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Unclebuck
12-14-2005, 08:37 AM
Not sure what I should call this thread. These are articles from other cities about Artest and possible trades


http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/cgi-bin/PrintStory.pl?document_id=2002682479&zsection_id=2002115459&slug=soniglance14&date=20051214

Notes: Team makes Artest inquiry, says source

By Percy Allen
Seattle Times staff reporter

Ron Artest a Sonic?

Not likely, but league sources confirmed that the team has made calls to the Indiana Pacers about the oft-maligned forward.

General manager Rick Sund declined to comment on Tuesday, but acknowledged that rumors will continue to circulate about every team in the league until Artest is moved.

Co-captains Ray Allen and Rashard Lewis said they wouldn't be opposed to adding a player with Artest's checkered past.

"I think anybody would be welcomed until they prove otherwise," Allen said. "Whatever situations happened for a player in another city and for another team doesn't matter to me. I accept them for what they bring to the situation and how they act when they get here."

Said Lewis: "If anything, guys wonder more if they're going to be the one who gets traded and not wondering what it would be like to have him on your team. He's a good player at my position. It's just in the back of your mind. There's probably a lot of forwards in the league wondering if it's going to be them.

"Because if he wants to be moved and they say they're going to move him, he can't be traded for nothing. You got to get somebody for him and you got to get a pretty good player. It may never happen, but I never want to say never."


Pacers CEO Donnie Walsh said he'd grant Artest's wish and explore trade options. But finding a trading partner won't be easy.

For starters, a team would have to be willing to gamble on someone like Artest, whose checkered past includes sparking the riot at The Palace at Auburn Hills last season as well as several on-court outbursts.

Another prohibitive factor is his $6.8 million salary, which is comparatively low for a one-time All-Star and former Defensive Player of the Year. Indiana would have to accept a salary or salaries that are within 125 percent of Artest's in a trade, according to the rules of the collective bargaining agreement.

If the Sonics were to make an offer, it might include Vladimir Radmanovic, a 6-foot-10 three-point specialist, and possibly Reggie Evans or Ronald Murray, whose contracts expire this season.

Unclebuck
12-14-2005, 08:39 AM
http://celtics.bostonherald.com/celtics/view.bg?articleid=116987&format=text


Escape Artest: Pierce wouldn’t mind if Celts traded for troubled Pacer
By Steve Bulpett
Wednesday, December 14, 2005 - Updated: 08:14 AM EST

The Celtics have placed the obligatory call to the Pacers to inquire about Ron Artest, but, according to sources, there are no bargains to be had as Indiana tries to move the talented but troubled wing man.

There are no firm reports on what the Celtics may have brought up, but logic would say that Mark Blount and his contract were in the mix.

While teams this week tried to decide whether the entire package that is Ron Artest is right for their situation, Paul Pierce cast a yea ballot.

“Without question, I definitely wouldn’t mind going to war with Ron Artest,” the Celtics captain said yesterday.

Asked if Artest’s emotional issues are offset by his talent, Pierce said, “I think so. I mean, it depends on the coach who can bring that all together. I think the coach has a lot to do with it. People will put him in a class with Dennis Rodman, but what Phil (Jackson) and Michael Jordan were able to do with him — just bring out his talents and leave all that other stuff on the side — it made it work.”

Pierce, however, didn’t bother to walk up the stairs at the Celtics practice facility to express his feelings to Danny Ainge.

“I don’t think they (the Pacers) will trade him to the Eastern Conference,” he said. “It’d be nice though.”

Meanwhile, Pierce’s coach at first tried to avoid the Artest question.

“I’m not touching that one at all,” Doc Rivers said. “That’s a Danny Ainge question. I think you should ask him. I want to read that answer.”

On the matter of players who are equally troubled and talented, Rivers said, “I think every case is individual. I would love to give you the Artest answer, but I really have not given it a lot of thought yet. But I do think from the (Terrell Owens of the world) to the Ron Artests, sometimes they fit and it works, and sometimes it’s a bad gamble.

“Dennis Rodman, in my opinion, was a good gamble for every team he played on because at the end of the day -- even with all his distractions -- when he got on the floor he did his job, and he did it extremely well. And it wasn’t a distraction personally team-wise, it was more of a circus around him. I actually thought he helped us with the Spurs because while everyone was chasing his circus we could go home after the game. I thought he was a good distraction. There’s other guys when they’re attacking their teammates and all that stuff, those are bad distractions.

“With Artest, I don’t know. I don’t know if that’s good or bad. I know he’s a hell of a player. I’ll say that. And it’s rare that you have a guy that every night you can say, ‘You stop him,’ and you don’t have to worry about him. That’s a heck of a value.”

The Pacers are putting Artest on the inactive list as they try to deal him. That means Pierce won’t have him in his way when Indiana visits the Garden tonight.

“I’m a little disappointed at that, man,” Pierce said. “I think we’ve really had some great battles over the years. Unfortunately, I guess the next time we do battle it won’t be with him in an Indiana uniform.

“I think he’s pretty much the best defensive player in the NBA. You’re talking about a guy who can defend pretty much four positions. He’s strong. He’s got good quickness, got great hands. And then the way his offense has been coming around, it’s unfortunate that it’s come down to this situation with him.”

Unclebuck
12-14-2005, 08:40 AM
http://www.nypost.com/php/pfriendly/pfriendly_new.php


ARTEST IS LONGSHOT FOR JERSEY
By FRED KERBER

WASHINGTON — They certainly will make a call, but it might not be one of their more urgent ones because the Nets are not expected to be major contenders for Pacer Ron Artest.

"I don't want to say what we will or we won't do, but I think there will be a lot of teams that inquire because he's an outstanding player," offered team president Rod Thorn, who said he wouldn't discuss any Nets interest because Artest is under contract.

But indications are the Nets will not pursue Artest very hard. They would have difficulty compiling a package to interest Indy. Artest is a major talent — also a major headache. His track record troubles the Nets. Thorn pointedly noted that Artest's teammates have been less than kind since he made his desire for a trade known.

