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indygeezer
02-09-2006, 02:34 PM
http://chineseculture.about.com/library/symbol/blcc.htm

I've been looking at this and looking at this and I cannot figure out how to get the symbols for Indiana Pacers as my avatar (since I used to speak college level Chinese). Well anyway. I thought ya'll, especially our Chinese friends, might find this interesting.

I did print out Indiana Pacers (or what they claim to be) and have it hanging at my cubicle door now.

CableKC
02-09-2006, 03:04 PM
The link takes me to FAQ about chinese charecters.....what should I be looking for here?

indygeezer
02-09-2006, 03:42 PM
2nd bulletpoint under the alphabet is a toggle for Chinese names of Sports teams.

rabid
02-09-2006, 03:44 PM
copy this image

http://z.about.com/d/chineseculture/1/0/M/-/4/pacers.gif

tadscout
02-09-2006, 03:46 PM
Use this link location...
http://z.about.com/d/chineseculture/1/0/M/-/4/pacers.gif

rabid
02-09-2006, 04:03 PM
Here ya go geez:

http://sulu.informatics.indiana.edu/~gweldon/pacers/chinesepacers.jpg

ppjoey
02-09-2006, 04:17 PM
The Chinese characters of pacers shown in the website is, in fact, a poor translation, although it is indeed commonly used in China.

The first word means "a step"
The second means "walk"
The third means "people who ..."

The combination of these words is "walker", "pedestrain" or "someone who is walking". (well, no where close to the actually meaning of "pacer")

In Taiwan, we used a different translation (2-characters), but it is not a precise translation, either.

The first word means "slide", or "slip".
The second means "horse".

Some words or concepts, e.g, "bull", "buck", "rocket" may exist in cultures all around the world, and therefore it is easy to translate those words into any languages. But in contrast, pacers doesn't seem to exist as a common concept in Chinese culture, therefore, I think it is really difficult to represent the meaning of "pacer" in a few Chinese character, and of course, I don't think the person who decided to translate the names of sports team would even know the meaning of "pacer".

I put the picture of these characters here:
http://www2.ee.ntu.edu.tw/~b87020/pacers_chinese_character.jpg

In the left of the picture is the China-version translation of pacers.
In the right is the Taiwan-version translation of pacers, in traditional Chinese.

NewType
02-09-2006, 04:47 PM
Also in Hong Kong, they use the same version as the Taiwan-version.

Kaufman
02-09-2006, 09:36 PM
We use the Chinese version here in 'Tucky.

indygeezer
02-10-2006, 08:05 AM
The Chinese characters of pacers shown in the website is, in fact, a poor translation, although it is indeed commonly used in China.

The first word means "a step"
The second means "walk"
The third means "people who ..."

The combination of these words is "walker", "pedestrain" or "someone who is walking". (well, no where close to the actually meaning of "pacer")

In Taiwan, we used a different translation (2-characters), but it is not a precise translation, either.

The first word means "slide", or "slip".
The second means "horse".

Some words or concepts, e.g, "bull", "buck", "rocket" may exist in cultures all around the world, and therefore it is easy to translate those words into any languages. But in contrast, pacers doesn't seem to exist as a common concept in Chinese culture, therefore, I think it is really difficult to represent the meaning of "pacer" in a few Chinese character, and of course, I don't think the person who decided to translate the names of sports team would even know the meaning of "pacer".

I put the picture of these characters in the following URL:
http://www2.ee.ntu.edu.tw/~b87020/pacers_chinese_character.jpg

In the left of the picture is the China-version translation of pacers.
In the right is the Taiwan-version translation of pacers, in traditional Chinese.


I recognize the symbol for horse as being the furthest right, but the rest are foreign to me. When at my best I could only read on a 3rd grade level and that was 25 years ago. (also I'm used to the up to down format, but I know that in the Pin-Yin system they have simplified the characters and oriented them to western culture)

indygeezer
02-10-2006, 08:11 AM
Here ya go geez:

http://sulu.informatics.indiana.edu/~gweldon/pacers/chinesepacers.jpg


Woa Rabid....I LIKE THAT! But could I ask a favor? Can ya re-do it with the characters ppjoey shows? The two on the furthest right are what I'm looking at. If too dif don't sweat it but it.........:buddies:

ppjoey
02-10-2006, 12:01 PM
I recognize the symbol for horse as being the furthest right, but the rest are foreign to me. When at my best I could only read on a 3rd grade level and that was 25 years ago. (also I'm used to the up to down format, but I know that in the Pin-Yin system they have simplified the characters and oriented them to western culture)

Glad to hear that some people are interested in Chinese characters. The simplified chinese characters are easier to learn, and it takes less time to write, but unfortunately, it broke the rules and structures how these characters are made.

I really like the symbol for horse, it is called a "pictograph" in English. The symbol is actually a sketch of a horse, as you can see in the attached picture, which shows how the symbol for "horse" is evolved into the current one.

3Ball
02-10-2006, 03:35 PM
My favorite NBA Chinese name is the Mavericks. They are, somewhat literally, translated as "The Little Cows." Sort of, but it completely misses the point!

By the way, far and away the favorite team in China other than the Rockets, is the Spurs. They just can't seem to get enough of Timmy D and his cool demeanor and devotion to the team.

indygeezer
02-10-2006, 06:42 PM
Glad to hear that some people are interested in Chinese characters. The simplified chinese characters are easier to learn, and it takes less time to write, but unfortunately, it broke the rules and structures how these characters are made.

I really like the symbol for horse, it is called a "pictograph" in English. The symbol is actually a sketch of a horse, as you can see in the attached picture, which shows how the symbol for "horse" is evolved into the current one.

That is really interesting PPjoey...what is your hisotrical source for that? I'd love to do some reading into the origin of the characters.

You might "educate" everyone on the various meanings of the word.....mu and how you have to be careful how you say it.

Slick Pinkham
02-10-2006, 06:47 PM
My favorite NBA Chinese name is the Mavericks. They are, somewhat literally, translated as "The Little Cows." Sort of, but it completely misses the point!


There is an English dictionary, I forget which brand, that has the following primary definition for "wolverine": "a slow-footed mammal in the weasel family."

I always like to share that definition with Michigan fans.

:D

rabid
02-10-2006, 07:06 PM
Woa Rabid....I LIKE THAT! But could I ask a favor? Can ya re-do it with the characters ppjoey shows? The two on the furthest right are what I'm looking at. If too dif don't sweat it but it.........:buddies:

try this one:

http://sulu.informatics.indiana.edu/%7Egweldon/pacers/geezer.jpg