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Young
01-26-2006, 09:43 PM
I'm still a junior in high school so I have a little while before I really have to apply to a college but I have been looking.

I have been looking at schools with Sports Management type degrees and I found Northwood University in Midland Michigan, and Marian College in Indy. The problem with both those schools is that they are so freaking expensive. Northwood's tuition is 15,000 per year and I beliee Marian's is 20,000+ per year. That is a outrageous price to pay for an education.

I know that Ball State and Indiana State offer degree(s) that I have interest in but the problem is I am not going to Core 40 diplomia and I fear of how hard the courses might be at those colleges. I know I could pass the courses but by how much is something I don't know. So that is why I really haven't considered those schools besides the fact that I am thinking that I don't want to transfer or else I could just go to say Ivy Tech.

So, for all you college graduates out there who had a fairly high tuition, do you think it was worth it and how difficult was it for you to pay for your college?

One more thing, does anyone know if you have to be a teacher before you can become a high school athletic director?

Thanks in advance to anyone that responds.

18to88
01-26-2006, 09:49 PM
Don't go to Marian College. Anyway, Ball State and Indiana State are not hard colleges. I think the best for your money would be going to IUPUI's school of Physical Education and Tourism Management. Especially if you live in Indianapolis. It's a good school and it's not expensive.

http://petm.iupui.edu/pe_degrees.htm


IU Bloomington has similar programs through the school of HPER. It's about the same price as IUPUI for tuition but I have housing too so that more than doubles it.

http://www.hper.indiana.edu/academics/overview.shtml

Stryder
01-26-2006, 09:58 PM
I went to a small, private school where the tuition was 19,000 per year (that was a few years ago).

I was lucky because I got through 4 years of school, which amounted to about $100,000, with only owing about 10,000 to the federal gov't in loans.

I did it through a scholarship through the Lilly Endowment and, of course, the previously mentioned, federal stafford loan.

I'm a chemist, so I do not know anything about sports management or degrees such as those, but good luck with your endeavors. Work hard. Study hard. But, also take time out to do the things that you want to do. And everything else will fall into place.

Oh, and college is definitely worth it.

Kat
01-27-2006, 09:33 AM
I'm still a junior in high school so I have a little while before I really have to apply to a college but I have been looking.

I have been looking at schools with Sports Management type degrees and I found Northwood University in Midland Michigan, and Marian College in Indy. The problem with both those schools is that they are so freaking expensive. Northwood's tuition is 15,000 per year and I beliee Marian's is 20,000+ per year. That is a outrageous price to pay for an education.

I know that Ball State and Indiana State offer degree(s) that I have interest in but the problem is I am not going to Core 40 diplomia and I fear of how hard the courses might be at those colleges. I know I could pass the courses but by how much is something I don't know. So that is why I really haven't considered those schools besides the fact that I am thinking that I don't want to transfer or else I could just go to say Ivy Tech.

So, for all you college graduates out there who had a fairly high tuition, do you think it was worth it and how difficult was it for you to pay for your college?

Why won't you have a Core 40 diploma? From what I can tell, the Core 40 (http://www.doe.state.in.us/core40/pdf/Core40DiplReqsComp.pdf) isn't that different from your standard high school curriculum. What are you lacking? Is there any chance you can complete the Core 40 in your senior year?

It seems to me like anyone who has difficulty with the Core 40 will probably have difficulty in college, which is probably the logic behind requiring a Core 40 diploma at schools like IU in the first place. Even if you excel in one particular area, and intend for that to be your major, all programs at the undergraduate level require general education credits, in areas similar to the Core 40. So if you don't have the aptitude to pass these class at the high school level, you'll probably have great difficulty passing them in college.

That said, even colleges that prefer Core 40 students will sometimes take students without it. IUPUI lists requirements for those without Core 40 (http://www.enroll.iupui.edu/freshman-admission.shtml). You should investigate the specific requirements of colleges you're interested in to see if you meet their minimum qualifications. Here's some info for Ball State (http://www.bsu.edu/web/admissions/freshcriteria/) and Indiana State (http://www.indstate.edu/join_us/fradmreq.htm). And if you're even close to meeting their requirements, why not apply? If they have a weak group of applications that year, or you show promise in other ways, you might get accepted.

I would be a little leery of a program with much lower admissions standards. Is the quality of their degrees really on par with those of other institutions? Will prospective employers respect your degree?

I can't really give further advice without understanding your situation with the Core 40.

Young
01-27-2006, 03:24 PM
Why won't you have a Core 40 diploma? From what I can tell, the Core 40 (http://www.doe.state.in.us/core40/pdf/Core40DiplReqsComp.pdf) isn't that different from your standard high school curriculum. What are you lacking? Is there any chance you can complete the Core 40 in your senior year?