"There's a history of things with him — not just the fight," Thorn said. "There have been some pretty strong statements by some of his teammates. So maybe something [else] has gone on."

*


Tomorrow is the day players signed as free agents are eligible to be traded. The Nets will do the usual homework on guys such as Houston's Stromile Swift, Chicago's Malik Allen or — a long shot — Milwaukee's Dan Gadzuric. And the Nets would listen to any feelers for the guys they signed or re-upped: Scott Padgett, Lamond Murray, Marc Jackson, Jeff McInnis and Cliff Robinson.

Washington coach Eddie Jordan on Jason Kidd: "Jason Kidd is one of the top five players in the league in my book. I don't care how old he is or how slow he's getting. He wills his team. He knows how to set his team up, he knows how to set the defense. He's just a bulldog out there when it's time to win. If

Unclebuck
12-14-2005, 08:41 AM
This is a really good article. If you are getting bored with these or running out of time, read this one and then stop. Lots of good stuff in here. There are so much I wanted to highlight, but I only highligted one paragraph.

Really this article deserves its own thread


http://www.boston.com/sports/basketball/celtics/articles/2005/12/14/suitors_of_explosive_artest_may_be_playing_with_fi re?mode=PF

Suitors of explosive Artest may be playing with fire
By Jackie MacMullan, Globe Columnist | December 14, 2005

The Indiana Pacers are comin' to town tonight, but the gifted, self-destructive, enigmatic Ron Artest won't be with them. Artest, who drew the largest suspension in NBA history for his prominent role in the infamous fan/player melee last Nov. 19 in Detroit, asked for a trade over the weekend, telling the Indianapolis Star that his past ''haunts him" and while he likes coach Rick Carlisle as a person, he doesn't like playing for him. Artest's Mannyesque request included a short list of desired destinations: New York or Cleveland.

Good luck with that. At least Ramírez has 10/5 veto rights; no such arrangement exists in the NBA, which means Artest has no control over his potential landing spot. The Pacers can, if it behooves them, ship him off to the futile West Coast outpost known as Clipperland (oh wait, I mean Lakerland) or that frozen basketball tundra in Toronto.

In the meantime, Artest has left his team holding the bag -- again. He remains on the roster but is inactive, with pay, for the rest of the week.

''I'm disappointed," Carlisle said by phone. ''I felt as though I was one of Ronnie's biggest supporters."

''Hey, I love the kid, but it's not working out," sighed Pacers president Donnie Walsh.

Walsh emphasized that under normal circumstances, it's not his way to oblige a disgruntled player's trade demand, particularly when the decree is made through the media. But there is nothing ordinary about what Artest has done to this organization, which stood by him after he delivered one of the ugliest black eyes in history to the game.

His 73-game suspension last season reduced a championship-caliber team to rubble. Artest appeared on the cover of Sports Illustrated shoulder to shoulder with general manager Larry Bird this fall and vowed to make amends. Instead, for the second season in a row, he has ransacked his team's chemistry and its chance to establish itself as a viable threat to Detroit and Miami in the East.

Before he embarked on a scouting trip in Spain, and before Artest's trade demands became public, Bird acknowledged that his forward was struggling to define his role. He also expressed concern about his players questioning themselves -- and each other.

''They aren't playing as hard as I'd like," Bird said. ''That's hard for me to say about these guys, but right now it's true."

And yet, Bird said, lack of effort is not one of Artest's shortcomings.

''Ronnie puts in his time," Bird said. ''I don't worry about him being in shape. I don't worry about his effort. The only time I worry is when he loses his focus. When he has his focus, everything is perfect."

Bird had barely punched in his frequent flier number and eased his creaky back into his first-class seat for Madrid when his best defender, who leads the league in steals, demonstrated how quickly his focus can go haywire. In addition to stating that he wanted a trade, Artest suggested that he draws obvious mismatches almost every time he has the ball, yet rarely is allowed to exploit them.

''It's not my fault," he told the Star. ''Every time somebody is on me, it's a mismatch. It messes up the offense. I like Coach as a person, but I don't like playing for him."

Carlisle undoubtedly would find those comments amusing if they weren't so damning. Not only did Artest lead the team in minutes (37.7) before he went into exile, he also was averaging 19.4 points and 15 shots -- second only to All-Star center Jermaine O'Neal.

Bird was aware of Artest's frustration with his offensive touches.

''I know exactly what's going on in his mind," Bird said. ''He's thinking to himself, 'I work my *** off on defense on every single play, every single day. I should be allowed to take two bad shots a game.' And you know what? I agree with him.

''It was the same thing with Robert Parish. He ran the court in transition all the time. Most other centers didn't, but he did -- every time. So, once in a while, when I was running the break, I'd wait and give him the ball, because he deserved it."

While Artest's offensive game is underrated because of the impact his defense has, he is delusional if he thinks he's Kobe Bryant and can break anyone down on demand. The need to be the main man on both ends of the floor should give all potential suitors pause.

Oh, and there will be suitors. In spite of his obvious instability, Artest remains an intriguing weapon, and since the Pacers are not dealing from a position of strength, they will have to scrape to get 60 cents on the dollar.

The Celtics, like almost every other team, undoubtedly will explore the Artest landscape. Picture this hypothetical bantering: Boston will offer Mark Blount (his salary is a match). The Pacers will laugh, then counter with a multi-player offer that includes Artest and Paul Pierce as the principals. Now it's Boston's turn to laugh. Once the clubs get down to brass tacks, the Celtics could (and should) take a long, hard look at Ricky Davis for Artest.

Sure, Davis has been a valuable No. 2 scorer and has taken some of the pressure off Pierce, but when you are talking pure ability, the discussion isn't even close. Davis is a ''nice" player; Artest is a special player. And isn't it obvious the Celtics are in dire need of some defensive intensity?

