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Kat
10-03-2005, 12:54 PM
I just got booted from my secretarial temp position. I'd applied for the permanent position and didn't even get an *interview* because I didn't have enough experience. Heck, my resume didn't even get to my supervisor because Human Resources weeded it out for lack of experience.

They wanted someone with a high school diploma/GED and two years secretarial experience. They specifically stated "an equivalent combination of related education and experience will be considered." I have a bachelor's degree (in psychology) and one year experience. And yet I was weeded out.

Nevermind the fact that I'm doing the job well as we speak. Nevermind the fact that all the people I work for are satisfied with my performance (according to my supervisor). Nevermind the fact that one of the people I'm working for actually came down to my office on Friday to try to convince me to put in an application for this position because he and several other people were happy with my work. Nevermind that I told everyone that asked, including my supervisor, that I had applied for this position and wanted it.

I have a friggin' bachelor's degree and can't work as a secretary. Does that seem right to you?

Frank Slade
10-03-2005, 12:58 PM
What ? not at all.
Is this a case of someone else is already "hand picked" for the spot.?
Otherwise this does not make any sense at all. Especially not even to do an interview.

Kat
10-03-2005, 01:00 PM
What ? not at all.
Is this a case of someone else is already "hand picked" for the spot.?
Otherwise this does not make any sense at all. Especially not even to do an interview.

As far as I can tell, no. This position has been open for over three months. There were two temps here before me. I have a hard time believing the position would've been open so long if they had someone in mind for it all along.

Frank Slade
10-03-2005, 01:09 PM
As far as I can tell, no. This position has been open for over three months. There were two temps here before me. I have a hard time believing the position would've been open so long if they had someone in mind for it all along.

Right that would not make sense. It seems like there is more to this than meets than eye. Perhaps a good "word" from your Supervisor , or the other people you work for to HR may enlighten them to reconsider?

Otherwise it seems someone is clueless as who cares about another year of outside experience when you have direct experience doing the exact job they are trying to fill. Not to mention the man hours they lose training someone new ...

McClintic Sphere
10-03-2005, 01:15 PM
Wait, so you got booted from the temp position because you applied for the permanent position????

Harmonica
10-03-2005, 01:17 PM
I have a friggin' bachelor's degree and can't work as a secretary. Does that seem right to you?
Well, a couple of things. First, it may be something other than your work experience or educational background. And secondly, if I was your prospective employer, the fact that you have a bachelor's degree would be an indication to me that you probably won't be satisfied doing secretarial work for too long. I would think you're either doing it until you find something better or you're settling.

Knucklehead Warrior
10-03-2005, 01:29 PM
I've seen this happen before. My thought is that they already had someone in mind for the job, but encouraged you to apply so that it "looked good".

Let's also not overlook that you just might not be the right sex (yeah, even for a secretarial job), color (yep of course it still happens), age, religion, or even marital status to keep their numbers even. Are you overweight? Do you have any medical problems they might be aware of?

And just as likely is the fact that you have a Bachelor's degree. They may assume you're overqualified. They may assume you won't be happy in a year and will move on. I have observed this happening on several occasions. Candidate A is obviously more qualified, but they try to match the intelligence of the position to that of the candidate, so they go with the less intelligent and less capable candidate B. It does happen.

I am certain I have gotten the majority of the positions I've had because I either knew someone or whoever did the hiring just clicked with me, or both. Aim a little higher and get your friends involved.

Kat
10-03-2005, 02:09 PM
Right that would not make sense. It seems like there is more to this than meets than eye. Perhaps a good "word" from your Supervisor , or the other people you work for to HR may enlighten them to reconsider?

Otherwise it seems someone is clueless as who cares about another year of outside experience when you have direct experience doing the exact job they are trying to fill. Not to mention the man hours they lose training someone new ...

I appreciate your sympathy. I don't think there's any point in trying to get my supervisor to reconsider. Another person's already been hired. That's another crappy part of this. Even though I expressed interest in the position, and enquired a few times, no one told me that they'd even progressed to interviews. I was just told out of the blue today that they'd hired someone.

So no matter what I say, or someone says on my behalf, it won't change the fact that someone else is getting this job.

Kat
10-03-2005, 02:11 PM
Wait, so you got booted from the temp position because you applied for the permanent position????

