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Frank Slade
10-19-2005, 10:02 PM
Pacers' Jackson says NBA dress code attacks blacks

By CLIFF BRUNT, Associated Press Writer
October 19, 2005
INDIANAPOLIS (AP) -
Indiana guard Stephen Jackson believes the NBA's new ban on bling-bling is racially motivated, but says he will abide by the rules.

The NBA has announced that a dress code will go into effect at the start of the season. Players will be required to wear business-casual attire when involved in team or league business. They can't wear visible chains, pendants or medallions over their clothes.

Jackson, who is black, said the NBA's new rule about jewelry targets young black males because chains are associated with hip-hop culture, and he said the league is afraid of becoming ``too hip-hop.'' In protest, he wore four chains to the Pacers' exhibition game against San Antonio on Tuesday night.





Boston Celtics star Paul Pierce agreed that the new rule targeted young, black players.

``When I saw the part about chains, hip hop and throwback jerseys, I think that's part of our culture,'' Pierce said. ``The NBA is young black males.''

:sunshine:Jackson defended his actions on Wednesday, but said he won't allow his feelings to cause a distraction once the regular season starts.

``They don't want your chains to be out, all gaudy and shiny. But that's the point of them,'' he said. ``I love wearing my jewelry. But I love my job. I love playing basketball more than I love getting fined and getting suspended.''

Jackson said he had enough problems last year, when he was suspended for 30 games for his role in the November melee between Pacers players and Detroit Pistons fans in Auburn Hills, Mich.

``You have to listen to the people who employ you,'' he said. ``The people who are paying us make the rules. You need to abide by the rules or don't work. I want to work.'' :sunshine:


:tsk:Pierce, who said the matter should have been brought to the players' association for a vote, said there are times he may not follow the rule.

``I dress how I feel anyway,'' he said. ``I think I'm just going to continue to dress how I feel. I think there's some days I may take a fine.'' :tsk:

Jackson first made his displeasure with the new rule a public matter on Tuesday. He said he hasn't heard from the league office, and doesn't expect to.

``I still have freedom of speech, don't I?'' he said. ``I didn't disrespect anybody by saying it, so I can say what I want to say.''


http://sports.yahoo.com/nba/news?slug=ap-jackson-dresscode&prov=ap&type=lgns
Updated on Wednesday, Oct 19, 2005 7:28 pm EDT

Kstat
10-19-2005, 10:05 PM
"I love getting paid more than I love wearing my bling.''

there, fixed ;)

BlueNGold
10-19-2005, 11:20 PM
I think the rule is racist. I think the rule makers knew this would offend some black players but they passed it anyway. However, I highly doubt bad intent was the reason the rule was created in the first place.

The rule makers are trying to repair the post-brawl image of the NBA and want what they understand, and the what the fans (many who are white) would perceive, as respectable, conservative attire. This does not include flashy chains. The rule makers knew there was a risk this decision would make waves, and it has.

Bball
10-19-2005, 11:31 PM
Pacers' Jackson Criticizes NBA Dress Code
Oct 19 10:45 PM US/Eastern

By CLIFF BRUNT
Associated Press Writer

INDIANAPOLIS

Indiana guard Stephen Jackson believes the NBA's new ban on bling- bling is racially motivated, but says he will abide by the rules.

The NBA has announced that a dress code will go into effect at the start of the season. Players will be required to wear business-casual attire when involved in team or league business. They can't wear visible chains, pendants or medallions over their clothes.

Jackson, who is black, said the NBA's new rule about jewelry targets young black males because chains are associated with hip-hop culture, and he said the league is afraid of becoming "too hip-hop." In protest, he wore four chains to the Pacers' exhibition game against San Antonio on Tuesday night.

Boston Celtics star Paul Pierce agreed that the new rule targeted young, black players.

"When I saw the part about chains, hip hop and throwback jerseys, I think that's part of our culture," Pierce said. "The NBA is young black males."

Philadelphia's Allen Iverson also was critical of the new rule, which the NBA made teams aware of in a memo Monday.

"I feel like if they want us to dress a certain way, they should pay for our clothes," he said. "It's just tough, man, knowing that all of a sudden you have to have a dress code out of nowhere. I don't think that's still going to help the image of the league at all."

Added Golden State guard Jason Richardson: "They want to sway away from the hip-hop generation. You think of hip-hop right now and think of things that happen like gangs having shootouts in front of radio stations.

Richardson added that nicer clothing wasn't necessarily the best way to determine the character of the players.

"You still wear a suit, you still could be a crook," Richardson said in Oakland, Calif. "You see all what happened with Enron and Martha Stewart. Just because you dress a certain way doesn't mean you're that way.