Of course, as we have documented, Artest is unstable, immature, and represents a huge gamble from a chemistry standpoint. Davis is well-liked by his teammates, although he, too, has maturity issues and persists in counting his shots. The major difference is that his meltdowns generally occur on the team bus, not on the basketball court.

If Boston considers Artest too radioactive, that would be understandable. Yet the curious thing about Artest is that even after all the damage he has done in Indiana, no one has supported him more than Bird.

''Look," Bird said, ''what Ron Artest did last season was wrong. No one should ever confront a fan like that. You just can't.

''But I know Ronnie. I've talked to him a lot. I saw him here all summer, in the gym all the time, working out. I know deep down he feels so bad about what he did to this organization and his teammates.

''He's paid the price for it. He missed almost an entire year. He's had to face all of us, his teammates, the coaches, and the front office, every day, knowing he cost us a lot of money.

''I keep telling him, 'Just play the game.' Just put it behind you and play the game."

Remember, these words were spoken before Artest's latest blow-up. Larry couldn't be reached for an update on his assessment of his SI cover mate, but the rest of the team has won two straight without Artest and is prepared to move on.

''Obviously we'll miss a lot of the things he does," Carlisle said, ''but the last two games, we've played together."

''He's got too much baggage," Walsh said. ''Before this, he was actually very stable.

''But whenever he did something or said something during practice, everyone was on edge. The coach, his teammates, me, and Larry. We'd all sit there and say, 'Oh no, what's he doing?' Even if he wasn't doing anything, you could feel the tension."

Walsh acknowledged that Artest could wake up this morning, change his mind, and run back toward Carlisle & Co. with his arms wide open.

This time, he'd better not be counting on a warm embrace in return.

Jackie MacMullan is a Globe columnist. Her e-mail address is macmullan@globe.com.

Unclebuck
12-14-2005, 08:42 AM
http://www.newsday.com/sports/basketball/knicks/ny-sphey1214,0,3155370,print.column?coll=ny-sports-headlines

Frye too high a price for Artest
Jon Heyman
SPORTS COLUMNIST


December 14, 2005

If Ron Artest wants to come home for the holidays, we couldn't entirely discourage Knicks president Isiah Thomas from looking into it. With Latrell Sprewell in their past and Qyntel Woods in their present, the Knicks can't exactly claim high ground.

But before the Knicks seriously consider making a deal with another devil, Thomas must pledge three things:

One, Thomas has to hire a bench bodyguard. (No, not for Artest, but for the exposed fans sitting behind him.)

Two, he must agree not to sign Artest to a contract extension until he goes one full calendar year without disturbing either the team, its fans or the peace.

And three, and this is the important one, Channing Frye can't be part of any discussion or deal.

Of course, Part III of our agreement with Isiah likely nullifies any chance of a trade, since Frye is their only truly marketable player, the solitary Knick you could trade and reasonably expect to get back anything beyond gym equipment.

That's too bad. And by that, I mean, tough.

If Thomas thinks the only way to dig out of his team's monster pothole is by trading a young, promising, personable player who can hit the 18-footer in his sleep in exchange for a talented yet certifiable whack job, well, he has to find another way.

If Thomas can acquire Artest for anyone other than Frye, be my guest. But if it's going to cost the kid, hang up.

As it turns out, only half Frye's rep was true. Yes, he can shoot the eyes out of a rattlesnake. No, he isn't softer than 500-thread-count bed sheets.

"A lot of people took me lightly, to be honest," Frye said the other day.

Thomas has already done enough for the state of Indiana without gift-wrapping a 22-year-old player who's the Knicks' best player (sulking Stephon Marbury is practically useless in Larry Brown's win-oriented system) and worthy future centerpiece in exchange for an ingrate the Pacers are happy to be rid of.

Isiah already has taken enough heat to walk around today without a winter coat. But give him this. He knew exactly what he had in Frye at No. 8 overall. He locked him up early, squirreling him away from Utah and Toronto by convincing the player to lock the door when they came calling for workouts.

Now, everyone knows why Thomas handled Frye the way he used to take care of the basketball. Like it belonged to him.

"Oh man, he's going to be a star," said Michael Redd, the Bucks' star, after Frye's shooting kept the Knicks around in their 112-92 defeat to Milwaukee (for a quarter, anyway). "From what I saw with my own two eyes, he's going to be great."

And yet, there will be pressures to relinquish Thomas' prize catch. We can't be sure what Brown's saying behind the scenes, but on Monday, before his Knicks failed to play defense and Brown lamented a lack of effort, Brown remarked upon being quizzed that Artest is "great on both ends of the court," and that "every night gives an unbelievable effort."

Brown's a defensive nut who probably rues every day the losses of Kurt Thomas and even Nazr Mohammed. So it's no great leap to think he sees the artiste in Artest.

That's not to say Brown or anyone else is down on Frye. The stat sheet does not lie. The 6-11 Frye is shooting 52 percent, he's averaging 15.4 points (second best on the team) and has 114 rebounds (best on the team). So much for soft.

Frye has a certain edge that wasn't previously noticed, and he relishes the challenge. He wasn't an unwitting dupe when Thomas locked him away; the White Plains native wanted to come here. "I felt like New York's the place for me," Frye said.

He wants nothing more than to show folks they were wrong about him. Pitted Monday against the No. 1 overall pick, Andrew Bogut, Frye ate him up early, scoring 16 first-quarter points en route to his career-best 30 points.

"The thing that makes him special is his athleticism," Allan Houston said of Frye. "To be as good a shooter as he is and also be as athletic as he is, is very dangerous."

Walt Frazier has talked to Frye about creating opportunities off the dribble, and Frye is smart enough to listen. He told Frazier he didn't have to dribble at Arizona, but he understands he has to do more than shoot here.

"While everyone else is shooting threes in practice, he's working on things," Frazier said. "He's driven. He wants to be the best."

As it turns out, Frye's a lot better than anyone thought, maybe even better than Isiah thought.
Copyright 2005 Newsday Inc.