No, no. My temp position is ending because they've hired someone for the permanent position. I'm bothered more by the fact that I didn't get an interview (or was even informed that interviews were occurring). I wasn't even given a fair chance at getting the permanent position.

Kat
10-03-2005, 02:14 PM
Well, a couple of things. First, it may be something other than your work experience or educational background. And secondly, if I was your prospective employer, the fact that you have a bachelor's degree would be an indication to me that you probably won't be satisfied doing secretarial work for too long. I would think you're either doing it until you find something better or you're settling.

I can't really speculate on the first point. If there's something in there that turned them off, I don't have a clue what it would be. As for your second point, I think that's something to be addressed by an interview. Rather than assume I'm settling or looking for something better, why not ask? The fact is, I wanted this job so I could go back to school part-time. I would get tuition reimbursement and a flexible schedule. And I would be here until I graduate, at least two and a half years from now. But I wasn't even given the opportunity to explain that.

Kat
10-03-2005, 02:22 PM
I've seen this happen before. My thought is that they already had someone in mind for the job, but encouraged you to apply so that it "looked good".

Let's also not overlook that you just might not be the right sex (yeah, even for a secretarial job), color (yep of course it still happens), age, religion, or even marital status to keep their numbers even. Are you overweight? Do you have any medical problems they might be aware of?

And just as likely is the fact that you have a Bachelor's degree. They may assume you're overqualified. They may assume you won't be happy in a year and will move on. I have observed this happening on several occasions. Candidate A is obviously more qualified, but they try to match the intelligence of the position to that of the candidate, so they go with the less intelligent and less capable candidate B. It does happen.

I am certain I have gotten the majority of the positions I've had because I either knew someone or whoever did the hiring just clicked with me, or both. Aim a little higher and get your friends involved.

I'll be meeting my replacement this afternoon. I'm willing to bet it'll be a white woman. She may or may not be married, and she'll probably be older, but I doubt she's filling a quota of some sort. I'm not overweight and I don't have any medical problems that would hurt my candidacy either.

I *really* hate the idea that it might be my bachelor's degree that hurt me here. I have a perfectly legitimate reason for wanting this position, overqualified or not. And quite frankly, a bachelor's degree in psychology doesn't exactly *qualify* me for much either. *begins muttering obscenities*

Frankly, I'm not looking to aim a little higher, because I want to go back to school. I don't want something that stresses me out and/or requires work outside normal business hours. As far as getting friends involved, I don't have any friends in any position to help. :shrug:

DrBadd01
10-03-2005, 02:42 PM
I know exactly how you feel. I have been looking for a job for since I graduated with my BA in may and so far have gotten nothing. Like you I have also applied for secretarial jobs, and other jobs that don't require a bachelors degree. I get really frustrated because I put a lot of hard work into my BA and it could be the reason I am still looking. Since when was it right to penalize someone for getting a education?

travmil
10-03-2005, 03:31 PM
My wife has a BS in Physics. Her student loans are already high so she doesn't want to take on any more to further advance her degree. There is absolutely zero chance of her getting a job in her field with only a BS. In order to do research, you need a PhD in Physics, not just a BS. In order for her to teach Physics at the University level she would need a Master's, and even then a PhD helps. She could get a teacher's certificate and teach at the High School level since she minored in Education. But a first year's teacher salary doesn't exactly pay off the student loans now does it? Her advisor made it seem like she'd have no trouble landing a job. She didn't find out until after she graduated that her advisor had assumed she would be getting more than a BS. She applied for a job at the Fermi National Laboratory in Chicago. It's basically a huge lab that does a lot of things realated to Physics and research. She was told that the only job she was qualified for there was a particle accelerator operator, and you can train a monkey to do that. That job also has a weird shift, like factory work, because the accelerator runs 24/7. She basically had to "settle" for a lab technician's job at a local lab, and really she even had trouble landing that. They kept telling her that her degree wasn't exactly what they were looking for. She finally had to literally beg the HR manager there to give her a shot. And even then the manager told her that in six months they would "re-evaluate" the situation and see if it's working out. Her six month date is rapidly approaching and she has literally worked like a slave in that time. She's done eveything they have asked, taken every training course they've thrown at her, and worked more overtime than should be allowed by law. The HR manager won't talk to her about her situation, which leads me to believe that they are going to take this opportunity to can her. In her case, unfortunately, getting her degree has served only her sense of pride and accomplishment, and not much else.