"Hey, a guy could come in with baggy jeans, a do-rag and have a Ph.D., and a person who comes in with a suit could be a three-time felon. So, it's not what you wear, it's how you present yourself."

Jackson defended his actions on Wednesday, but said he won't allow his feelings to cause a distraction once the regular season starts.

"They don't want your chains to be out, all gaudy and shiny. But that's the point of them," he said. "I love wearing my jewelry. But I love my job. I love playing basketball more than I love getting fined and getting suspended."

Jackson said he had enough problems last year, when he was suspended for 30 games for his role in the November melee between Pacers players and Detroit Pistons fans in Auburn Hills, Mich.

"You have to listen to the people who employ you," he said. "The people who are paying us make the rules. You need to abide by the rules or don't work. I want to work."

Pierce, who said the matter should have been brought to the players' association for a vote, said there are times he may not follow the rule.

"I dress how I feel anyway," he said. "I think I'm just going to continue to dress how I feel. I think there's some days I may take a fine."

Jackson first made his displeasure with the new rule a public matter on Tuesday. He said he hasn't heard from the league office, and doesn't expect to.

"I still have freedom of speech, don't I?" he said. "I didn't disrespect anybody by saying it, so I can say what I want to say."

http://www.breitbart.com/news/2005/10/19/D8DBG9H8H.html

Hicks
10-19-2005, 11:32 PM
It's been covered in the ESPN thread, but implying this is racist is absurd.

BlueNGold
10-19-2005, 11:41 PM
It's been covered in the ESPN thread, but implying this is racist is absurd.
I don't think the NBA executives were intentionally being racists, but I do think the rule on its face "discriminates on the basis of race" merely because it specifies a form of dress (ie. chains) that are worn predominantly by black players. I see no bad intent by the NBA, just a rule that affects one race more than another. Which by definition is racist, albeit with no malice.

ABA Jay
10-19-2005, 11:46 PM
As Mark Cuban stated tonight on SC, I think it has to do more with ageism than racism. Players such as Jason Williams also wear chains.

Stryder
10-20-2005, 12:13 AM
``I still have freedom of speech, don't I?'' he said. ``I didn't disrespect anybody by saying it, so I can say what I want to say.''


http://sports.yahoo.com/nba/news?slug=ap-jackson-dresscode&prov=ap&type=lgns
Updated on Wednesday, Oct 19, 2005 7:28 pm EDT

What he fails to realize is that speech is only protected from actions from the government. Freedom of speech ends there. He has the right to say whatever he wants...and the league office has every right to fine him (as he is an employee of an organization)...

I think more people need to read the Bill of Rights...

pizza guy
10-20-2005, 12:31 AM
It's not racist. You can have white guys wearing bling, too, and guess what? they can't wear it now either. Just because the rule affects group A more than group B does not mean the rule is targeting group A. Rules are laid down to be followed by everyone, regardless of race, gender, age, etc. It's a known fact that most players in the NBA are black, therefore, any rule set down by a white guy for a group of predominantly black guys is going to appear racist. The white guy laying down the law has the cares and concerns of everone in mind (at least, he should), and in making rules he must consider the ones being affected.

I still like the dress code. A suit will always look better than a baggy t-shirt and cocked hat. I don't have a problem with guys wearing that stuff, but, part of being professional is looking professional. That's the reason for the rule, not because Stern doesn't like bling.

Obviously, just look at Stern's car...
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v208/dungyisgreat/lowrider.jpg

Frank Slade
10-20-2005, 01:09 AM
What he fails to realize is that speech is only protected from actions from the government. Freedom of speech ends there. He has the right to say whatever he wants...and the league office has every right to fine him (as he is an employee of an organization)...

I think more people need to read the Bill of Rights...

I am sure he could care less about the bill of rights:laugh:



I think more people need to read the whole article .. he basically said he does not want to be fined . Geez people Jax says he is ready to be a good soldier and even admitted he is aware he has to follow the rule's set by the league...etc

If you have to hunt for something negative to pounce on after all that :tsk:

Diamond Dave
10-20-2005, 01:22 AM
Iverson thinks the league should pay for his clothes. :rolleyes:

Frank Slade
10-20-2005, 01:27 AM
Iverson thinks the league should pay for his clothes. :rolleyes:

I could care less ....Altough I will say whatever you think of him he is alot more business savvy then most players in the league.. for what it is worth....


Jackson, who is black
this the funniest part of the article... I am glad they pointed this out I had no idea :-o ......