Unclebuck
12-14-2005, 08:43 AM
http://www.nypost.com/php/pfriendly/pfriendly_new.php
ISIAH WILL KEEP EYE ON ARTEST
By MARC BERMAN

Knick President Isiah Thomas won't dive head-first into the Ron Artest sweepstakes and make the Pacers an offer just yet.

Thomas is telling confidants he's taking a "wait-and-see" approach to see what other offers are made before calling Pacer prez Donnie Walsh. Perhaps Thomas does not want to be used by the Pacers in driving up Artest's price.

Thomas has interest in the guy he coached two seasons, as the Knicks have no starting small forward or toughness. Thomas knows his best assets are the young pieces and does not want to give them up.

The volatile Artest is 26, but considered a risk by some in the organization, especially playing in his hometown that offers more avenues for trouble. Artest has already smashed one MSG Network camera after a Garden loss three years ago. Artest, suspended for most of last season for his role in the great brawl in Detroit, professes he will sign with the Knicks as a free agent in two seasons, at 28.

Channing Frye, a favorite for Rookie of the Year, is untouchable. But Thomas may shy away from offering youngsters Trevor Ariza, David Lee, Nate Robinson or Jackie Butler. He prefers to offer the expiring contract of Antonio Davis. (Thomas would also have to take back an additional player, such as Austin Croshere to make their salaries match.)

Walsh said he doesn't need a marquee player — but a young guy with potential. Lee and Ariza fit the bill.

Marc Stevens, Artest's agent, sounds like he was trying to scare off other suitors when he told The Post, "He will be a free agent one day. If a team wants to pick him up for two seasons, that's fine. Ron has let it be known . . . he loves New York."

*

Unclebuck
12-14-2005, 08:46 AM
http://www.nj.com/printer/printer.ssf?/base/sports-0/1134538869136100.xml&coll=1

Nets Notebook
Wednesday, December 14, 2005
BY DAVE D'ALESSANDRO
Star-Ledger Staff
WASHINGTON -- Rod Thorn admits that his blood pressure might not be able to withstand having Ron Artest on his roster, though he doesn't entirely rule it out.

He just knows that if he were to trade for him, he wouldn't sleep that night, or many night thereafter.

"If you're interested, that's the first thing," the Nets president said of Artest. "As Donnie (Walsh, the Pacers CEO) said, you wonder what's the next thing coming. That's one of the things you have to look at."

And for many teams, that's the only thing you have to look at. It's also why the Nets are probably not in play for Artest, a team official believes. The Nets had yet to have any internal discussions of what they'd ante up for him, however, because everyone is waiting to see what the market will be.

Thorn himself didn't sound sure:

"There's a history of things with him -- not just the fight -- that's just part of him," Thorn said. "But I think there will be a lot of teams that will have an interest in him at some level. I'm not sure what level, but some level.

"I think most people do look at character, citizenship, whatever you want to call it in assessing (a trade possibility). I think Artest is such top-notch defender in the league, you'll see offers being made for him. At what level I don't know."

cramerica
12-14-2005, 08:52 AM
In the first one from Seattle, it sounds like Rashard Lewis is a little scared he might be the one dealt.

Unclebuck
12-14-2005, 08:59 AM
There are more coming from the west coast.

http://www.charlotte.com/mld/charlotte/sports/basketball/nba/charlotte_bobcats/13402293.htm?template=contentModules/printstory.jsp

IN MY OPINION/TOM SORENSEN

Artest can be fixed; Bobcats could do it
Damaged Pacers guard wants trade; why not accommodate him?



Ron Artest needs a new start. The Charlotte Bobcats are a new team. The Bobcats could use a leader. Artest could use a team to lead.

Anybody out there think the Bobcats should do anything but try to trade for him?

Hey, not everybody at once.

I realize Artest is damaged. He ran into the stands in Detroit 13 months ago to attack a fan he thought threw a beer at him, and didn't even get the right guy. The act was heinous and dumb, and the NBA suspended him for the rest of the season.

Artest always lost when he went one-on-one with his temper. But that changed this season. This season, he lost when he went one-on-one with his mouth. He loudly announced he wanted a fresh start.

If he stays in Indiana, Artest will always be the Pacer who triggered the worst brawl in the history of U.S. sports. If he comes to Charlotte, he will be the former Pacer who triggered the worst brawl in the history of U.S. sports. Baby steps.

To suggest he is the Terrell Owens of basketball, as some have, is off base. Artest is not malicious. He is a nice and unusual guy who, unlike T.O., does not require mass quantities of attention.

And no other player does what he does. Artest, who is 6-foot-7 and 260 pounds, plays superb defense. He leads the league in steals per game with 2.6.

He averages 19.4 points, but is the antithesis of the take 35 shots to score 30 points gunner that has become so prevalent. He makes 46 percent of his field-goal attempts and shoots almost 10 free throws a game. The free throws mean that rather than hang around the perimeter, he goes hard to the basket.

At $6.5 million a season, Artest is a bargain. And he is only 26. There is time to fix him.

Stick him in Charlotte Bobcats Arena and, well, I'm not saying the atmosphere will be like it was Monday for U2. But it at least will be in league with Dolly Parton, who plays the building Thursday.

And rather than impede the development of Charlotte's young players, he enhances it. As bizarre as his behavior has been, he wins.

"I like his game, I like his physicality, the guy is a warrior," Charlotte coach Bernie Bickerstaff says in an empty arena hallway before Tuesday's game against Denver.

Interested?

Bickerstaff pauses for one, two, three, four, five seconds.

"I think you're always interested in talent and I'm not trying to be political," he says. "I just don't know how he fits us at this point. Where does it take us at this point? I think that's the way we have to analyze it."

Here's another way. He takes you to a place you have never been. He makes you compelling.

He'll lose for a while, but that will make the victories sweeter when they finally come.

The Pacers undoubtedly want to send Artest so far west that he doesn't haunt them. But even though the Bobcats are in the hood, Indiana might not consider them a threat.