Everything she has gone through makes me thankful for my job. I didn't go to college, and I had to work in some crappy, low-paying positions to gain the experience necessary to get my job. It took me a while (7 years), but I'm where I want to be, I have no student loans, have good job security, and good potential to move up over the course of my career.

It's strange how it's worked out for both of us. If you were to examine our situations from the outside, you would come to the conclusion that she has the better job, and is the main breadwinner. I've seen wnough situations like ours to know though that it's not at all uncommon.

Hicks
10-04-2005, 09:59 PM
I just got booted from my secretarial temp position. I'd applied for the permanent position and didn't even get an *interview* because I didn't have enough experience. Heck, my resume didn't even get to my supervisor because Human Resources weeded it out for lack of experience.

They wanted someone with a high school diploma/GED and two years secretarial experience. They specifically stated "an equivalent combination of related education and experience will be considered." I have a bachelor's degree (in psychology) and one year experience. And yet I was weeded out.

Nevermind the fact that I'm doing the job well as we speak. Nevermind the fact that all the people I work for are satisfied with my performance (according to my supervisor). Nevermind the fact that one of the people I'm working for actually came down to my office on Friday to try to convince me to put in an application for this position because he and several other people were happy with my work. Nevermind that I told everyone that asked, including my supervisor, that I had applied for this position and wanted it.

I have a friggin' bachelor's degree and can't work as a secretary. Does that seem right to you?

I just saw this. That is a load of bullshi!t. Total bull****. **** them.

That's unbelievable.

Hicks
10-04-2005, 10:01 PM
Anyway, I wish you the best finding work with more deserving people than those *******s.

Kat
10-05-2005, 09:17 AM
Anyway, I wish you the best finding work with more deserving people than those *******s.

Thanks, Mark.

I'm just trying to comfort myself by telling myself that I wouldn't want to work for such a ***** of a supervisor and that this leaves the door open for finding work that's more interesting (since this job would never be more than a paycheck). But this throws a serious monkey wrench in my educational plans for the moment. I do have three months to figure something else out, though.

Harmonica
10-05-2005, 12:51 PM
Thanks, Mark.

I'm just trying to comfort myself by telling myself that I wouldn't want to work for such a ***** of a supervisor and that this leaves the door open for finding work that's more interesting (since this job would never be more than a paycheck). But this throws a serious monkey wrench in my educational plans for the moment. I do have three months to figure something else out, though.
I think that about says it all right there. Perhaps your employer sensed this as well. In the end though, only your supervisor really knows why you didn't get the opportunity to interview for that position. I'd ask him/her in a very diplomatic manner why you weren't considered. That question tends to catch most people off guard and put them on their heels, but you may learn something about yourself if they're honest. Or you may find that it had nothing to do with you at all. Regardless, try not to let it get you down too much.

Diamond Dave
10-05-2005, 01:09 PM
Ah this reminds me of that degree thread I started this summer.

Kat, I hope things work out. I understand whole heartedly about the feeling the need for retribution for all the hard work that goes into a BS. Lately I've started to learn the importance of connections, I believe it is how anyone gets anywhere.

I'm still working on my degree in public relations, in the meantime I picked up a job in radio sales/production. Not because I needed it, as a matter of fact I am losing a substantial amount of money doing it, but I needed the experience.

I hope my degree works out, but it seems like everyday I prepare myself that my work at college is in vain. I guess its just a "life isn't fair" problem, and pure uninhibited luck will control who comes out ahead.

Harmonica
10-05-2005, 01:24 PM
I'm still working on my degree in public relations, in the meantime I picked up a job in radio sales/production. Not because I needed it, as a matter of fact I am losing a substantial amount of money doing it, but I needed the experience.
Good for you, man. That's the right attitude. That'll look good on your resumé and it shows initiative. Plus you'll make some connections. Next stop, Pacers internship in media relations. ;)

