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sweabs
10-15-2005, 11:28 AM
f

Pig Nash
10-15-2005, 11:34 AM
Whoa, that's horrible. My thoughts and prayers go out to his family and friends.

McClintic Sphere
10-15-2005, 11:38 AM
Man that completely sucks. I remember when he committed to IU out of Ohio and then later transferred to Ga.Tech. Seemed like a nice, kind of quiet, kid. I never thought he would be in the pros this long, but hadn't heard anything ever about him having arrythmia or similiar heart conditions. Sympathies to his family. Too young to die, for sure.

scar
10-15-2005, 11:41 AM
ESPN is reporting that it was likely due to a heart attack.

rel
10-15-2005, 11:45 AM
man...that sucks

deepest condolences towards his family and hawks organization

Pacesetter
10-15-2005, 11:52 AM
Unbelievable. I just read a story on him the other day, and it dawned on me he played his last couple years at Georgia Tech, and now he's playing for the Hawks which seemed like a great fit. I also noticed he one of his most productive seasons last year.

Very sad to see a basketball player depart this life, and especially one that you've watched play alot of ballgames!

My condolences to the Collier family, & the Hawks!

Frank Slade
10-15-2005, 11:56 AM
Very tragic and to be young and supposedly healthy just adds to it....

Certainly puts a few things into perspective as well...

BostonConnection
10-15-2005, 12:05 PM
I just read about this. Certainly puts even more scrutiny on the whole Eddy Curry affair.

My condolences to the young man's family. :(

Unclebuck
10-15-2005, 12:07 PM
I just read about this. Certainly puts even more scrutiny on the whole Eddy Curry affair.

My condolences to the young man's family. :(


Those were my thoughts exactly

ajbry
10-15-2005, 12:25 PM
That is simply horrible. I know his cousin.

My deepest condolences to his entire family.

Sollozzo
10-15-2005, 12:43 PM
The NBA seriously needs to investigate the effects of a grueling 82 game season combined with constant strenuous workouts has on the heart.

Raskolnikov
10-15-2005, 12:49 PM
this sucks

Harmonica
10-15-2005, 01:05 PM
The NBA seriously needs to investigate the effects of a grueling 82 game season combined with constant strenuous workouts has on the heart.

It's so rare. When you compare the number of athletes that die each year to the number of participants in both amateur and professional sports, the percentage is very, very small. Most of the time it's due to a previously undetected and underlying problem. And how many heart-related deaths can you think of in professional basketball? Reggie Lewis? His problem was detected and he received conflicting reports as to weather he should continue to play or not. I suspect he sought enough opinions until he heard the one he wanted to hear. I do believe the NBA season is too long in terms of wear-and-tear on an athlete's body, but it hardly warrants an investigation.

Shade
10-15-2005, 01:06 PM
Wow, definitely didn't see that one coming.

RIP Jason :(

Harmonica
10-15-2005, 01:12 PM
"Due to initial reports, Collier, 28, died in his sleep earlier in the morning."

http://sports.yahoo.com/nba/news;_ylt=AjgWggNuvPphdSIcmgrmR6C8vLYF?slug=hawksc ollierobit&prov=st&type=lgns


On the surface, my guess would be that he died of Long QT Syndrome. Though I imagine it might go undiagnosed because it's incredibly hard to detect post-mortem and it's a relatively new medical discovery in sudden cardiac death in young people.

Peck
10-15-2005, 01:33 PM
"Due to initial reports, Collier, 28, died in his sleep earlier in the morning."

http://sports.yahoo.com/nba/news;_ylt=AjgWggNuvPphdSIcmgrmR6C8vLYF?slug=hawksc ollierobit&prov=st&type=lgns


On the surface, my guess would be that he died of Long QT Syndrome. Though I imagine it might go undiagnosed because it's incredibly hard to detect post-mortem and it's a relatively new medical discovery in sudden cardiac death in young people.


I just set through a Long QT class just two weeks ago. The irony of that is that the guy who taught it was from Atlanta, GA.

Of course it's way to early to tell if this is what occured, but no matter the cause this is sad.

Harmonica
10-15-2005, 01:50 PM
I just set through a Long QT class just two weeks ago. The irony of that is that the guy who taught it was from Atlanta, GA.

Of course it's way to early to tell if this is what occured, but no matter the cause this is sad.

Of course, but it's the first thing I think of when I hear about a young person dying suddenly and inexplicably. And it's amazing how very few people in the medical profession know about it, although it appears that's starting to change.

317Kim
10-15-2005, 01:51 PM
that sucks...:cry: :cry: :(

Peck
10-15-2005, 01:55 PM
Of course, but it's the first thing I think of when I hear about a young person dying suddenly and inexplicably. And it's amazing how little known it is in the medical profession, although it appears that's starting to change.


Well to be fair it's been known for a long time, there just wasn't a name for it & it wasn't so closely scrutinized in the deaths of young people. I'm sure in retrospect a lot of people actually died of this but they just didn't test for it.

Also, GA is one of the leading states for research on this.