Who do the Bobcats give up?

Who don't they?

Unclebuck
12-14-2005, 09:02 AM
http://www.mysanantonio.com/global-includes/printstory.jsp?path=/sports/stories/MYSA121405.6C.COL.BKNmonroe.artest.12b97cee.html


Mike Monroe: Artest's trade logic runs short of common sense

Web Posted: 12/14/2005 12:00 AM CST

San Antonio Express-News

It was just one week ago, in this very space, when we discussed how difficult it is to trade a player who states publicly that he wants to be moved.

Pacers' forward Ron Artest, it appears, doesn't subscribe to the Express-News.

Artest went public with his trade demand a few days ago, and the Pacers have put him on their inactive list, with pay. Making matters worse for the Pacers, Artest said he preferred to go East, and vowed that if the Pacers move him to a Western Conference team, he definitely would opt out of his contract when he is eligible to do so, after the 2006-07 season.

Mike Monroe: Artest's trade logic runs short of common sense




If you want to get traded, why make it doubly hard?

Of course, where Artest is concerned, logic just does not compute.

Pacers CEO Donnie Walsh says the team will try to accommodate Artest and send him packing but won't operate in panic mode. Walsh is one of the smartest men ever to make basketball decisions in the NBA, so count on the Pacers to turn the chicken droppings Artest has presented them into some pretty tasty chicken salad, though it won't be easy.

"When players come out and ask publicly for a trade, it makes it tougher, just in general," Denver Nuggets general manager Kiki Vandeweghe said. Vandeweghe knows a thing or two about how difficult it is. One of his own players, Voshon Lenard, did the same thing not so long ago, which is what prompted last week's column in the first place.

Some NBA executives argue that Artest is one of the league's 10 best players, something some of us always felt gives too much credit to his combination of skills and intensity, while ignoring what always seemed to be his glaring need for self-promotion and general wackiness. That intensity, in fact, made him defensive player of the year for the 2003-04 season, in no small measure because coach Rick Carlisle waged a telephone campaign on his behalf, personally calling most of the media members who vote for the postseason awards. His skills, at both ends of the court, are unquestioned.

Most NBA executives, though, also understand that taking on a player with the kind of off-the-court baggage Artest brings with him risks alienating both a stable locker room and a fan base that prefers its players to be less, um, flighty.

It is evident that one key Pacer, All-Star power forward Jermaine O'Neal, is shedding no tears about the fact Artest has been de-activated. O'Neal is one of the league's true "stand-up" guys. When you wear him out, you succeed only in diminishing yourself.

Artest has become the NBA's version of Philadelphia Eagles wide receiver Terrell Owens: A me-first guy whose amazing individual skills just don't translate well to a team game. How to now get proper value in return for him, especially after his public demand, is a knotty problem for Walsh and Pacers president of basketball operations Larry Bird.

There is no shortage of suggestions as to how the Pacers can deal him. The most popular rumor flying around the Internet on Tuesday had Sacramento's Peja Stojakovic going to Indiana, straight up, for Artest. Maybe that is because Bird once called Stojakovic the NBA's best shooter, and because the Kings are off to a horrid start this season.

Know this, though: As of Tuesday afternoon, there had been nary a single conversation between the Kings and the Pacers, about Artest or anyone else, and that is not speculation.

Expect things on the Artest front burner to heat up Thursday, when players traded over the summer are eligible to be traded again. And have no doubt some team will take the aforementioned risks.



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
mikemonroe@express-news.net

Unclebuck
12-14-2005, 09:04 AM
http://celtics.bostonherald.com/celtics/view.bg?articleid=116988&format=text

Young team can’t have bad influence
By Tony Massarotti
Wednesday, December 14, 2005 - Updated: 08:10 AM EST

The bait is out there again, once more in the form of a young and talented athlete with indisputable skills and questionable character. The block of cheese this time is Ron Artest, the Indiana Pacers swingman who punches first and asks questions later.

A word of advice for the Celtics:

Leave the cheese for someone else.

“I’m not touching that one at all,” Celtics coach Doc Rivers said yesterday when asked if the C’s might be interested in Artest, who recently requested a trade. “That’s a Danny Ainge question that I think you guys should ask him. I’d love to read what he says.

“I really haven’t given it a lot of thought yet. But I do think that from the (Terrell Owens of the world) to the Artests, sometimes they fits and it works, and sometimes it’s a bad gamble.”

Here? Oh, it would be a gamble all right, particularly for a Celtics team that is doing that noblest of all things: attempting to build something. The Celtics are young and inconsistent, eager and impressionable. The C’s need a lot of things before they will once again be championship material, but one of them is not a holiday nutcake who just might be the best defensive player in the NBA.

At least not now.

Yesterday, when approached with the topic of Artest, a thoughtful Rivers instinctively mentioned the names of Owens and Dennis Rodman, a pair of regal talents who also happen to be royal pains in the cheeks. (Posterior, not Maurice.) Guys like T.O. and Rodman might be nice additions to veteran teams within an arm’s length of a championship, but they don’t survive long enough to be of value to a team like the Celtics.

Owens, of course, is Exhibits A, B and C all wrapped into one fascinating psychiatric study. A year ago, he was the key acquisition in getting the Philadelphia Eagles to the Super Bowl. This season, he has been one of the primary causes in their implosion.

Love him today, hate him tomorrow.

Now comes Artest — or should we call him “Tru Warier?” — who is either throwing haymakers at the paying customers or requesting time off to peddle his latest CD. Artest remains a game-altering presence between the wall-drawn lines of the basketball court. The problem with guys like him is that they have trouble staying inside the lines.

Meanwhile, the Celtics have a cast of young, developing players who are far better served to heed the instruction of their coach than to be influenced by the NBA incarnation of Carl Everett.

“As bad as it could be for the young guys, it could be good for them, too,” argued Rivers, choosing the path of political correctness. “It could be an example of how to do things (that provides an example) or it could be an example of how not to do things.