SycamoreKen
10-06-2005, 06:54 AM
My wife has a BS in Physics. Her student loans are already high so she doesn't want to take on any more to further advance her degree. There is absolutely zero chance of her getting a job in her field with only a BS. In order to do research, you need a PhD in Physics, not just a BS. In order for her to teach Physics at the University level she would need a Master's, and even then a PhD helps. She could get a teacher's certificate and teach at the High School level since she minored in Education. But a first year's teacher salary doesn't exactly pay off the student loans now does it? Her advisor made it seem like she'd have no trouble landing a job. She didn't find out until after she graduated that her advisor had assumed she would be getting more than a BS. She applied for a job at the Fermi National Laboratory in Chicago. It's basically a huge lab that does a lot of things realated to Physics and research. She was told that the only job she was qualified for there was a particle accelerator operator, and you can train a monkey to do that. That job also has a weird shift, like factory work, because the accelerator runs 24/7. She basically had to "settle" for a lab technician's job at a local lab, and really she even had trouble landing that. They kept telling her that her degree wasn't exactly what they were looking for. She finally had to literally beg the HR manager there to give her a shot. And even then the manager told her that in six months they would "re-evaluate" the situation and see if it's working out. Her six month date is rapidly approaching and she has literally worked like a slave in that time. She's done eveything they have asked, taken every training course they've thrown at her, and worked more overtime than should be allowed by law. The HR manager won't talk to her about her situation, which leads me to believe that they are going to take this opportunity to can her. In her case, unfortunately, getting her degree has served only her sense of pride and accomplishment, and not much else.

Everything she has gone through makes me thankful for my job. I didn't go to college, and I had to work in some crappy, low-paying positions to gain the experience necessary to get my job. It took me a while (7 years), but I'm where I want to be, I have no student loans, have good job security, and good potential to move up over the course of my career.

It's strange how it's worked out for both of us. If you were to examine our situations from the outside, you would come to the conclusion that she has the better job, and is the main breadwinner. I've seen wnough situations like ours to know though that it's not at all uncommon.

Trav,

Since your wife would teach in an area of high demand, science, she would probably be eligible for forgiveness on at least part of her loans. If she couples the high need catagory with teaching in a low income school, the chances go up even more. I had part of my loan balance eliminated this way. It just depends on the loan. Of course, if she goes back to school the loan payments can be deferred until she finishes.

Kat,

Sorry about your job situation. I'm sure you'll find something better.

Knucklehead Warrior
10-06-2005, 11:43 AM
I hope my degree works out, but it seems like everyday I prepare myself that my work at college is in vain. I guess its just a "life isn't fair" problem, and pure uninhibited luck will control who comes out ahead.
Doggonit. I wish this wasn't true, but my experience proves otherwise. It's not just luck though. What we're seeing here is that a college degree doesn't automatically get you anything except opening some doors. There is still more to it. I am utterly convinced that who you know and what you can get them to do for you is just as important as what you know.

My last 4 jobs I got because I made myself visible to the people making the employment decision and to their bosses, essential to their work, and a profit center for their operations. I made it easy to choose me and difficult to explain if they didn't.

I have seen incompetent morons be just as successful in the same area of work as people who were geniuses. Some had very good people skills -- schmoozers. Most bosses have biases it seems. There's a lot of politics in working for corporate america. Those who understand this and can make it work for them can do better even than those who have high academic skills.

Get past that frustration and make things work FOR YOU. I could do it for some of the time, but eventually it's one of the reasons I just said the hell with it and retired. There are just too many places to work where initiative and brains are bad words and fluff is more rewarded than substance.

Thanks, I feel much better now.

Diamond Dave
10-07-2005, 08:24 PM
Good for you, man. That's the right attitude. That'll look good on your resumé and it shows initiative. Plus you'll make some connections. Next stop, Pacers internship in media relations. ;)

Yeah, I took your advice to heart. This will definitely help me in the future.

But until further notice I'm blaming you for my financial difficulties. ;)

Kat
10-08-2005, 01:56 PM
I finally figured out exactly why Human Resources weeded me out. Although many job postings state "an equivalent combination of "related" education and experience will be considered," this is not exactly the case. Experience can be substituted for education, but education cannot be substituted for experience. From their HR website:

"To be considered a qualified applicant for a position that includes the equivalent statement, you must hold the necessary experience related to the position.

Example #1:

Position Title: Project Manager

Position Requirements: Bachelor’s degree and 2 years of project management experience required.

* An Associate's degree and 4 years of project management experience.
* A High School Diploma / GED and 6 years of project management experience."

