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Harmonica
04-14-2005, 03:26 PM
It doesn't sound good. The dizzyness and lightheadedness is disconcerting and not a good sign. I've done a lot of research on irregular heartbeats because I have an episodic benign condition and anytime an irregular heartbeat is accompanied by fainting or dizzyness, there is especially cause for concern. Hope the kid is okay.

ChicagoJ
04-14-2005, 03:28 PM
I thought we already knew this? I swear I read this in the print edition of the Tribune while standing in line at Corner Bakery last week. It was the same day that we found out Juwaan Howard was out, the articles were on facing pages.

Or perhaps the rest of the country is just now figuring it out...

The Bulls aren't very good at keeping secrets.

Harmonica
04-14-2005, 03:30 PM
I thought we already knew this?

Or perhaps the rest of the country is just now figuring it out...

The Bulls aren't very good at keeping secrets.

I think this is the first announcement that he is out for the remainder of the season, including the playoffs.

ChicagoJ
04-14-2005, 03:34 PM
The Tribune doesn't keep much of an archive, but based on this article from a week ago, I was assuming he was done for the year.

http://chicagosports.chicagotribune.com/sports/basketball/bulls/cs-050407curry,1,3033362.story?coll=cs-bulls-headlines


EDIT - because its about to disappear off the archives, here it is...

I guess they didn't officially rule him out of the playoffs then, but I thought the tone of this was clear that they were not optimistic.

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/sports/basketball/bulls/cs-050407curry,1,3033362.story?coll=cs-bulls-headlines (http://chicagosports.chicagotribune.com/sports/basketball/bulls/cs-050407curry,1,3033362.story?coll=cs-bulls-headlines)

Bulls may end season without Curry
Further tests set for irregular heartbeat
By K.C. Johnson
Tribune staff reporter

April 7, 2005, 10:10 PM CDT

ORLANDO -- Caution and concern have replaced the early optimism that characterized the Bulls' reaction to Eddy Curry's irregular heartbeat.

The Bulls released a statement Thursday saying results from tests performed over the last week had been inconclusive and Curry would undergo further evaluation by specialists in Boston and Minnesota.

His playing availability is uncertain, but team officials are preparing to go without Curry for the final eight regular-season games and possibly the playoffs.

"I'm feeling fine and really miss my teammates, but I agree with the medical staff with regard to going through this process in a thorough, conservative, cautious manner," Curry said in the statement. "This has been draining on both me and my family, and I want to thank everyone for not invading our privacy.

"I would also like to thank all my fans for their prayers and concern for me and my family. Once all the testing is completed and I have more answers, I will talk to those of you seeking comments from me."

General manager John Paxson said as recently as Tuesday that having Curry play limited minutes Friday night against the New York Knicks was possible. Through a team spokesman, Paxson declined to answer questions Thursday, but he did comment in the statement.

"I've said from the beginning that we were going to be extremely thorough in this matter, and that has not changed," Paxson said. "Eddy has been evaluated by the best doctors in the field and continues to do so.

"Our first priority is Eddy's health, and we are going to be absolutely certain we have all the answers we need before he returns to the court."

The court is where an interesting dynamic remains.

On the one hand, the Bulls are 10-1 in their last 11 games and sit in fourth place, good enough for home-court advantage in the Eastern Conference playoffs. On the other, each game seems to bring a new injury or problem to a team that continues to show mental fortitude.

Othella Harrington rejoined the team Thursday night in New York after his wife gave birth to a daughter, Ava, on Wednesday. Harrington, averaging 7.8 points on 53.1 percent shooting, will provide a much-needed post option to lessen the pressure on perimeter players.

"There really is a burden there," coach Scott Skiles said. "I've been there myself as a player, and when you're on a team that maybe struggles to get shots right close in the paint, you feel like you have to make every shot.

"The last two games we've gotten great looks. We just haven't been able to make a very good percentage."

But Skiles could talk only about X's and O's and basketball for so long Thursday. He's fully aware of the impact the loss of Curry would have. Beyond basketball, Curry is one of the most popular and likable players on the Bulls, and strong chemistry has been cited all season as a reason for the Bulls' surprising success.