Harmonica
10-15-2005, 02:05 PM
Well to be fair it's been known for a long time, there just wasn't a name for it & it wasn't so closely scrutinized in the deaths of young people. I'm sure in retrospect a lot of people actually died of this but they just didn't test for it.

Also, GA is one of the leading states for research on this.

From my research, and if I recall correctly, I believe it was identified and given a name in the mid-90s. That's pretty recent. And yes, they now suspect that a lot of previously inexplicable deaths in young people might be attributed to this. Testing for it is difficult because the first episode is usually fatal. How many parents would have their children tested for it without some prior concern? And detecting it post-mortem, I believe, requires genetic testing from tissue.

Suaveness
10-15-2005, 02:44 PM
It's very unfortunate that one has to pass away so young. My thoughts to those who were close to him and his teammates

Pacers#1Fan
10-15-2005, 02:47 PM
RIP :cry:

himikey
10-15-2005, 03:19 PM
Unfortunately, history tells us that coronary events in 20-something athletes are more than likely a result of some sort of substance abuse.

Harmonica
10-15-2005, 03:34 PM
AP - Oct 15, 2:44 pm EDT
ATLANTA (AP) -- Atlanta Hawks center Jason Collier died early Saturday after he had trouble breathing and was stricken in his home, his father said. He was 28.

Jeff Collier told The Associated Press his son died in an ambulance on the way to the hospital and did not have any diagnosed health problems apart from his knees.

Jeff Collier said he received a phone call at 3:30 a.m. Saturday from Jason's wife, Katie, who said her husband was having trouble breathing and quickly turned blue.

"You get a call and it's your daughter-in-law crying saying she's giving him CPR and trying to keep him going," Jeff Collier said. "I guess it took awhile for the paramedics to get there. He had a slight pulse when they took him and he passed away in the ambulance while they took him to the hospital."

http://sports.yahoo.com/nba/news;_ylt=AudY6rkcUWSThykCPdQ0p928vLYF?slug=ap-hawks-collierdeath&prov=ap&type=lgns

shags
10-15-2005, 04:50 PM
From my research, and if I recall correctly, I believe it was identified and given a name in the mid-90s. That's pretty recent. And yes, they now suspect that a lot of previously inexplicable deaths in young people might be attributed to this. Testing for it is difficult because the first episode is usually fatal. How many parents would have their children tested for it without some prior concern? And detecting it post-mortem, I believe, requires genetic testing from tissue.

Just curious, is this disease more common in athletes?

Pacesetter
10-15-2005, 05:54 PM
I don't know but maybe he had sleep apnea?

A friend of mine died at 32 years old from this. He just never woke up. :(

317Kim
10-15-2005, 05:55 PM
:shrug: I'm not sure.

SoupIsGood
10-15-2005, 06:39 PM
R I P Jason

Harmonica
10-15-2005, 09:16 PM
Just curious, is this disease more common in athletes?
No. Although strenuous activity can trigger it and it primarily affects younger people.

Harmonica
10-15-2005, 09:20 PM
I don't know but maybe he had sleep apnea?

A friend of mine died at 32 years old from this. He just never woke up. :(

That sounds odd. Apnea is rarely the event that causes death with those who have it. Long-term it can lead to high blood pressure/heart attack or stroke because of the stress it puts on the respiratory system. Maybe he had something more akin to what Reggie White of the Green Bay Packers had.

Kaufman
10-15-2005, 09:25 PM
Hi all.
First of all, my deepest sympathies to the Collier family. I always felt for that guy when he left IU... our time their overlapped and I ran into him a few times in the library, though never formally met him.

If you all would be interested to know a bit about this from one doctor's opinion, I'll tell you what I know.
Jason probably died of sudden cardiac death. In fact, he ultimately definitely died of it. When sudden death occurs in young adults, atherosclerotic heart disease usually isn’t the cause, it is quite quite different than when older folks die of heart disease. More often these young victims have a thickened heart muscle, similar to those people I referenced yesterday in the Bron Bron conversation. Reggie Lewis. Hank Gathers. And the LN player.

In Jason's case of sudden death, I think he probably died of electrical conduction problems in his heart. Certain electrical abnormalities within the heart may be responsible for sudden cardiac death in the young. Just like a car is wired from steering wheel to engine to headlights to gas tank and all, the heart is similarly wired between different regions of the heart. So there can be some circuitry problems... these may include a short circuit between the upper and lower chambers (Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome). This sometimes can allow dangerously rapid rates to develop in the lower chamber when there’s a rapid rhythm disturbance in the upper chamber and a congenitally prolonged electrical recovery after each heartbeat. This is that long-QT syndrome you all were talking about earlier. This sets the stage for a fatal arrythmia.

I suspect drugs weren't involved in Jason's death. When drugs are involved, namely cocaine, there is a period of time where there is a lot of pain. A pain so bad, in fact, that it wakes someone up in their sleep and there is a feeling of doom. There is enough time for people to get themselves to a hospital.