So... experience is held in greater esteem than education. Which I can't necessarily disagree with, in principle. But this is a university. Ain't it very hypocritical for them to take such a stance? Gee, Purdue University, I'm sorry that I attended your institution in favor of working these last few years. I guess I'll start filling out entry-level grocery clerk applications now.... *sigh*

Harmonica
10-08-2005, 02:42 PM
Since your wife would teach in an area of high demand, science, she would probably be eligible for forgiveness on at least part of her loans. If she couples the high need catagory with teaching in a low income school, the chances go up even more. I had part of my loan balance eliminated this way. It just depends on the loan.
Who pays for that?

Harmonica
10-08-2005, 02:49 PM
Yeah, I took your advice to heart. This will definitely help me in the future.

But until further notice I'm blaming you for my financial difficulties. ;)
You wanna swap debt? You're doing what I've always done—invest in yourself. Trust me, you're gonna feel awful damn good about yourself for having made the sacrifice and coming out on the other side. The rewards are all the more satisfying. Just remember it's not necessarily a one-time thing.

sweabs
10-08-2005, 03:53 PM
So true - it's the big picture that counts.

I've heard way too many stories of people who got their degree, but didn't have the experience necessary to get into teachers college. Or, those who graduated teachers college but didn't have enough prior experience to get hired.

I've known I want to become a teacher since grade 6 - and worked towards achieving that goal since the age of 13. It's all about experience - you need to start early and look towards the big picture. I started out with babysitting, then moved on to coaching. Then moved onto summer camps. Now I have a supervisory job. Not to mention I've been volunteering my time in classrooms and local museums for 6 years now.

Heck, the city pays me close to minimum wage even though I've been working for them for 7 years...while I have friends laughing at me, working at factories during the summer making $25/hour. And volunteering at the museum sure isn't making me any money. But in the end, this is all going to pay off (and I still think I have the best job(s) in the world).

SycamoreKen
10-08-2005, 10:51 PM
Who pays for that?

Since it is/was a federal loan, I can't remember which one, I guess we all do. I didn't get all of my loans reduced/forgiven, just one. The others we combined for a lower interest rate and are paying off.

Harmonica
10-08-2005, 11:54 PM
Since it is/was a federal loan, I can't remember which one, I guess we all do. I didn't get all of my loans reduced/forgiven, just one. The others we combined for a lower interest rate and are paying off.
Yeah, can't say I really like that. No one's gonna forgive the debts I incurred investing in my career, which came out of my own pocket. And then on top of that, I have to pay for yours. :tongue:

Stryder
10-09-2005, 12:19 AM
Having gone through the "just graduated and looked for a job" process rather recently, I'll say this:

A college degree means as much now as a high school diploma 20 years ago. It's nice to have, but everyone gets one and doesn't mean much,


Really, it depends on what the degree is and what type of work you are doing or want to do...

Arcadian
10-09-2005, 12:20 AM
The program I am familliar with is $5,000 after a teacher has served five years in a low income (title 9) school. In some cases I believe lenders take part but I don't know if the feds pay them back. It is done mostly because the turnover is high for those schools.

I guess it is because teaching is consider alturistic, the government is the employeer and the client base, the children, suffer the most under the turnover.

Harmonica
10-09-2005, 02:25 AM
I guess it is because teaching is consider alturistic, the government is the employeer and the client base, the children, suffer the most under the turnover.
This isn't directed at you, Arcadian, but at the idea of it: :rolleyes:

Arcadian
10-09-2005, 02:32 AM
I realized that it wouldn't make you like it anymore.

It is just the reality of it. Just like most parents don't want to send their children to LA schools teachers don't want to teach in them. It might not be the best way but there aren't a lot of solutions for lower income schools.