"It's tough for us as a team because, obviously, Eddy means a lot more to us and a lot more to me than just having a teammate around," said Tyson Chandler, one of Curry's closest friends. "We have to move on as a team, and we can't look forward to him coming back. We have to go game by game and expect him not to be here. We have to play like that.

"But it's definitely a little different on the plane rides. It's definitely a little different on the bus rides. Normally, we're kind of together in the back laughing and joking, playing games and stuff. It's hard."

Perhaps the hardest part is the Bulls are playing meaningful games in April and into May, and Curry, who has known only losing as a pro, is missing them. He committed himself to getting into good physical condition over the summer and played big in big games several times this season.

The payoff, however, might not be there. Curry, the Bulls' leading scorer, will miss his sixth straight game Friday night.

The original plan called for Curry to work out Tuesday and Wednesday at the Berto Center while wearing a monitor to track his heart's rhythm and electrical activity. Those plans were shelved as the team awaited results from a CT angiogram performed Monday to monitor blood flow.

Team officials weren't talking Thursday, but it is possible medical personnel didn't like the results from that test.

It's easy to understand why the Bulls are being cautious with a player in whom they expect to make a multimillion-dollar investment this summer.

"There's no question we miss Eddy," Skiles said. "I'm not trying to minimize that. But this doesn't change a whole lot how we do things. We're so late in the game now, we can't just all of a sudden leave the page and start trying to do things and make up for somebody's loss. We just have to play the other guys in his spot."

The other guys are producing. Harrington has played well. Antonio Davis sank the winning free throw in Wednesday night's overtime victory over Orlando. Curry or no Curry, the Bulls' magic number is two to clinch their first playoff berth in seven seasons.

"The mental toughness of our guys really has been extraordinary this year, no doubt about it," Skiles said.

"You can trace this all the way back to the summer and to training camp. We had a good foundation. When stuff gets rocky during the season, if you can get together in the gym and sort of just revisit the things you've been working on all along, it's important."

That's what the Bulls did Thursday in a brief practice at TD Waterhouse Centre. The news about Curry hung over the team like a cloud.

"I still haven't talked to him," Chandler said. "I just get word from people who have talked to him. He has his family with him. He has support people around him. I hope he's comfortable and feeling good."

kcjohnson@tribune.com
Copyright 2005, The Chicago Tribune (http://www.chicagotribune.com/)


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PacerFan31
04-14-2005, 04:35 PM
ESPNEWS reports that it could be career threatening, bcause he may need a difibulator or a pace maker.

*sry if someone already said this*

ImCrazyB
04-14-2005, 04:37 PM
When I first heard he had an irregular heart beat, I was really surprised they didn't just tell everyone then that he was out for the season because it's a pretty serious condition.

Anthem
04-14-2005, 04:39 PM
All right, I changed my mind about the Celtics. Bring on the Bulls!

We just need to win everything from here out, and we'll get the #4 seed.

Beautiful.

ABADays
04-14-2005, 04:39 PM
Wow - that guy just killed us this year.

Harmonica
04-14-2005, 04:44 PM
ESPNEWS reports that it could be career threatening, bcause he may need a difibulator or a pace maker.

That's a damn shame. Sounds like he may have something akin to what killed Reggie Lewis or Hank Gathers.

Here's an interesting article:

http://www.thestate.com/mld/thestate/sports/5767217.htm

wintermute
04-14-2005, 04:56 PM
All right, I changed my mind about the Celtics. Bring on the Bulls!

We just need to win everything from here out, and we'll get the #4 seed.

Beautiful.

bulls are still dangerous. their best guys are their guards anyway (hinrich, gordon). anyway, bulls' frontline is still intact, with chandler and a. davis filling in.

Peck
04-14-2005, 05:01 PM
All right, I changed my mind about the Celtics. Bring on the Bulls!

We just need to win everything from here out, and we'll get the #4 seed.

Beautiful.

You know, maybe I shouldn't even comment on this but I really hope you aren't serious about this.

"Beautiful" is the comment that you use when someone is diagnosed with a potential life threatening illness?

I understand looking for every advantage, especially in our troubled season, but "Beautiful" just doesn't strike me as the way to go here.

Peck
04-14-2005, 05:08 PM
ESPNEWS reports that it could be career threatening, bcause he may need a difibulator or a pace maker.