Someone also brought up a great point about sleep apnea. This also can be something that is involved. I don't know how many of you remember what Jason looked like, but he had a large neck. Large necks can cause large people like Jason difficulty getting air in from his nose to his lungs when he is sleeping. However, our bodies register when we aren't getting oxygen to the lungs and blood, this is what causes us to snore, or in some cases wake up in the middle of the night. People with sleep apnea are often quite tired day in and day out because they keep waking up in the middle of the night. OSA, obstructive sleep apnea, rarely causes death in adults. It does in babies, but rare in adults.

In light of the tragedy though, its terrible for me to speculate. May god have mercy on Jason's soul and may the Collier family have the strength to live past this terrible loss.

Pacesetter
10-15-2005, 09:42 PM
That sounds odd. Apnea is rarely the event that causes death with those who have it. Long-term it can lead to high blood pressure/heart attack or stroke because of the stress it puts on the respiratory system. Maybe he had something more akin to what Reggie White of the Green Bay Packers had.

It sounds odd, huh. I can tell you with certainty that when they come to you and inform you that one of your best friends never woke up at a Church camp, when the last thing everyone did the night before was prayed before lights out, you won't think it's odd, you'll think it's unfair!!!!

RIP Jason!

Kaufman
10-15-2005, 09:53 PM
Well Pacesetter, with all do respect to your friend, sleep apnea isn't in and of itself lethal. It slowly leads to changes in the body that start showing up symptomatically around age 40 or so. But you don't just die because of sleep apnea. When your ability to inspire air subsides, your lungs can't get oxygen to your red blood cells, and then your red blood cells can't get oxygen to your brain, and your brain says, "Hmmm, we better wake up little Pacesetter so he can adjust his body and breath so we can get some oxygen!" and thats how sleep apnea works. Instead of dying, you wake up.

Kaufman
10-15-2005, 09:59 PM
If I can put it a different way... saying you die from sleep apnea at age 32 is equating dying from eating from a hamburger when you are 32. You keep eating hamburgers, and get increased cholesterol, fat, etc, etc, and you die of heart disease, ultimately. In apnea, you don't just die from one "episode" of apnea, it takes years and years for it to through the lungs and heart into chaos and then you die from cardiopulmonary disease, more specifically right sided heart failure.

Harmonica
10-15-2005, 10:04 PM
Well Pacesetter, in defense of Harmonica, and with all do respect to your friend, sleep apnea isn't in and of itself lethal. It slowly leads to changes in the body that start showing up symptomatically around age 40 or so. But you don't just die because of sleep apnea. When your ability to inspire air subsides, your lungs can't get oxygen to your red blood cells, and then your red blood cells can't get oxygen to your brain, and your brain says, "Hmmm, we better wake up little Pacesetter so he can adjust his body and breath so we can get some oxygen!" and thats how sleep apnea works. Instead of dying, you wake up.
Thanks, but no need to come to my defense. He obviously misinterpreted where I was coming from.

Kaufman
10-15-2005, 10:07 PM
Well since you didn't like the way I said it, I'll edit it out, man.

tora tora
10-15-2005, 10:15 PM
Does this mean John Edwards will start this season?

Unclebuck
10-15-2005, 10:23 PM
Does this mean John Edwards will start this season?
No they signed that guy who played on the Bucks last year and from I hear he looks like he'll be a real player

Pacesetter
10-15-2005, 10:44 PM
Harmonica, and Indiana31, if it's no trouble, let's try to keep this subject on topic. I'd like to specifically address each of your comments, but I think to do so in this thread would be inappropriate. In fact, to discuss it any further with either of you would be unnecessary. Thanks! :cool:

RIP Jason!

SoupIsGood
10-15-2005, 11:06 PM
Someone also brought up a great point about sleep apnea. This also can be something that is involved. I don't know how many of you remember what Jason looked like, but he had a large neck. Large necks can cause large people like Jason difficulty getting air in from his nose to his lungs when he is sleeping. However, our bodies register when we aren't getting oxygen to the lungs and blood, this is what causes us to snore, or in some cases wake up in the middle of the night. People with sleep apnea are often quite tired day in and day out because they keep waking up in the middle of the night. OSA, obstructive sleep apnea, rarely causes death in adults. It does in babies, but rare in adults.


Yikes. My grandpa has this, and I've pretty much got his body frame, especially the large neck. Some of these sleeping patterns you mention sound like they could fit too. Is this something I should worry about?

SoupIsGood
10-15-2005, 11:07 PM
No they signed that guy who played on the Bucks last year and from I hear he looks like he'll be a real player

Yeah, that Zaza Pachulia guy. If I remember right, it was a steal of a signing.

Kaufman
10-15-2005, 11:33 PM
Soup is good,

Well basically, as far as your grandfather goes, the thing is, it's a pretty easy diagnosis. We're usually talking about people with thick necks, often overweight people in general, those who snore, wake up in the night, always sleepy, yawning during the daytime. As far as your grandpa goes, grandpas always have a multitude of things going on, in general. But the thing about sleep apnea is, it's really quite treatable. If he's here in town, there's lots of good docs he can go and see, one group out of Methodist that I'm familiar with is called Respiratory Critical Care (RCC) of Indiana. He might need what we call a polysomnography, more affectionately known as a "sleep study". Do a search on the term "obstructive sleep apnea" and if you think your grandfather fits, go get it checked out.