“It depends on who your players are. I think the reason why some guys fit is because their teammates make it fit.”

The Celtics? They certainly could use Artest on the court. He was the NBA Defensive Player of the Year in 2003-04 and currently leads the league in steals, and he is averaging 19.4 points per game this season. Still just 26, he has blossomed into one of the best all-around talents in the game, that rare player who is a factor at both ends of the floor.

The Pacers, as luck would have it, will be in Boston tonight to face a Celtics team that is still seeking an identity, that is just starting to grow. Artest is currently on the inactive list and will not play again until the Pacers find a home for him. For now, at least, he remains with Indiana.

NPFII
12-14-2005, 09:20 AM
Said Lewis: "If anything, guys wonder more if they're going to be the one who gets traded and not wondering what it would be like to have him on your team. He's a good player at my position. It's just in the back of your mind. There's probably a lot of forwards in the league wondering if it's going to be them.

"Because if he wants to be moved and they say they're going to move him, he can't be traded for nothing. You got to get somebody for him and you got to get a pretty good player. It may never happen, but I never want to say never."


Rashard Lewis and Flip Murray for Ron Artest and Jamaal Tinsley

We get rid of Ron, and settle the PG spot. We get a great offensive punch in SF and off the bench. Flip is one of the most underrated SGs in the league. We become VERY deep at SG and SF with Jack/Lewis/Fred/Flip/Saras/Danny.

Seattle get defense at SF, with no (almost) decline in offense, AND a high caliber PG, which they desperately need. Flip is on his last year and they committed already to Ray Allen & Damien Wilkins, so they can spare him.

Slick Pinkham
12-14-2005, 09:22 AM
"I like his game, I like his physicality, the guy is a warrior," Charlotte coach Bernie Bickerstaff says in an empty arena hallway before Tuesday's game against Denver.

Interested?

Bickerstaff pauses for one, two, three, four, five seconds.

"I think you're always interested in talent and I'm not trying to be political," he says. "

Very interesting indeed.

I always figured that they would have ZERO interest. They do have intriguing young players-- Primoz, Ely, Rush, May, Wallace...

and no need to match salaries (under the cap).

I'd be talking with them a lot, if I were Larry

Mordecaii
12-14-2005, 09:27 AM
According to Donnie (go to Hoops Hype and the rumors section and there's a quote by Donnie Walsh there saying this, would quote it but have to get around using only the keyboard since my mouse is dead) the Pacers have been in contact with 15 or 16 teams about Artest, so it looks like there's some pretty good interest in him.

blanket
12-14-2005, 09:32 AM
can anyone post the NYT article from today (requires site registration). I think it has some quotes from Donnie.

obnoxiousmodesty
12-14-2005, 09:36 AM
I'm not really surprised by the number of teams calling about Ron; however, I am surprised by the number of writers and television analysts eager to add Ron to other teams. I thought there'd be more outspoken trepidation in the papers.

bread
12-14-2005, 09:36 AM
Rashard Lewis and Flip Murray for Ron Artest and Jamaal Tinsley

We get rid of Ron, and settle the PG spot. We get a great offensive punch in SF and off the bench. Flip is one of the most underrated SGs in the league. We become VERY deep at SG and SF with Jack/Lewis/Fred/Flip/Saras/Danny.

Seattle get defense at SF, with no (almost) decline in offense, AND a high caliber PG, which they desperately need. Flip is on his last year and they committed already to Ray Allen & Damien Wilkins, so they can spare him.

I would do this deal in a heartbeat! But do they need Tinsley? I thought Ridnour was doing pretty good.:whoknows:

RSmits
12-14-2005, 09:39 AM
This is the most interesting one I've seen -- talks about GS possibilities:

http://www.contracostatimes.com/mld/cctimes/sports/13404119.htm

SEATTLE -- Make no mistake about it. To a man, there are a few Warriors who will tell you in a heartbeat they'd love to have Indiana Pacers small forward Ron Artest as a teammate.

"(Expletive) yeah," Warriors guard Jason Richardson said. "He's one of the top players in this league. To get a guy like that ..."

Artest has been a hot topic around the league since the Pacers revealed Monday they are looking to deal the embattled All-Star after his public trade request. Warriors executive vice president Chris Mullin has a good relationship with Indiana's CEO and president Donnie Walsh, who traded for Mullin near the end of his playing career and groomed Mullin for a move to the front office.

Rumors and speculation had made its way to the Warriors locker room prior to Tuesday's game. One player said he was told of a scenario of the Warriors sending small forward Mike Dunleavy and center Adonal Foyle to the Pacers for Artest and center Jeff Foster, whom the Warriors drafted in the first round (No. 21) of the 1999 draft and immediately traded his rights to Indiana for the rights to guard Vonteego Cummings and a future pick.
The numbers match, as the Pacers' pair will earn $11.8 million this season and the Warriors' pair will make $11.9 million. Because both teams are over the salary cap, the contracts only have to come to within 25 percent of each other instead of the usual 15 percent. Also, Dunleavy and whichever one of the Warriors' younger talents -- i.e., forward/center Andris Biedrins, forward Zarko Cabarkapa, swingman Mickael Pietrus -- Indiana wants would fit. Guard Derek Fisher could be traded straight up for Artest, although it would certainly take a draft pick or a young talent to make it worth the Pacers' while.

If the Warriors were to acquire Artest, that would give them a starting perimeter of Artest, Richardson and Baron Davis. It would also significantly improve their ability to defend the perimeter.

"He plays so hard all the time," Foyle said. "We could use that. I admire anyone who plays like that."

Artest, who missed most of last season after being suspended for his part in the infamous brawl at The Palace of Auburn Hills, would certainly bring a circus to town and challenge the mellow mood of the Warriors locker room. He seems to be a magnet for controversy and is known for his temper.
The Warriors have a pretty reserved locker room, with Davis being the most flamboyant character. There seems to be little or no in-fighting and they have avoided off-the-court problems in recent years. Like Tabasco sauce on scrambled eggs, adding Artest would certainly give the Warriors roster some kick.