*sry if someone already said this*

I'm very curious as to what kind of rhythm he goes into. There is a world of differance between needing a defib & a pace maker.

I'm just guessing here but I would bet he either is going into SVT or A-Fib but he could very easily be having PVC's or even bouts of V-Tach. Somebody his size wouldn't suprise me if he might have WPW syndrome either.

Lots of things it could be, none of which are good. Scary really for somebody that young.

Anthem
04-14-2005, 05:21 PM
You know, maybe I shouldn't even comment on this but I really hope you aren't serious about this.

"Beautiful" is the comment that you use when someone is diagnosed with a potential life threatening illness?

I understand looking for every advantage, especially in our troubled season, but "Beautiful" just doesn't strike me as the way to go here.

Ehh, that's probably fair. I didn't read carefully enough, I guess. I'll go back, but I didn't see any indication that he was actually in any danger, the only question was whether or not he'd play again. Yes, these things can be "potentially life-threatening" but so can driving your car. There's a lot of space between "may never play professional basketball again" and "is in danger of dying." If he's closer to the second, then my apologies. I was under the impression that they're nowhere near suspecting the first.

I went for a long time with tachycardia, which is somewhat similar. I never fainted, but I experienced extreme weakness and wooziness. I have an enlarged heart because it worked so hard for so long. And at the other side of a lot of tests, I don't feel like I'm in danger. The danger in these things is in not paying attention. He'll have the best doctors in the world looking after him.

Do you really think his life is in danger?

ChicagoJ
04-14-2005, 05:25 PM
-snip- The danger in these things is in not paying attention. He'll have the best doctors in the world looking after him.

Do you really think his life is in danger?

Good thing he plays for the Bulls and not the Pacers, then.

:zip:

Since86
04-14-2005, 05:40 PM
. Somebody his size wouldn't suprise me if he might have WPW syndrome either.

That can be ruled out with an ECG can't it? I was diagnosed last summer for a irregular heart beat and a murmur. With that adn other characteristics they told me I was a good candidate to have WPW and had to get a ECG.

Harmonica
04-14-2005, 05:40 PM
The danger in these things is in not paying attention. He'll have the best doctors in the world looking after him.

Do you really think his life is in danger?

http://www.thestate.com/mld/thestate/sports/5767217.htm

Hicks
04-14-2005, 05:47 PM
I have the same feeling that I get whenever an opponent goes down because of an injury or condition. I'm very sorry to hear it for Eddy Curry, but I'm happy for what it means for the Pacers. Hopefully he feels better and is ready to go next year.

As for the Pacers, we just might make the semis.

Peck
04-14-2005, 06:42 PM
That can be ruled out with an ECG can't it? I was diagnosed last summer for a irregular heart beat and a murmur. With that adn other characteristics they told me I was a good candidate to have WPW and had to get a ECG.

An ECG can diagnose it. But to rule it out totally you would generaly need to go through a battery of test.

Here is a great EKG of WPW in action.

http://www.ecglibrary.com/ecgs/wpwaf2s.gif

Peck
04-14-2005, 06:47 PM
Ehh, that's probably fair. I didn't read carefully enough, I guess. I'll go back, but I didn't see any indication that he was actually in any danger, the only question was whether or not he'd play again. Yes, these things can be "potentially life-threatening" but so can driving your car. There's a lot of space between "may never play professional basketball again" and "is in danger of dying." If he's closer to the second, then my apologies. I was under the impression that they're nowhere near suspecting the first.

I went for a long time with tachycardia, which is somewhat similar. I never fainted, but I experienced extreme weakness and wooziness. I have an enlarged heart because it worked so hard for so long. And at the other side of a lot of tests, I don't feel like I'm in danger. The danger in these things is in not paying attention. He'll have the best doctors in the world looking after him.

Do you really think his life is in danger?

I'm sorry about posting what I did. I know you didn't mean anything negative by what you were saying, you were just looking at the good for the Pacers.

Now as to your question.

Yes, I do feel as though his life is in danger with what little I've read. But you have to understand that is a hazard of my job. I have to automatically assume somebody with a legitimate heart ailment (particularly someone so young) is in danger.

Like you said, not treating it would be the key. Hopefully they can get early detection & diagnosis so they can cure what ails him.

Again, I'm sorry for what I said.