IllWill
10-20-2005, 02:15 AM
I have no problem with having a dress code to an extent, but I think certain parts of this one can be construed as crossing the line. On the other hand, some parts are pretty linient, such as allowing players to wear "nice" jeans. I dont know if its racist, but it definately is targeting the majority culture of the NBA. It would be like banning mullets from NASCAR.

Knucklehead Warrior
10-20-2005, 07:18 AM
The NBA has no objection regarding tattoos, but you can't wear them during the game. :rolleyes:

Stryder
10-20-2005, 08:18 AM
The NBA has no objection regarding tattoos, but you can't wear them during the game. :rolleyes:

HuH?

indygeezer
10-20-2005, 08:18 AM
Jackson stuck by it and said his piece. I can respect that. I'm willing to move on and cheer for the Pacers (including Ron and Jax).

Evan_The_Dude
10-20-2005, 08:27 AM
and he said the league is afraid of becoming ``too hip-hop.''

This I agree with, but it's too late for that. This is the reason I think the NBA tends to get a bad reputation and nobody could figure out why. "Professionals" in any profession dress professionally PERIOD

granger
10-20-2005, 09:44 AM
maybe it's not about dress code, but can somebody answer how can rip still using that mask ?
i beleive it brings advantages to him.

devid stern what do you think about every player that brokes something on his face use a mask for 5 season idiot

thought_criminal
10-20-2005, 10:41 AM
I don't know, in theory it wouldn't be sexist to ban the sale of tampons because neither male nor female would be able to buy them, but who would get shafted there?

This is touchy, I don't like it. As long as JaX follows the rules, doesn't get suspended, and doesn't make us the quote unquote bad guys, I'm fine with it. I don't care about what happens off court, just that we have a 43+ win season and make the playoffs.

And I don't think that the mask helps Rip in any unfair way, he's just superstitious and likes to have the mask on. Just like Reggie and his resin powder he used for free throws.

I do think that the dress code will help with the league's image, IMO.

Stryder
10-20-2005, 10:55 AM
maybe it's not about dress code, but can somebody answer how can rip still using that mask ?
i beleive it brings advantages to him.

devid stern what do you think about every player that brokes something on his face use a mask for 5 season idiot

How does a mask bring him an advantage? I would have to say it is a physical disadvantage. Maybe it is an advantage mentally or psychologically, but then again, so are long socks, prayers, headbands, and music for some people...

Frank Slade
10-20-2005, 11:04 AM
Jackson stuck by it and said his piece. I can respect that. I'm willing to move on and cheer for the Pacers (including Ron and Jax).

I agree ,Wow that is an original Idea..?? Is that even allowed any more on this forum?

Insert hiding smiley here...J/K !

Moses
10-20-2005, 03:23 PM
I think it's stupid. Who cares what the players wear off the court?

It should be up to them on what to wear..and not the league.

IllWill
10-20-2005, 03:27 PM
Also dont forget that recently it is the fashion craze in baseball to wear a chain ON THE FIELD DURING GAMEPLAY. I'm waiting to see what happens with that.

Since86
10-20-2005, 03:53 PM
I think it's stupid. Who cares what the players wear off the court?

It should be up to them on what to wear..and not the league.


When their on company time, they're under company rules. Plain and simple. When their own their own time, they get to wear what they want.

Flying on the TEAM plane, is considered company time. They're represtenting not only their team, but the NBA as a whole, and the NBA has the right to tell them what they can/can't wear during that time. Just like your employer can tell you how you are to be dressed when you're at work.

Evan_The_Dude
10-20-2005, 06:00 PM
I was just browsing back over this thread and a thought popped in my head. I am pretty much in agreement with the dress code idea, but then I thought about it... They ARE already under a dress code on the court already aren't they? Isn't off the court a bit much?

Just a random though, but all in all I think the dress code while with the team is the right idea. No bling over shirt included.

Mordecaii
10-20-2005, 08:12 PM
Honestly, I really don't care if they do or don't have a dress code. But the NBA has every right to set a dress code, and if the players want to play then they have to follow it. When you are getting paid by an organization to work for them, then you follow their rules. Players can still wear their "bling" when they are not at an NBA function, but when they are working they must follow the rules of their job.

Personally, I don't see how difficult it is to follow the dress code... I understand the players complaining about it because they haven't had to follow one before now so obviously they would prefer there not be one, but anyone saying that it's unfair or racist or that the league should pay for clothes is going a bit too far. Does it mean that a black person working as a waitor at a restaurant that requires them to wear a suit is being treated unfairly compared to a white person at the same restaurant? No, they are both held to the same rules. It would only be racist if they were held to different rules. These guys make enough money to buy some nice jeans and a collared shirt, so I feel no pity at all.