SoupIsGood
10-15-2005, 11:47 PM
Soup is good,

Well basically, as far as your grandfather goes, the thing is, it's a pretty easy diagnosis. We're usually talking about people with thick necks, often overweight people in general, those who snore, wake up in the night, always sleepy, yawning during the daytime. As far as your grandpa goes, grandpas always have a multitude of things going on, in general. But the thing about sleep apnea is, it's really quite treatable. If he's here in town, there's lots of good docs he can go and see, one group out of Methodist that I'm familiar with is called Respiratory Critical Care (RCC) of Indiana. He might need what we call a polysomnography, more affectionately known as a "sleep study". Do a search on the term "obstructive sleep apnea" and if you think your grandfather fits, go get it checked out.

Ahh okay. I have some realy quirky sleep habits (like sleeping with my eyes open) so it wouldn't have surprised me if something was wrong there. Looking it to it though, it sounds like I'm good. :)

Kaufman
10-16-2005, 03:03 AM
Pacesetter,
I know you might think its off-topic, and that's fine, it's your opinion, but illnesses of athletes (Jason Collier), actors (i.e. Michael J. Fox), and other leaders (i.e. Bill Clinton) often times are great opportunities to discuss and encourage public health awareness.

I think it is important to raise knowledge about such things amongst people on the site. That said, I don't think it is appropriate or ethical to allow misinformation to be spread. Unfortunately you are doing just that, though certainly and understandably it is an emotional topic for you.

Sleep apnea itself does not cause death. It causes a slow deterioration of the heart and ultimately if sleep apnea is to indirectly cause death, it is essentially by heart arrythmias. But at a young age, where not enough time (years and decades) has passed to cause the heart to remodel itself, sleep apnea does not cause death because the body wakes itself up. If you would like to read up on it yourself, there is an excellent article in the New England Journal of Medicine from March 24, 2005, page 1206. If you are interested, I would be happy to email you a copy.

cramerica
10-16-2005, 03:32 AM
I've learned a thing or two. Sucks to hear about Jason. I liked him at IU and was upset when he transferred to GT.

Mr. Pink
10-16-2005, 04:38 AM
I was shocked when I heard it on the news at my girlfriend's apartment. Thanks for all the info that some of you have been putting on here.

I'm truly saddened this happened. It's just sooo damn tragic! I hate hearing stories like this about people who have potential to do things in their life, but he or she dies at such a young age to accomplish whatever it is they COULD HAVE done.

Deepest thoughts go to the family, friends, and fans of Jason. I'm sorry, man.

RIP.

Mr. Pink
10-16-2005, 04:42 AM
http://www.ajc.com/blogs/content/shared-blogs/ajc/sportscolumns/entries/2005/10/15/hard_to_make_se.html


Hard to make sense of a tragic loss

By Mark Bradley | Saturday, October 15, 2005, 03:44 PM

The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Mark Bradley

* Hard to make sense of a tragic loss
* Hawks appear to be big only on duplication
* Baseball boots it again
* Legacy of collapses grows into a curse
* Victory settles where this team belongs

Mike Woodson had seen him at practice Friday, not 20 hours before. Jason Collier had been shooting free throws, looking like a professional basketball player is supposed to look. “I thought he was in the best shape since I’d been around him,” the coach said.

Michael Gearon Jr. had seen Collier at the same practice, and what struck the Hawks’ owner was how the center had let his hair grow. “He looked more like a California kid than one from Ohio,” Gearon said.

Around 7 a.m. Saturday, both men got the same incongruous phone call. Jason Collier, age 28, was dead.

Having gotten a similar call, Billy Knight decided he really hadn’t. “I thought I was still sleeping,” the general manager said. Then, having awakened enough to realize what he’d heard, Knight got out of bed and tried to make sense of it. He failed. At such a moment, all human reckoning fails.

“Nothing can explain it,” Knight said. “You just sit around in disbelief for a while. And then you think of his family.”

This was Jason Collier: A big man who shot the ball better than big men customarily do. This also was Jason Collier: A husband and a father of a little girl who likes to ride horses.

Gearon: “He was a really fine person.” Knight: “He was the best.”

Today we Atlantans are thinking we didn’t really get to know Jason Collier the way we should have. He played two seasons at Georgia Tech and had been a Hawk since March 8, 2003, but it was his luck to have been part of aggregations that didn’t hold our attention. He was the best player on Bobby Cremins’ last two Tech teams, neither of which managed a winning record, and the Hawks have lately been a source of civic disinterest.

Today we’re thinking that we didn’t get to know Jason Collier and now we never will. We knew things about him, sure. We knew he was the son of a Tech basketballer - his dad Jeffrey played under Dwane Morrison in the ’70s. We knew he’d grown up in Springfield, Ohio, which is outside Dayton, and part of him wanted to come to Tech all along. But he enrolled at Indiana and became one of the last straws in the dissolution of Bobby Knight’s raging empire.