It seems to me like anyone who has difficulty with the Core 40 will probably have difficulty in college, which is probably the logic behind requiring a Core 40 diploma at schools like IU in the first place. Even if you excel in one particular area, and intend for that to be your major, all programs at the undergraduate level require general education credits, in areas similar to the Core 40. So if you don't have the aptitude to pass these class at the high school level, you'll probably have great difficulty passing them in college.

That said, even colleges that prefer Core 40 students will sometimes take students without it. IUPUI lists requirements for those without Core 40 (http://www.enroll.iupui.edu/freshman-admission.shtml). You should investigate the specific requirements of colleges you're interested in to see if you meet their minimum qualifications. Here's some info for Ball State (http://www.bsu.edu/web/admissions/freshcriteria/) and Indiana State (http://www.indstate.edu/join_us/fradmreq.htm). And if you're even close to meeting their requirements, why not apply? If they have a weak group of applications that year, or you show promise in other ways, you might get accepted.

I would be a little leery of a program with much lower admissions standards. Is the quality of their degrees really on par with those of other institutions? Will prospective employers respect your degree?

I can't really give further advice without understanding your situation with the Core 40.

I won't have Core 40 because I haven't taken Biology, Chemistry, Algebra 2, or Geometry as well as a a couple other courses required for Core 40. There is no way I can make it up now.

Kat
01-27-2006, 06:57 PM
I won't have Core 40 because I haven't taken Biology, Chemistry, Algebra 2, or Geometry as well as a a couple other courses required for Core 40. There is no way I can make it up now.

That is a lot of deficits.

So you fear that you can't get into larger, better known schools and, if you did, that you wouldn't do very well. Those are both legitimate concerns. But $15,000-$20,000 a year is a lot to pay for an education that might be below par. I would really look hard at the strength of each program (There are guides for this sort of thing, like the U.S. News and World Report) and the competitiveness of the field. For example, a 3.0 GPA from a really bad program in a very competitive field probably won't get you very far. But in a field with lots of employment opportunities, almost any degree will probably get your foot in the door.

My advice would be:

1) Pick up as much of the Core 40 in your senior year as you can. Even if you don't go to a college that requires the Core 40, it's good preparation for college course requirements.

2) Do more research on your chosen career. What's the background of most people in that field? How competitive is it? What are your goals? Are there things you can do outside of college classes to increase your chances of succeeding?

3) Do more research on individual programs (including admissions requirements, curriculum, program strengths and weaknesses, etc.).

4) Do more research on financial options. You're probably not eligible for merit scholarships, but what about loans? Grants? Niche scholarships? Part-time or full-time work?

5) Apply to as many programs as you can reasonably afford.

6) If you can't get accepted to a decent program and it's a competitive field, strongly consider taking general education courses at a school you do get accepted at and transfer later. Yes, it can be a pain, but it could pay off in the long run.

I would really hate to see you spend a small fortune on a degree that in no way helps you to achieve your career goals. Think carefully about your goals and how or if you can realistically fulfill them.

I really don't mean to be a downer, but not everyone's cut out for their dream job. For example, to be an athletic director you need to be able to handle budgeting. If math's not your thing, you're gonna have trouble. If you're a poor student and a college degree is necessary, you might have trouble. Then again, strong motivation can make up for a lot of weaknesses. How much do you want this?

I did a quick Google search and came up with this profile (http://www.womensportsjobs.com/sportsjobs/jphighschool/jphighschool.htm) for an athletic director:

High School Athletic Director

The High School Athletic Director is responsible for developing the athletic program within their school and assisting the principal in duties pertaining to athletics. The athletic director is responsible for ensuring compliance of athletic rules, monitoring student eligibility, evaluating programs and coaches, managing program budgets, assisting the principal in selecting a coaching vacancy, and attending athletic events. The athletic director will also supervise most junior high coaches whose program feeds the high school. Education. Bachelorís degree in Education, Masterís degree preferred. Most schools prefer valid Teacherís Certificate. Experience. Four years experience as a coach (Head coaching experience preferred). Resume Builders. Knowledge of budgeting. Good organization, management and leadership skills. Salary. Ranges from $40,000 to the top $100,000, depending on the school district and their funds available for athletics.

If you primarily want to be a high school athletic director, it looks like a degree in education is more applicable than sports management.

Young
01-27-2006, 11:00 PM
Thanks for the advice.

I have actually thought about graduating at semester next year and then starting to take General Education classes at Ivy Tech.