Raskolnikov
10-09-2005, 10:26 AM
My wife has a BS in Physics. Her student loans are already high so she doesn't want to take on any more to further advance her degree. There is absolutely zero chance of her getting a job in her field with only a BS. In order to do research, you need a PhD in Physics, not just a BS. In order for her to teach Physics at the University level she would need a Master's, and even then a PhD helps. She could get a teacher's certificate and teach at the High School level since she minored in Education. But a first year's teacher salary doesn't exactly pay off the student loans now does it? Her advisor made it seem like she'd have no trouble landing a job. She didn't find out until after she graduated that her advisor had assumed she would be getting more than a BS. She applied for a job at the Fermi National Laboratory in Chicago. It's basically a huge lab that does a lot of things realated to Physics and research. She was told that the only job she was qualified for there was a particle accelerator operator, and you can train a monkey to do that. That job also has a weird shift, like factory work, because the accelerator runs 24/7. She basically had to "settle" for a lab technician's job at a local lab, and really she even had trouble landing that. They kept telling her that her degree wasn't exactly what they were looking for. She finally had to literally beg the HR manager there to give her a shot. And even then the manager told her that in six months they would "re-evaluate" the situation and see if it's working out. Her six month date is rapidly approaching and she has literally worked like a slave in that time. She's done eveything they have asked, taken every training course they've thrown at her, and worked more overtime than should be allowed by law. The HR manager won't talk to her about her situation, which leads me to believe that they are going to take this opportunity to can her. In her case, unfortunately, getting her degree has served only her sense of pride and accomplishment, and not much else.

Everything she has gone through makes me thankful for my job. I didn't go to college, and I had to work in some crappy, low-paying positions to gain the experience necessary to get my job. It took me a while (7 years), but I'm where I want to be, I have no student loans, have good job security, and good potential to move up over the course of my career.

It's strange how it's worked out for both of us. If you were to examine our situations from the outside, you would come to the conclusion that she has the better job, and is the main breadwinner. I've seen wnough situations like ours to know though that it's not at all uncommon.

thanks for sharing your story, travmil

i m a last year university physics student and i m a bit afraid the things that happened to your wife are going to happen to me as well

indeed, the word on the (belgian) physics street totally confirms what you re saying : if you really want to go on in physics research you either have to be a very, very gifted person or you have to be a more than average student AND work your *** off (that is not do much other things than physics). Neither of the cases can be applied to me : i m certainly not the new Einstein/Newton/... and i would like to do other things in my life than physics.

in belgium there something similar as a Phd and it s rather impossible to have a job related to physics research when you don t get that. so my thoughts regarding finding a decent job are still rather uncertain.

another i ve heard is that people who have studied physics/mathemathics sometimes get to work in a bank for they have been thought how to think logically. but that s mostly not what they expected to do of course...

wish your wife good luck in future job searches. there are certainly many of us (we re with 20 students that are graduating this year) that will be in the same situation as her

best regards and go pacers!,

Raskolnikov

SycamoreKen
10-09-2005, 10:07 PM
The program I am familliar with is $5,000 after a teacher has served five years in a low income (title 9) school. In some cases I believe lenders take part but I don't know if the feds pay them back. It is done mostly because the turnover is high for those schools.

I guess it is because teaching is consider alturistic, the government is the employeer and the client base, the children, suffer the most under the turnover.

That isn't what I got, so that must be a state program. Mine took 3 years to complete and it went half, half, all. I was only about $1,000 of what I owe, so it wasn't close to everything.

I can understand Harmonica's not liking the idea of wanting to give an economic incentive to teachers. Why would we want to attract qualified and dedicated teachers to our poorest schools? We all know its much better to let the kids go nowhere and pay them 10 times as much in welfare payments for the rest of their lives.

brichard
10-10-2005, 12:02 AM
I just got booted from my secretarial temp position. I'd applied for the permanent position and didn't even get an *interview* because I didn't have enough experience. Heck, my resume didn't even get to my supervisor because Human Resources weeded it out for lack of experience.

They wanted someone with a high school diploma/GED and two years secretarial experience. They specifically stated "an equivalent combination of related education and experience will be considered." I have a bachelor's degree (in psychology) and one year experience. And yet I was weeded out.

Nevermind the fact that I'm doing the job well as we speak. Nevermind the fact that all the people I work for are satisfied with my performance (according to my supervisor). Nevermind the fact that one of the people I'm working for actually came down to my office on Friday to try to convince me to put in an application for this position because he and several other people were happy with my work. Nevermind that I told everyone that asked, including my supervisor, that I had applied for this position and wanted it.

I have a friggin' bachelor's degree and can't work as a secretary. Does that seem right to you?

I just wanted to tell you that I was in the temp industry for awhile in Indy (Thank God I'm out!) and it was very difficult to find good secretarial people. If you had a heartbeat and showed up for work everyday you would have outdistanced about 95% of the people I saw walk through the door.

Sorry it worked out like it did, but it is better to get out of a foul situation at the beginning rather than hang around for awhile. Some companies just suck, ya' know? :)

Good Luck with your next opportunity!