Collier left Indiana in December 1997, a month into his sophomore season. “I was losing sleep,” he said. “I wasn’t eating. That wasn’t the way I wanted to live my life… . If I’d known exactly what I was going to confront, I’d never have gone there. The biggest mistake I’ve made was going to Indiana.”

Funny how things work out. Collier fled IU because he couldn’t take Knight’s screaming, and he wound up playing for a former Hoosier who regards Knight as the greatest coach the game has ever known. “I never wanted to talk to Jason about leaving IU,” Woodson said Saturday. “I’ve never talked to Knight about it.”

As far as Woodson was concerned, Collier had done what he’d had to do. He’d found a program that better suited him and made himself a first-round NBA draft pick. (Acting for Houston, Milwaukee took him 15th overall in 2000.) He’d made himself a pro. “He’s part of our league,” Woodson said.

Then, shaking his head, Woodson corrected himself. “He was part of our league.”

Pro athletes aren’t supposed to die at 28. Pro athletes are supposed to be invulnerable. Pro athletes aren’t supposed to go home from practice on a Friday and be gone by the time Saturday dawns. “Life’s full of surprises,” Gearon said. “That’s the sad thing.”

Jason Collier’s teammates gathered Saturday morning at Philips Arena and then dispersed, an afternoon scrimmage having been canceled. In a further stroke of incongruity, Philips was being readied for a concert by the Rolling Stones. Not 30 yards from the Hawks’ training room was a suite set aside for Keith Richards, the scarecrow guitarist who has led a life of infamous excess.

Jason Collier died at 28. Keith Richards, against all odds, is 61. Try to make sense of that. Let me know if you ever do.

Permalink | Comments (202) | Post your comment | Categories: Hawks / NBA, Mark Bradley

NorCal_Pacerfan
10-16-2005, 04:43 AM
My prayers go out to his family and friends. RIP.

Mr. Pink
10-16-2005, 04:46 AM
Eddy Curry talks a little bit about his tests from the Knicks....

http://sports.espn.go.com/nba/news/story?id=2192066

ATLANTA -- Atlanta Hawks center Jason Collier died early Saturday after he had trouble breathing and was stricken in his home, his father said. He was 28.



General manager Billy Knight said the cause of death was not immediately clear for the 7-foot, 260-pound player. He said Collier had "no issues" in a preseason physical given to all players.

Jeff Collier told The Associated Press his son died in an ambulance on the way to the hospital and did not have any diagnosed health problems apart from his knees.

Team spokesman Arthur Triche initially said Collier possibly died of cardiac arrest, but would not provide details. He later said the team was not sure how Collier died. Collier's agent, Richard Howell, said an autopsy was being performed.

Later, Forsyth County Coroner Lauren McDonald said the family asked him not to release any preliminary results Saturday. He said he would make a statement Sunday.

"We'll wait until the experts can tell us, but there's no comments about any speculating at all that I'm going to do," Knight said. "Right now we just think about Jason and his family, his wife and a daughter. He was a good guy, a great teammate and a member of our organization. We're going to miss him."

The Hawks canceled an open scrimmage Saturday, but will play a preseason game on Monday night at Charlotte.

"We are saddened by the news of Jason Collier's sudden passing," NBA commissioner David Stern said. "He epitomized hard work, dedication and perseverance, and more importantly compassion, kindness and selflessness."

Jeff Collier said he received a phone call at 3:30 a.m. Saturday from Jason's wife, Katie, who said her husband was having trouble breathing and quickly turned blue.

"You get a call and it's your daughter-in-law crying saying she's giving him CPR and trying to keep him going," Jeff Collier said. "I guess it took awhile for the paramedics to get there. He had a slight pulse when they took him and he passed away in the ambulance while they took him to the hospital."

Tim Legler on Jason Collier's death
The death of Jason Collier is a great tragedy for his family, the Atlanta Hawks and the NBA family. My deepest sympathies are with the Collier family. I remember when I played for the Washington Wizards during the 1996-'97 season and the team took a cruise together in early August. On the way back our assistant coach Derek Smith died of a heart attack next to me on the ship. Derek was a former NBA player who played 10 years and was an exceptional NBA athlete. After his death the doctors diagnosed he had an enlarged heart and was lucky to have played those ten years.

His death will cast a pall over the team for the rest of the season. This is already a young team and Collier was a popular player who had worked his butt off to get to the NBA. Even though Coach Smith died in August and we had almost six weeks to our first game it was still extremely difficult to play and not think of the tragedy.

Losing Coach Smith was unbelievably hard to deal with because he was such a great man and friend. He left a wife and two young children who were on the cruise ship at the time of his death. I'll never forget having breakfast with his children the morning after his death. It was one of the most heartbreaking moments of my life.

On the team the people feeling the loss the most will be Collier's closest friends. Everyday they are going to have to look over at his locker and the memories are going to start hitting them. It takes a long while for players to get over the passing of a teammate because teammates are like brothers. These are guys who are around you everyday and who see you at your best and worst. They hear your bad jokes, make fun of you and most of the time have your back. The loss of Collier is going to damage these kids for a long while because they've lost their brother.