Harmonica
04-14-2005, 06:59 PM
Peck mentioned WPW Syndrome. Here's some information about it:

http://www.c-r-y.org.uk/wpw.htm

Los Angeles
04-14-2005, 07:00 PM
Hey Peck, do you work for Guidant or something?

EDIT - maybe not, it sounds more like you're an EMT? RN? MD?

Gyron
04-14-2005, 07:22 PM
I think Peck is an EMT with like 15 yrs exp or something....He posted it somewhere once....

Peck
04-14-2005, 07:47 PM
Hey Peck, do you work for Guidant or something?

EDIT - maybe not, it sounds more like you're an EMT? RN? MD?

I am a Paramedic. In June I will have been in the E.M.S. field for 20 years.

Los Angeles
04-14-2005, 08:03 PM
I am a Paramedic. In June I will have been in the E.M.S. field for 20 years.
Very cool. :cool2:

I bet you've got some stories. :)

ABADays
04-14-2005, 08:05 PM
Nahhhhhhhhh!!!! Peck? Stories? Are you kidding me? ;)

Anthem
04-14-2005, 08:18 PM
Yes, I do feel as though his life is in danger with what little I've read. But you have to understand that is a hazard of my job. I have to automatically assume somebody with a legitimate heart ailment (particularly someone so young) is in danger.

Like you said, not treating it would be the key. Hopefully they can get early detection & diagnosis so they can cure what ails him.

Again, I'm sorry for what I said.

Don't be sorry, what you posted was totally right.

I started having heart problems at 20, so I (and my doctors) were somewhat freaked out. Both of my grandfathers have had quintuple bypasses. I've gotten EKGs, worn the tape player, and gotten ultrasounds (the same ones they use on pregnant women). My workouts these days are limited to strengthening and toning; I don't do anything that increases bulk. I have to watch my diet a lot for somebody my age. I strongly limit the amount of caffiene I have (since that was part of what really screwed me up) and make sure I get a decent amount of sleep (which was another part).

I guess I just looked at it like this: if an ESPN talking head says there's an outside chance that it might be career-ending, then we're not anywhere near the point where it's life-threatening.

Harmonica
04-14-2005, 08:50 PM
Don't be sorry, what you posted was totally right.

I started having heart problems at 20, so I (and my doctors) were somewhat freaked out. Both of my grandfathers have had quintuple bypasses. I've gotten EKGs, worn the tape player, and gotten ultrasounds (the same ones they use on pregnant women). My workouts these days are limited to strengthening and toning; I don't do anything that increases bulk. I have to watch my diet a lot for somebody my age. I strongly limit the amount of caffiene I have (since that was part of what really screwed me up) and make sure I get a decent amount of sleep (which was another part).

I guess I just looked at it like this: if an ESPN talking head says there's an outside chance that it might be career-ending, then we're not anywhere near the point where it's life-threatening.

What were you diagnosed with? I have episodic tachycardia. I can't remember the specific diagnosis, perhaps supraventricular tachycardia. And I have to limit my caffeine intake as well and I notice it tends to increase in likelihood when I don't get enough sleep. Sometimes it's triggered by a sudden move. I've had the holter monitor, echocardiogram, EKGs, treadmill, etc. Mine started when I was about 14 and it scared the crap out of me, but I didn't see a doctor for it until I was in my 20s because I could easily bring it under control with a few deep breaths. When that didn't work as well anymore, I became more concerned and sought advice.

Peck
04-14-2005, 09:14 PM
What were you diagnosed with? I have episodic tachycardia. I can't remember the specific diagnosis, perhaps supraventricular tachycardia. And I have to limit my caffeine intake as well and I notice it tends to increase in likelihood when I don't get enough sleep. Sometimes it's triggered by a sudden move. I've had the holter monitor, echocardiogram, EKGs, treadmill, etc. Mine started when I was about 14 and it scared the crap out of me, but I didn't see a doctor for it until I was in my 20s because I could easily bring it under control with a few deep breaths. When that didn't work as well anymore, I became more concerned and sought advice.

SVT sounds right in your case. Stimulation will trigger it so caffeine & lack of sleep will do it.

Did your Doctor teach you the valsalva manuever by any chance?

Suaveness
04-14-2005, 09:18 PM
I am a Paramedic. In June I will have been in the E.M.S. field for 20 years.