Warriors forward Troy Murphy said he wouldn't mind one bit.
"He'd be great (for us)," Murphy said with a smile. "It's too quiet around here."

able
12-14-2005, 09:42 AM
this is all from NYT:

REBOUNDS

While the Indiana Pacers field trade offers for Ron Artest, the Knicks continue to monitor the situation from a distance. "I've heard from 15 or 16 teams, but the Knicks were not one of them," said Donnie Walsh, the Pacers' chief executive. "There were some offers that were interesting." ...Penny Hardaway was scheduled to have tests on his right knee, which has tendinitis, and his left quadriceps Tuesday. ...Orlando's Grant Hill will make his season debut Wednesday, six weeks after having surgery for a sports hernia. The Magic has gone 8-11 without Hill.

Unclebuck
12-14-2005, 09:45 AM
I'm not really surprised by the number of teams calling about Ron; however, I am surprised by the number of writers and television analysts eager to add Ron to other teams. I thought there'd be more outspoken trepidation in the papers.



I think most Pacers fans take his game for granted. He is a great player. We are used to his defense, other teams crave the defense that he plays. I always laugh when I hear or read about how so and so is a good defender. I always think compared to who. Compared to Ron everyone else pales in comparison. Getting to the free throw line almost 10 times per game also helps your defense.

if Ron had no issues to speak of what-so-ever. His trade value would be top 5 in the NBA.


Other players obviously respect Ron's game a great deal.

I think the Warriors might be the most likely trade partner. They have multiple players the pacers could want.,

NPFII
12-14-2005, 09:46 AM
I would do this deal in a heartbeat! But do they need Tinsley? I thought Ridnour was doing pretty good.:whoknows:

Ridnour is "ok"... he's not great at anything special, and he's just "filling the spot". Tinsley is definitely and upgrade over Ridnour, who would be great as a backup.

Rhetoric question: If you had to choose between -
Ridnour/Allen/Lewis & Tinsley/Allen/Artest

What would you go for?

NPFII
12-14-2005, 09:54 AM
Right, but trying to seperate the TruWarier from the talent it like trying to convince yourself that the really attractive girl with 47 different STD's is worth it just for one night.

I dont know what an STD is, but as long as it's not AIDS, and the girl is REALLY attractive - "I'd do it in a heartbeat!"

blanket
12-14-2005, 09:59 AM
this is all from NYT:

REBOUNDS

While the Indiana Pacers field trade offers for Ron Artest, the Knicks continue to monitor the situation from a distance. "I've heard from 15 or 16 teams, but the Knicks were not one of them," said Donnie Walsh, the Pacers' chief executive. "There were some offers that were interesting." ...Penny Hardaway was scheduled to have tests on his right knee, which has tendinitis, and his left quadriceps Tuesday. ...Orlando's Grant Hill will make his season debut Wednesday, six weeks after having surgery for a sports hernia. The Magic has gone 8-11 without Hill.

ok, thanks

ABADays
12-14-2005, 10:08 AM
So sad to see all those quotes by Bird and see how he got repaid.

Hicks
12-14-2005, 10:09 AM
I dont know what an STD is, but as long as it's not AIDS, and the girl is REALLY attractive - "I'd do it in a heartbeat!"

You do that, and you live a (short) life known as "the guy with the funny syphilis."

Unclebuck
12-14-2005, 10:11 AM
This seems to have gotten lost. Would you do this deal

One player said he was told of a scenario of the Warriors sending small forward Mike Dunleavy and center Adonal Foyle to the Pacers for Artest and center Jeff Foster, whom the Warriors drafted in the first round

Mordecaii
12-14-2005, 10:12 AM
I don't like losing Jeff Foster, so no. Now if it was Pollard or AJ or something, then maybe.

Hicks
12-14-2005, 10:14 AM
Swapping Jeff for Foyle would be a big mistake.

Harddrive7
12-14-2005, 10:21 AM
The response from these teams are overwhelming thus far. I wonder if it's because Ron is really that good (which I'm sure that's at least 85% of the reason) or if it's because they're dealing with one of the best Team Presidents in the league?

Funny how there is more DW quotes than LB? Is LB still being trained ya think? Or does DW simply not trust him as much in this area. Someone demanding a trade. Is this new territory for Bird so DW told him to stand aside?

Just some things that crossed my mind.

Mordecaii
12-14-2005, 10:27 AM
Well, think of all the years DW has had to hone his skills? On top of that, Bird really poured everything he could into making Artest work, so I have a feeling his emotions could be a little too raw at this point. Bird seems more like a person to put himself and his feelings on the line and thus he might get a little too emotionally involved, whereas DW always struck me as a master poker player, never showing any emotion or tipping your hand.

Hicks
12-14-2005, 10:29 AM
If Bird's even back yet. If he is, I imagine he's glued to DW to learn.

Unclebuck
12-14-2005, 10:33 AM
If Bird's even back yet. If he is, I imagine he's glued to DW to learn.



Mike Wells said yesterday in one of his interviews I heard that Bird is still scouting, but is working the phone from I think Spain. I would think whether Bird calls from his Conseco office or a hotel suit in Spain, it doesn't make any difference.

But with how fast things are moving, most teams would want to talk with DW

Harddrive7
12-14-2005, 10:42 AM
Mike Wells said yesterday in one of his interviews I heard that Bird is still scouting, but is working the phone from I think Spain. I would think whether Bird calls from his Conseco office or a hotel suit in Spain, it doesn't make any difference.

But with how fast things are moving, most teams would want to talk with DW


So it's a comfort level for some teams?

That's right Bird is in Madrid. I forgot about that. I think that he was on the plane when he heard the news. I'm a little surprised that he didn't turn around and come back for this. Although, he very well could have without our knowledge.