Jeff Collier told the AP by phone from his home in Springfield, Ohio, that his son had knee surgery when he played in Houston.

"We don't know exactly what happened," he said. "I'm anxious to find out. But I guess it doesn't make a whole lot of difference at this point."

Howell said Collier and his wife ate dinner at a restaurant Friday night and then returned home, where Collier spent time playing with his daughter.

"He started feeling real bad in the middle of the night," said Howell, who spoke with Collier's wife. "It's just very sad. I'm totally stunned and devastated."

"He was a down-low comedian," Hawks captain Al Harrington said with tears in his eyes. "He always had a joke for something that you couldn't hear unless you were sitting right next to him. He was a hilarious dude. And it's crazy to me to think we'll never see him again."

Harrington and Collier sat near each other in the Hawks' locker room. He and guard Tony Delk took the news of Collier's death especially hard.

According to the Atlanta Journal-Constituion, Delk said his and Collier's wives talked frequently and that their daughters played together often.

"Jason was just a different dude," Delk told the newspaper. "He lived out by Lake Lanier and nobody else on the team lives out that way. He used to talk about how his commute took forever. But he loved being by the lake."

Collier's death is particularly shocking in an era when an NBA player's health is so closely scrutinized. Eddy Curry, who was forced to miss time with the Chicago Bulls last year due to an irregular heartbeat, underwent numerous tests on his heart before his trade to the Knicks could be completed last week.

"I'm actually glad I took the test I did take [for the Knicks]," Curry told reporters before New York's preseason matchup with New Jersey on Saturday. "I had so many doctors look at everything about my heart to make sure I'm 100 percent ready to come on this court.

"But I hope [my situation doesn't overshadow] that something tragic happened and that it's a tough time for his family. You keep praying for the family and hope they make it through."

Collier was a part-time starting center the last two seasons after playing mostly as a backup in three years at Houston. He began his college career at Indiana before transferring to Georgia Tech.

Former Tech coach Bobby Cremins said Collier "was a happy-go-lucky kid."

"He married an Atlanta girl and adopted Atlanta as his hometown," Cremins said. "He came back and got his degree, which I was very proud of."

Collier started 44 games last season for Atlanta, averaging 5.7 points and 2.6 rebounds in 13.5 minutes. With the addition of Zaza Pachulia, Collier was not projected as a starter this season but was viewed as a top backup. In two preseason games, Collier averaged 3.5 points and 3.0 rebounds.

Collier was drafted by Milwaukee in 2000 in the first round, the 15th pick overall, and was traded to Houston.

Jeff Collier said Jason had been married to Katie for four years and had a 1-year-old daughter, Elezan.

The elder Collier played at Georgia Tech from 1972-76 and said his son initially decided to wear the same No. 52 he did at Tech.

"He was a beautiful kid," Collier said. "Everybody he touched liked him. He played basketball from the time he was in the fourth grade until now. I don't think the kid was ever in a fight or an altercation."

Funeral arrangements are incomplete but the family plans a private viewing.

"Jason didn't really care to be a spectacle," his father said. "He would have wanted this to be a quiet thing. Instead of people being grim, he wants them laughing."

Information from The Associated Press was used in this report.

Kaufman
10-16-2005, 05:06 AM
Its sad.

All I can remember of him was passing by him on the 1st floor of the main library back fall 1995 (or 1996, as it might have been) in Bloomington. It was in the big audiovisual room with all the desks for reading, for those of you who might remember. He always had a few tutors with him. It'd kinda make you giggle. I remember he often wore a gray hooded sweatshirt. And he was a quiet guy. Kept to himself. Looked a bit naive and you could see the soft kid underneath the huge 7'0 exterior.

My memory of Jason Collier.

Harmonica
10-16-2005, 10:22 AM
Jason Collier died at 28. Keith Richards, against all odds, is 61. Try to make sense of that. Let me know if you ever do.

Um, it's called genetics, dumbass. It appears Collier got screwed in that department.

Los Angeles
10-17-2005, 01:46 AM
This article has a few new bits and also a few comments from Baby Al:

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http://sports.espn.go.com/nba/trainingcamp05/columns/story?columnist=hollinger_john&id=2193307

Mourning Hawks begin life without 'our brother'

By John Hollinger
ESPN Insider
Archive

ATLANTA -- Mike Woodson has faced many challenges in his lengthy career as a player and coach, but nothing has prepared him for this.

In the wake of center Jason Collier's death, it's up to the Hawks coach to steer the team through its grief yet still get his players to produce on the basketball court.

"I've never experienced anything like it in 23 years in basketball," said Woodson on Sunday. "Nobody expected this, but as a coach, I've got to help these guys get though it."

That job doesn't end after Collier's funeral on Wednesday -- in fact, it's only beginning. The death will hang over Woodson's team the entire season. The memory will be there at every practice and home game as they walk by Collier's empty locker. And if they try to forget, they'll be asked to remember at every road stop, as a new group of reporters shows up to ask the same questions about their fallen teammate.