How do you like it?

Anthem
04-14-2005, 09:18 PM
What were you diagnosed with? I have episodic tachycardia. I can't remember the specific diagnosis, perhaps supraventricular tachycardia.

To be honest, I don't remember. "Episodic Tachycardia" sounds about right, but beyond that I don't know. Sleep and caffiene were the big deals in my case, though.

It seems my doctor thought it could have something to do with my thyroid... I have a long history of thyroid disease on my mother's side. Peck, does that ring any bells?

EDIT: I'd forgotten this until just now... When I first got to the ER the doctor tried to get me to confess to cocaine use.

Peck, what's the technique you're talking about?

Harmonica
04-14-2005, 09:27 PM
SVT sounds right in your case. Stimulation will trigger it so caffeine & lack of sleep will do it.

Did your Doctor teach you the valsalva manuever by any chance?

I know about a few things, like breathing exercises, drinking cold water, leg lifts and pushing like you're having a BM, but I've never heard of the valsalva manuever specifically. Is that where you massage the jugular vein?

ChicagoJ
04-14-2005, 10:08 PM
Dad's got an irregular (racing) pulse.

He grudingly quit the caffeine. His episodes are sporadic, maybe once per eight-nine months so they haven't identified the trigger but itd certianly the non-life-threatening version.

I quit the caffeine a decade ago with my first ulcers, which - believe it or not - were from the Cpa exam, not the Pacers.

It amazes me that caffeine doesn't get as much "bad press" as I think it deserves.

Peck
04-14-2005, 10:46 PM
How do you like it?

It's got it's good days & bad days, just like anything else.

I wish I had the brains you do so that I would have gone on to be a physician but I just honest to God hated school so bad that I never ever would have been able to do that.

BTW, what kind of Doc are you planning on being?

Peck
04-14-2005, 10:53 PM
I know about a few things, like breathing exercises, drinking cold water, leg lifts and pushing like you're having a BM, but I've never heard of the valsalva manuever specifically. Is that where you massage the jugular vein?

What's funny is that before we had Adenocard in the field one of the suggested treatments before attempting to give Calan was to stick the patients face in a bucket of ice water. It was always funny tring to convince little old ladies to shove their faces in to ice water :laugh:

The valsalva manuever is as follows:

Valsalva maneuver
Definition

The Valsalva maneuver is performed by attempting to forcibly exhale while keeping the mouth and nose closed. It is used as a diagnostic tool to evaluate the condition of the heart and is sometimes done as a treatment to correct abnormal heart rhythms or relieve chest pain.

Purpose

The Valsalva maneuver is used with patients who have suspected heart abnormalities, often in conjunction with echocardiography. The maneuver is based on the fact that when a patient forcibly exhales against a closed nose and mouth while bearing down, as if having a bowel movement, specific changes occur in blood pressure and the rate and volume of blood returning to the heart.

Comparing the changes in a diseased heart to those expected in a normal heart gives clues to the type and location of heart damage. In addition, when a doctor listens to the chest with a stethoscope during the Valsalva maneuver, characteristic heart sounds are heard. Variations in these sounds can indicate the type of abnormality present in the heart.

The Valsalva maneuver also corrects some rapid heartbeats originating in the atria. When the maneuver is done correctly, blood pressure rises. This forces the heart to respond by correcting its rhythm and beating more slowly. On rare occasions, the Valsalva maneuver can be used to diminish chest pain in patients with mild coronary disease.

Unrelated to any evaluation of the heart, the Valsalva maneuver is also taught to patients with multiple sclerosis who are unable to fully empty the bladder (flaccid bladder). It is sometimes used in sexual therapy to help men avoid premature ejaculation.

Precautions

The Valsalva maneuver should not be performed on patients who have severe coronary artery disease, have experienced recent heart attack, or where there is a moderate to severe reduction in blood volume.

Description

When performed formally, the patient is asked to blow against an aneroid pressure measuring device (manometer) and maintain a pressure of 40 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) for 30 seconds. Or, less formally, the patient may be asked to bear down, as if having a bowel movement. During this 30 second period, a recording is made of the changes in blood pressure and murmurs of the heart.

