 5 1st round agaisnt the nets. i thought it was over so i had a pillow covering my face all i could hear was Marv Albert screaming YES! and i look up and see the replay of one of the most amazing shots of his career

Pig Nash
03-27-2006, 08:18 PM
My memories of Reggie mostly end with me crying. But back to that later.

Yep. I'm 17 and grew up with Reggie as a Pacer. Reggie is the Pacers to me, he was on the team longer than I've been alive. Now, Reggie has not always been my favorite Pacer. I'm one of those guys who likes having a favorite player who isn't well known among my elementary school peers. Rik Smits was my favorite.

But Reggie was still way cooler than that loser Michael Jordan, he was a baseball player now anyway. And just like Jay hates the Green guys, I hate the Blue and Orange guys. My first tears as a Pacer fan was when we lost that series.

My next tears were of joy. DING DONG THE WITCH IS DEAD!!!

And then Smits hit that shot, and then we lost anyway! The horrors of being 7 years old. More tears.

Then I had to sit and stew and regroup while all of my loser friends at school got their precious MJ back. I hate the red guys too, but especially him and that stupid tongue, who does he think he is Gene Simmons?

So my favorite moment and the one i got to shove in everyone's faces was when Reggie got that shot. Oh man, was I ever cocky the next day. I was bookin tickets to Utah. We were only 2-2 but that didn't matter to me.

Since then Reggie has never been quite the same to me, he always seemed to be the go to guy but not the leader, we was like the grenade. Powerful, and deadly, but not what you used first. Losing to the knicks again, beating the knicks, losing to the godforsaken Lakers. I hate the purple guys. Pushing the nets to five games with nonames and Reggie. The Artesticle era. (i hate the blue and red guys) they're all reggie to me but not as vibrant as in my formative years. I will probably cry thursday night, and I wouldn't want it any other way.

brichard
03-27-2006, 09:51 PM
I'm not sure I could quantify a single moment, but I cherished them all. It is funny, I'm not really a fan of trash talking, but it is probably what I most remember about Reggie. Reggie gave something to the Pacers I grew up watching (terrible teams) a chance to win and a swagger. I loved the fact that we had a guy who was capable of hitting the big shot in the close games.

One of my favorite moments came last year. In spite of being hurt and X-rays clearly showing his arm was not healed... he told Rick Carlisle he wanted to play. After seeing the fans rallying around the team, all he wanted to do was to deliver for them. And that my friends... is Reggie Miller.

Los Angeles
03-27-2006, 10:34 PM
My favorite - and saddest - Reggie moment was this:

http://www.twospace.com/pacers/pacers-lakers07.jpg

This was not a remarkable game. It was not a win. Reggie went 1-7 from the arc. This was the one he made, and it was the last 3 I would ever see live.

Many of you have lots of memories with this team and many great memories of Reggie's last season, all the way down to that last loss against Detroit. But I'm pretty sure most of you would agree that seeing a game live is no comparison to seeing it on TV. Living 2000 miles away, I only had two chances in all of 04-05 to see the Pacers. First against the Clips, then this game against the dreaded Lakers.

When I took this shot - and it went in - that was it for me, and I knew it. All those Pacers memories with Reggie had left me and had already become a memory.

Thank goodness we have pictures to help us remember.

#31
03-28-2006, 04:15 AM
Great posts! Love this thread, keep em comin! :D

8.9_seconds
03-28-2006, 06:07 PM
Remember 39 at 39? That was amazing.The guy was nearly 40 and just pulvarizing the Lakers. That was one of the best things about Reggie, he always came to play. Even when he wasn't on too, he still gave it everything, and you could tell.

What really suprises me is how he could kind of hand over his spot to Stephen, trying to slowly bow out gracefully. I didn't like Jax at first, I was offended that they would give this guy Uncle Reg's spot, but once I saw how Reggie was the one doing it, I understood. I Love Reggie, and it sounds corny and a little cliched, but you don't have to win a championship to have the heart of a champion.

I Love you Reggie, Thank You.


"Light up your face with gladness
HIde every trace of sadness
Although a tear maybe ever so near
That's the time you must keep on trying
Smile, what's the use in crying
You'll find that life is still worthwhile
If you'll just smile."