For Atlanta, the jolt comes just as the franchise was hoping to emerge from several years of malaise. The Hawks were a wreck last season, winning only 13 games in front of a largely empty arena while waiting for the healing power of free agent dollars and high draft picks to take hold. But this year's training camp brought a fountain of optimism. With the offseason additions of Joe Johnson, Zaza Pachulia and Marvin Williams, and the ouster of impeding part-owner Steve Belkin, Atlanta began camp with as much hope as it had in years.

The sense of optimism that pervaded the opening weeks of camp is long gone now. Woodson has to replace that gloom, or at least find an outlet for it, and his first step was to run the team through a two-and-a-half hour practice on Sunday -- about an hour longer than his norm. He described the mood as "upbeat, considering the situation."

But while getting back on the court after yesterday's practice was canceled helped get the team back into a routine, the players were still shell-shocked by the news.

"I was getting ready to go to practice and got a phone call from [assistant] coach [David] Fizdale. I didn't know how to react. It's something I never had to go through," said swingman Josh Childress.

The Hawks' backup center, Collier was an anomaly in the Hawks' locker room. He was a five-year vet on a roster containing nine players with two years experience or less. And his bass-fishing, country-living ways (he lived on a lake about an hour's drive from Philips Arena) stood in marked contrast to those of his younger, more citified teammates.

Nonetheless, his easygoing nature won him many friends, especially forward Al Harrington. The 6-9 forward shared a corner of the locker room with Collier and said he was dedicating his season to him.

"He was a very funny guy, always positive. Nothing ever got to him," said Harrington. "[The public] wouldn't think it was the case, but we spent so much time together it really was like he was our brother."

And as a longtime Atlanta resident on a team full of recent transplants -- no other Hawk had been on the team more than a year -- he was also a prime source for information and advice about life in the Peach State. In fact, that's my last memory of Collier -- giving directions to a training camp signee trying to get somewhere after Atlanta's preseason game against Orlando on Tuesday.

Now it's up to Woodson to give the directions, in the figurative sense. Sadly, one of the players who would have been most helpful in that pursuit is now gone.

"He was an ultimate pro," said Woodson of Collier. "He did everything I asked from a coaching standpoint."

Woodson has to replace Collier on the court as well. He started 44 games last season, averaging 13 minutes per game, and figured to play a similar amount this year as Zaza Pachulia's primary backup at center. The southpaw was Atlanta's best shooting big man and was especially effective on pick-and-pop plays. Filling that void will be either Uruguayan rookie Esteban Batista or second-year pro John Edwards, but neither offers the combination of size and skill that Collier did.

Overall, no coach will face a tougher challenge this season than Woodson. Not only does he have to resuscitate a 13-win team with a moribund fan base, one that now is desperately short of big men, but he must do so while playing grief counselor on the side and navigating the team through constant reminders of its loss.

"That's my job," Woodson said bravely on Sunday, but one has to think this never showed up in the description of his duties.

John Hollinger writes for ESPN Insider.

Moses
10-17-2005, 11:24 PM
It's extremely unfortunate..Nobody deserves to die this young.

Prayers to his family and friends.

GO!!!!!
10-17-2005, 11:39 PM
My condolences

Stryder
10-18-2005, 12:49 AM
Um, it's called genetics, dumbass. It appears Collier got screwed in that department.

It's called Life.

Life isn't fair. That is the beauty of it.

Hicks
10-18-2005, 12:53 AM
Life isn't fair. That is the beauty of it.

:rolleyes:

Stryder
10-18-2005, 12:57 AM
:rolleyes:

What is the eye rolling for?

I find beauty in the randomness of life. So?

Harmonica
10-18-2005, 02:01 AM
It's called Life.

Life isn't fair. That is the beauty of it.

Yeah, but then you're resorting to the same kind of platitudinous philosophical BS the writer of that article is. Sure life isn't fair, but fairness has nothing to do with it. It's about genetics with regard to his silly remark, not some grander statement about life.

Kaufman
10-18-2005, 04:51 PM
Basically these are complicated issues.

At such a young age, barring drugs/alcohol, genetics are likely to have contributed to Collier's death. The other important thing to think about here is that he might have had a blood clot which got "thrown" to the lungs. Blood clots in young ppl like Jason are more likely to be a case of congenital defect. I guess we'll find out more tomorrow, or whenever the autopsy results are released.

Harmonica
10-18-2005, 08:44 PM
Basically these are complicated issues.

At such a young age, barring drugs/alcohol, genetics are likely to have contributed to Collier's death. The other important thing to think about here is that he might have had a blood clot which got "thrown" to the lungs. Blood clots in young ppl like Jason are more likely to be a case of congenital defect. I guess we'll find out more tomorrow, or whenever the autopsy results are released.
Even if it was drug or alcohol related, with regard to the Keith Richards reference, genetics would still factor into it when making a comparison between the two, as the writer of that article did. Richards did drugs, especially heroin, in excess. His body obviously was able to withstand a prolonged addiction and abuse of various drugs. How is one person able to do cocaine or heroin, for example, for many years, while another person does it one time and dies? Genetics. Yes, you could say the addict builds up a tolerance, but two first-time users can take the same dose of the same drug at the same time and have very different reactions.