Preparation

The patient may be connected to a heart monitor and echocardiograph or the physician may simply use a stethoscope to monitor the heart. Sometimes an indwelling needle is inserted for accurate pressure measurements, depending on whether the procedure is being done for corrective or diagnostic purposes.

Aftercare

When this procedure is done to regulate irregular heart rhythms, the patient usually remains on a heart monitor to evaluate heartbeat.

Risks

The patient may feel dizzy or faint during the procedure, but serious consequences are rare. There is a risk that the Valsalva maneuver can cause blood clots to detach, bleeding, and abnormal rhythms originating in the ventricle. It can also cause cardiac arrest. Consequently, the procedure is usually performed in a setting where emergency equipment is accessible.

Normal results

There are four characteristic changes or phases in a normal heart's response to the Valsalva maneuver. An abnormality in any of these phases indicates a cardiovascular abnormality.

Terms:
Atria
The heart has four chambers. The right and left atria are at the top of the heart and receive returning blood from the veins. The right and left ventricles are at the bottom of the heart and act as the body's main pumps.
Echocardiography
An ultrasound test that shows the size, shape, and movement of the heart.


Resources:
BOOKS
Braunwald, Eugene, ed. Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine. Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders, 1997, 47, 198, 456.
"Valsalva's Maneuver." In Everything You Need to Know About Medical Treatments. Springhouse, PA: Springhouse Corp., 1996, 78-9.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------



The above information is an educational aid only. It is not intended as medical advice for individual conditions or treatments. Talk to your doctor, nurse or pharmacist before following any medical regimen to see if it is safe and effective for you.

This health encyclopedia is made possible by the Dr. Joseph F. Smith Trust Fund. Dr. Smith was a surgeon who resided in Wausau from 1908 to 1952. In addition to his surgical practice, Dr. Smith possessed a strong commitment to community service and medical education. The agreement which created the Dr. Joseph F. Smith Medical library was signed in July of 1948.

http://www.chclibrary.org/micromed/00069910.html

Peck
04-14-2005, 10:57 PM
To be honest, I don't remember. "Episodic Tachycardia" sounds about right, but beyond that I don't know. Sleep and caffiene were the big deals in my case, though.

It seems my doctor thought it could have something to do with my thyroid... I have a long history of thyroid disease on my mother's side. Peck, does that ring any bells?

EDIT: I'd forgotten this until just now... When I first got to the ER the doctor tried to get me to confess to cocaine use.

Peck, what's the technique you're talking about?

"Cocaine is a hell of a drug" Rick James

I've seen a few Coke induced A.M.I.'s & when they go down it's fast & fatal. Not very often are they brought back.

As to your condition I can't say. The fact that your heart enlarged due to the overload isn't suprising & to be honest is something you will have to be aware of the rest of your life. If you don't mind me asking did they say how much damage your ventricles suffered from this?

indygeezer
04-14-2005, 11:12 PM
Cripies Peck....the training they give you para-meds these days must be a whole heluvalot deeper than we EMT's went into 30 years ago!

Bandage em, shock em, wrap em in MAST trousers, or call a Preist that was about it. (Not really...I think we gave pretty dang good treatment-then they came out with a grab-em and go philosophy, bah!)

To this day my wife doesn't understand why I temnd to overlook the kids injuries. I try to tell her that I don't see bone sticking out, it ain't that bad. I guess when you've seen suicides and semi-wrecks a little FU at home don't mean much. Or have you ever noticed that? Maybe I'm just a heartless dad. (snif)

Suaveness
04-14-2005, 11:27 PM
It's got it's good days & bad days, just like anything else.

I wish I had the brains you do so that I would have gone on to be a physician but I just honest to God hated school so bad that I never ever would have been able to do that.

BTW, what kind of Doc are you planning on being?


Ha...I wish I had brains myself :-p

I'm not sure yet. I'm not even sure I'm going to med school, because I love doing research as well. I'd love to do something in the field of oncology tho...its so facinating. I've done a little of bone, cardio, and neuro research. Right now I'm going to be working in a chem lab tho...funny how it works

But honestly I can't say what I'm doing for sure

Harmonica
04-14-2005, 11:34 PM
"Cocaine is a hell of a drug" Rick James

I've seen a few Coke induced A.M.I.'s & when they go down it's fast & fatal. Not very often are they brought back.

Len Bias.