I'm really glad that this is happening now. As I have voiced in the past, I really didn't like the make-up of this team. I would watch them of course, but not with the same enthusiasm.

I think that I'm more excited now than in preseason.

I also wonder how many GM's are getting a kick out of this? The "we told you so" GM's anyway. Although, they're probably the ones that are chomping at the bit to get him.

ChicagoJ
12-14-2005, 10:42 AM
Right, but trying to seperate the TruWarier from the talent it like trying to convince yourself that the really attractive girl with 47 different STD's is worth it just for one night.

:laugh:
Sig material...

Unclebuck
12-14-2005, 11:00 AM
So it's a comfort level for some teams?



They would want to talk to the decision maker. Nothing worse in busienss than having a long discussion with someone and think you have an agreement and then they say, well I need to OK this with so and so. (Of course DW has to OK it with the Simons) But if I were a GM with another team and was really serious about acquiring Artest I would want to speak with DW.


here is some stuff from Cavs fans,


http://www.cleveland.com/printer/printer.ssf?/base/sports/1134552900299310.xml&coll=2

Cavs' fans show favor for Artest
Wednesday, December 14, 2005
Rumors continue to swirl around Indiana Pacers forward Ron Artest, who announced over the weekend that he wanted to be traded and had the Cavaliers on his short list. On Tuesday, we asked Plain Dealer readers whether they thought the Cavaliers should try to acquire the controversial power forward. Nearly 70 percent of some 1,677 readers who responded said yes on cleveland.com, with a sampling of some of the responses:

Here are some forum posts from Cleveland.com's Cavaliers forum:

From: TXBrowns

I'll take him. Fresh start may help him, and it's a gamble, I know . . . but he's the best defender in the game and likes [Cavs coach Mike] Brown. For [Drew] Gooden or [Larry] Hughes, I'd do it . . . doesn't matter what position we give up since [LeBron] James can slide over to just about anywhere.

From: Lars3

Oh heck yeah! RON ARTEST could be the difference down the playoff stretch. . . . He plays better 'D' than the whole Cavs team. . . . HECK YEAH DAN GILBERT, BRING IT ON!!!

From: Jayteaz

I'd be shaking in my boots to make this deal. . . . It is a gamble, but let's not forget, Brown is not ignorant of Artest. Brown used to be an assistant coach of the Pacers, he knows what he's getting so if he is in [General Manager Danny] Ferry's office saying GET THIS GUY! . . . he has the confidence he can coach him. It's a gamble . . . but I think it's time for the CAVS to step up and separate themselves from being soft to legit.

From: ipspharm

All this Artest talk personally I think is ridiculous. There is no way the Pacers are going to trade him to a team in the same division. I don't think they would even trade him to a team in the Eastern Conference. It's nice to dream, but it'll never happen.

From: grooveman

Artest=[Dennis] Rodman, LeBron=[Michael] Jordan, Hughes=[Scottie] Pippen. This would never happen, but would be awesome to see. We have nobody to give Indiana beside Hughes and I wouldn't do that.

From: slam1079

I'm not saying we would win a title with Artest, though I think a talent like him could take us to another level. My question is, would you rather win a title with a "cancer" like Artest or be like the 1986-94 Cavs with a bunch of good guys who, let's be honest here, probably weren't tough enough to go all the way. I kind of see that with our team right now, we are soft and a guy like Artest could change that in a heartbeat. Did you see the Pacers' record with him and without him the past few years? It's like 70 percent vs. 53 percent wins or something like that. We always try to have "character" guys in Cleveland, but . . . to go all the way. Is he worth the risk, though?

From: dawghouse

We are the softest team in the league. He will bring toughness. Our defense is horrific. Every team in the league shoots the lights out against us and it is tough to watch.

From: Droughns1000

No way. I do not want him on this team. It will solidify the fact we will never win a title. That guy is more trouble than good. I can see it now. "Hello Mr. Ferry?" "May I please take all of April off?" "Why?" "Because my dog is sick and I need to go produce another third rate album!" No Way. Just Say NO To Artest!

From: Twa

I personally want Artest in C-town. I don't think the Cavs would be willing to give up on Hughes . . . If they should, that is another matter. I think the only reasonable trade the Cavs would make is Gooden plus Luke [Jackson] or Sasha [Pavlovic], maybe Z [Zydrunas Ilgauskas], but I think they would have as much trouble dealing Z as with Hughes.

Slick Pinkham
12-14-2005, 11:44 AM
The response from these teams are overwhelming thus far. I wonder if it's because Ron is really that good (which I'm sure that's at least 85% of the reason) or if it's because they're dealing with one of the best Team Presidents in the league?

A third reason is that teams saw how Detroit won a championship after trading for a troubled player, Rasheed Wallace, and particularly how they got him only giving up in trade a crushed bag of generic potato chips, in the scratch-n-dent bin, and the bag was also past its expiration date.

GMs want to know if they or their competitors can get a similar clearance sale deal, though I suspect that they know they can't with DW, but are making the calls to satisfy the owners who want such a bargain.

DisplacedKnick
12-14-2005, 11:46 AM
This seems to have gotten lost. Would you do this deal

One player said he was told of a scenario of the Warriors sending small forward Mike Dunleavy and center Adonal Foyle to the Pacers for Artest and center Jeff Foster, whom the Warriors drafted in the first round

I don't like Dunleavy much. He does have some skills but I look at him as the next Toni Kukoc. Foster's better than Foyle IMO. I think you can do better, even with a Ron Artest half-price sale.

In response to the Cavs fans post, Knick fans are ga-ga over the thought. The general sense seems to be that they'd trade anyone except Frye and maybe Curry for him.

Pacersfan46
12-14-2005, 12:04 PM
Foyle, and Dunleavy? For Artest and Foster? NEXT!

Arg, my stomach hurts. I'd give up Artest for nothing, before I give up Artest, AND Foster for "almost nothing". Blah

I can only imagine the Simon's would pee on whatever paper that offer was written on. Bad contracts galore.