OnlyPacersLeft
03-28-2006, 07:05 PM
ahhhhh reggie...I loved how hed sink almost every free throw he took. I loved how hed draw fouls...shoot I remember putting a hole in my wall when he hit that halfcourt heave vs the new jersey nets in gm 5 of the playoffs! I jumped in the air and wanted to run up the wall I was so happy.
I miss reggie but it is time to move on...pejaaaaaa is our assassin now!

#31
03-29-2006, 08:01 AM
It's funny that Alford has been brought up a couple times in this discussion.

The Pacers drafted Reggie Miller with the 11th pick in the first round. There were 23 first round picks in 1987. Alford wasn't taken until the third pick in the second round, or the 26th overall pick.

Anyone with any NBA knowledge whatsoever at the time wouldn't have thought once about taking Alford with the 11th pick. The only people who would have were obsessive IU fans with no knowledge of the NBA .

I know about that the Fans wanted Steve Alford, but i want to ask you guys... who da HELL was that guy? Why did you want him so bad? Was he really that good? Why did i never seen him play in NBA? What happened to him?

Peck
03-30-2006, 03:20 PM
Anybody else have anything before tonights game?:)

Chauncey
03-30-2006, 03:31 PM
In honor of Reggie , there's only one thing to say (even though its not true, ******..I know you're reading this!)

RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS
RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS
RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS
RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS
RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS
RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS
RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS
RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS
RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS
RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS
RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS
RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS
RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS
RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS
RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS
RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS RAS

Since86
03-30-2006, 03:36 PM
I know about that the Fans wanted Steve Alford, but i want to ask you guys... who da HELL was that guy? Why did you want him so bad? Was he really that good? Why did i never seen him play in NBA? What happened to him?

High school
Alford played basketball at the high school level for his father, Sam Alford, who was coach at the Chrysler High School in New Castle. As a high school senior, he average 37.7 points per game, which led to his being named Indiana's Mr. Basketball in 1983.

College
Alford attended Indiana University. During his time there, he played basketball under head coach Bobby Knight and became the university's all time leading scorer with 2,438 points. Alford was the first player to be named the team's MVP four times. He was also a first team All-American, and was named Big Ten MVP during his senior year of college. In the Legends of College Basketball by The Sporting News Alford was no. 35 on the list of the 100 greatest Division One college basketball players.

During his final three seasons Alford earned first team all-Big Ten honors. He earned all-America honors as a junior. As a sophomore Alford was named to the NIT all-tourney team after the Hoosiers finished second to UCLA. Alford's free throw percentage of .897 (535-596) is fourth best in the history of the NCAA, and as a freshman he led the nation in free throw percentage.

For the 1984 Summer Olympics Alford was selected to play on the U.S. Basketball Team, coached by Bobby Knight. Alford averaged 10.3 points per game, was second in assists, and shot .644 from the field. He and his teammates went on to win the gold medal at the 1984 games. In this game Alford played alongside men such as Michael Jordan, Patrick Ewing, Sam Perkins, Chris Mullin and Wayman Tisdale. Alford has recounted that during the Olympic training camp, Jordan bet him $100 that he would not last four years on Knight's Indiana team.

Glory
In 1987 Alford led the Hoosiers to the NCAA Championship Game against Syracuse. The game was won on a late shot by Indiana guard Keith Smart but Alford did his part shooting 7-10 from the 3pt line and scoring 23 points. The 1987 NCAA Championship Game capped off one of the most successful playing careers in the history of Indiana University basketball.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steve_Alford

brichard
03-30-2006, 03:37 PM
I tried to skim to make sure nobody else had missed it, but alongside his awesome last second heave, I LOVED the dunk in NJ.

The old man drives down the lane and throws it down!!!! A great moment.

And I can't remember which one it was, but there is a heavy set blonde woman sitting near the basket in one of those Knicks games. Reggie gets the ball wide open and as soon as he gets it you see her mouth the words "Oh S--t!" I always look for her on the re-plays.

His altercation with Matt Geiger was good as well. Go after 'em Reg! Of course it helps when you are surrounded by Dale Davis. :cool:

McClintic Sphere
03-30-2006, 03:39 PM
For those going to the game, give an extra holla to Uncle Reg from MSphere.