Kaufman
10-18-2005, 10:56 PM
Harmonica, with no sarcasm, are you a geneticist?

What you bring up, its true to an extent. But the environment plays a role in life as well - genetics may make us predisposed to something but the environment will shape how our genotype/phenotype is expressed. For instance, you bring up two first time drug users. Well there are a few things that can effect how those two bodies react. For instance, LSD, lysergic acid diethylamide. Lets say one user has drank a huge glass of milk before hand. The other has not. The milk will neutralize the acidity of LSD, and thereby inactivating it.

Lets take a cocaine user. Cocaine is a stimulant. It stimulates the sympathetic nervous system. Amongst other things, the sympathetic nervous system is composed of alpha and beta adrenergic pathways. Lets say one guy is taking a beta blocker (such as metoprolol, Toprol XL, carvedilol) and the other guy is not. Well the guy taking the beta blocker is going to have an unopposed alpha stimulation and have a much worse reaction than the guy not taking the beta blocker.

Basically, you can't discount the environment shaping outcomes. Genetics might predispose someone, but there are other factors.

Harmonica
10-18-2005, 11:38 PM
Harmonica, with no sarcasm, are you a geneticist?

What you bring up, its true to an extent. But the environment plays a role in life as well - genetics may make us predisposed to something but the environment will shape how our genotype/phenotype is expressed. For instance, you bring up two first time drug users. Well there are a few things that can effect how those two bodies react. For instance, LSD, lysergic acid diethylamide. Lets say one user has drank a huge glass of milk before hand. The other has not. The milk will neutralize the acidity of LSD, and thereby inactivating it.

Lets take a cocaine user. Cocaine is a stimulant. It stimulates the sympathetic nervous system. Amongst other things, the sympathetic nervous system is composed of alpha and beta adrenergic pathways. Lets say one guy is taking a beta blocker (such as metoprolol, Toprol XL, carvedilol) and the other guy is not. Well the guy taking the beta blocker is going to have an unopposed alpha stimulation and have a much worse reaction than the guy not taking the beta blocker.

Basically, you can't discount the environment shaping outcomes. Genetics might predispose someone, but there are other factors.

Kaufman, with no sarcasm intended, are you or have you ever been a heroin or cocaine user?

Okay, I was being sarcastic.

Forget the beta blockers. Of course the guy taking the beta blocker is more likely to have a worse reaction than the guy not taking the beta blocker. That would indicate that the person taking them is doing so for an existing condition which would put him at a higher risk of an adverse reaction to either drug. And whether someone has a glass of milk or not before they indulge in cocaine or heroin is going to have very little impact on their reaction to either drug as compared to the person's genetic predisposition. That's not to dismiss other factors, but you're taking this discussion in an entirely different direction. I'm simply responding to that writer's idiotic comparison between Richards and Collier.

Kaufman
10-19-2005, 12:00 AM
I was just facinated at your interest in genetics.

I deal with cocaine probably once to twice a week. But its in the form of the patients I'm caring for.

I hear ya on the Richards article. I didn't fully read it, but to my credit I did read bits and pieces.

I'm not totally sure what the point you are trying to make is, but I trust it's a good one and I'm probably just lost. It happens sometimes...

Harmonica
10-19-2005, 12:25 AM
I was just facinated at your interest in genetics.

I deal with cocaine probably once to twice a week. But its in the form of the patients I'm caring for.

I hear ya on the Richards article. I didn't fully read it, but to my credit I did read bits and pieces.

I'm not totally sure what the point you are trying to make is, but I trust it's a good one and I'm probably just lost. It happens sometimes...

The writer of that article concluded his piece by saying: "Jason Collier died at 28. Keith Richards, against all odds, is 61. Try to make sense of that. Let me know if you ever do."

I just found that to be an inane remark. I had no point really except that.

Kaufman
10-19-2005, 12:52 AM
I agree. People try to make cutesy statements in articles but they really have no clue exactly what they are saying or insinuating sometimes. I went back and read the article just now. Collier and Richards have nothing to do with one another, the writer drew a comparision bc Richards is having a show sometime soon in Philips. Kinda a weird way to write an article.

Kaufman
10-31-2005, 11:48 PM
http://sports.espn.go.com/nba/news/story?id=2209788

Autopsy reveals Hawks' Collier had heart problemAssociated Press


ATLANTA -- Investigators suspect Atlanta Hawks center Jason Collier died of a heart problem and will announce their findings Tuesday.

The 28-year-old player died Oct. 15 after he had trouble breathing in his Georgia home.

The autopsy was conducted by the Georgia Bureau of Investigation. GBI spokesman John Bankhead says the office performs all Forsyth County autopsies, and Bankhead said this autopsy showed the cause of death to be "heart-related."

The corner's office announced a news conference for Tuesday.

"It's a heart abnormality," said Collier's agent, Richard Howell. "It certainly appears to be that. Signs point to that."