SoupIsGood
04-15-2005, 12:12 AM
This thread may have just convinced me to lay off the caffiene.

I'm thinking about getting into the medical field myself, it's nice to hear a few stories from others who have taken that path.

Speaking of school and such, I just got my SAT report back. :woot: I had been freaking out about that.

SoupIsGood
04-15-2005, 12:21 AM
Did you have to do it with that new scoring system, and with graded essays? If so, how was that?

Yeah, I did. It was the first it was offered around here, I think.

I liked it, overall. I don't mind writing. However, I did better in the math section than the other two. Not sure what happened there. :grumble:

Suaveness
04-15-2005, 12:34 AM
I think 107 or so got a perfect score

SoupIsGood
04-15-2005, 12:39 AM
I think 107 or so got a perfect score

Huh?

Edit - Nevermind, I getcha.

Anthem
04-15-2005, 12:48 AM
The fact that your heart enlarged due to the overload isn't suprising & to be honest is something you will have to be aware of the rest of your life. If you don't mind me asking did they say how much damage your ventricles suffered from this?

Very little. My heart's enlarged, but not to an unhealthy level. She said it looked like I was a runner. I haven't had any problems in 3 years now, so that's going well. Because of family history, I was better off keeping track of it anyway. I get checked out every year or so, and haven't had any problems so far.

Peck
04-15-2005, 01:33 AM
Cripies Peck....the training they give you para-meds these days must be a whole heluvalot deeper than we EMT's went into 30 years ago!

Bandage em, shock em, wrap em in MAST trousers, or call a Preist that was about it. (Not really...I think we gave pretty dang good treatment-then they came out with a grab-em and go philosophy, bah!)

To this day my wife doesn't understand why I temnd to overlook the kids injuries. I try to tell her that I don't see bone sticking out, it ain't that bad. I guess when you've seen suicides and semi-wrecks a little FU at home don't mean much. Or have you ever noticed that? Maybe I'm just a heartless dad. (snif)

Funny how now a days when I talk about MAST trousers these kids just look at me as though I were talking in Latin. I can remember when they first were the first line treatment of choice for almost all forms of shock. Now they don't even teach them anymore. It's a damn shame really cause, IMO, they work. Not like they originally told us they would, but they worked nonetheless.

If you think that's bad though try mentioning sandbags to people for C-Spine & they will look at you as though you should be committed. :laugh:

indygeezer
04-15-2005, 07:47 AM
I gave up on the amblance riding when I realized I was more worried about putting on rubber gloves and masks than I was taking care of the victim.
Suave....if going into research...stay away from industry as much as possible. They'll take the "love" out of it. Been there for almost 40 years and for the most part it's just been a paycheck. It's all about profitability. Yeah we make good stuff that helps people that really need it...but it's still all about the $$$.
25 years ago it wasn't that way..but (shutup ya sound like an oldman....ok, gosh!)

Suaveness
04-15-2005, 09:57 AM
I gave up on the amblance riding when I realized I was more worried about putting on rubber gloves and masks than I was taking care of the victim.
Suave....if going into research...stay away from industry as much as possible. They'll take the "love" out of it. Been there for almost 40 years and for the most part it's just been a paycheck. It's all about profitability. Yeah we make good stuff that helps people that really need it...but it's still all about the $$$.
25 years ago it wasn't that way..but (shutup ya sound like an oldman....ok, gosh!)

I have been advised that by the many people I know who work at industry, so that is why I have been hesitant on doing research. We'll see how it goes I guess.

sweabs
04-15-2005, 11:34 AM
Speaking of career-ending injuries, could anyone give me a list of some that have occurred in the past?

Thanks.

Anthem
04-15-2005, 11:39 AM
The most recent was another Bulls lotto pick, who wrapped his bike around a mailbox or something.

sweabs
04-15-2005, 11:41 AM
Yeah, Jason Williams (who may be back though).

I should be more specific - guys who got injuries FROM PLAYING basketball in the league that ended their careers.

Any names you guys can think of?

ChicagoJ
04-15-2005, 11:48 AM
Pacers (ex-Pacers) have a long history of this:

kellogg (knee/ ACL)
stipanovich (knee/ arthritis)
haskins (knee/ ACL)
micheal williams (foot)
workman (knee/ ACL)